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(Reason Magazine)   Space X's Elon Musk: "I think it would be cool to be born on Earth and die on Mars. Hopefully not at the point of impact"   (reason.com) divider line 31
    More: Amusing, Elon Musk, SpaceX, crash landing, primes  
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1672 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Mar 2012 at 3:16 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-15 03:24:14 PM  
Why does Elon Musk sound like the name of a character in a Stephenson novel.... or a band name?
 
2012-03-15 03:28:12 PM  
Not if it's powered by same crappy system as your Tesla.
 
2012-03-15 03:33:28 PM  
I know a lot of Cerberus biatches that died on Mars recently. RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH (vanguard shout) RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGH! (nova yell)
 
2012-03-15 03:39:19 PM  
He sounds fun. And I remember watching the Space X launch last... year? Year before? At any rate, it was very cool.

The article claims that he can get testy, but I thought his reactions were pretty guarded. If NASA told me 2017, I'd be going to the press with "And then there's THESE lazy sonsabiatches..."
 
2012-03-15 03:45:54 PM  
"Success is one of the possible outcomes."

I'm going to steal that quote...

He's using alot of morbid humor but its not unexpected or unwarranted.
Going to space is dangerous and going to Mars is perhaps the most risky thing any man will ever do in this century.
You can't go into that kind of venture, as a rocket developer nor as an astronaut, if you aren't able to laugh at the deadly reality of it all.
 
2012-03-15 03:54:09 PM  

Aidan: He sounds fun. And I remember watching the Space X launch last... year? Year before? At any rate, it was very cool.

The article claims that he can get testy, but I thought his reactions were pretty guarded. If NASA told me 2017, I'd be going to the press with "And then there's THESE lazy sonsabiatches..."


It was last year. they have been stuck in scheduling issues with their latest launch, which was suppose to be last fall but is now due for the spring.

NASA's problem is the engineers can't do anything that the congress critters tell them they can't do. The SLS platform costs more per year in maintenance costs then space X has spent on the entirety of the Falcon project. Many NASA engineers would rather have just built something entirely new, instead of trying to shoehorn shuttle parts into the new platform.
 
2012-03-15 03:56:15 PM  
Well hopefully you can stagger around in flames for a bit first.

But seriously, it would suck to be born on Mars.

"Mommy, when can I visit Earth, where all the cool stuff is, where Disneyland is, where the beaches and the mountains are, where the cities filled with people are?"

"Never, your bones and organs are too soft. Earth has three times the gravity of Mars. You can never go there, not ever."

"Gee, thanks mom & dad, thanks a bunch!"
 
2012-03-15 04:11:07 PM  

sinanju: Why does Elon Musk sound like the name of a character in a Stephenson novel.... or a band name?


Sounds more like a cologne to me.
 
2012-03-15 04:24:01 PM  

Antimatter: It was last year. they have been stuck in scheduling issues with their latest launch, which was suppose to be last fall but is now due for the spring.


SpaceX's last launch was in December 2010. They didn't launch in 2011.

SpaceX has big, big plans, but I'd like to see them launch more than once every couple of years.
 
2012-03-15 04:34:03 PM  

JamesWhitsun: sinanju: Why does Elon Musk sound like the name of a character in a Stephenson novel.... or a band name?

Sounds more like a cologne to me.


Elon Musk
Pour l'homme
 
2012-03-15 05:38:26 PM  
SpaceX is going to get to Mars long before NASA does, or is capable.

Why?

Because they have a plan. Everything else Musk does for anyone else is just a big systems engineering test for his rockets moving towards the eventual goal. And he is making NASA pay for it anyway, whether or not they get an actual rovket design they can use.

Brilliant.
 
2012-03-15 06:00:27 PM  

BZWingZero: Antimatter: It was last year. they have been stuck in scheduling issues with their latest launch, which was suppose to be last fall but is now due for the spring.

SpaceX's last launch was in December 2010. They didn't launch in 2011.

SpaceX has big, big plans, but I'd like to see them launch more than once every couple of years.


Wonder what the hold up is, the first two flights seemed to go well.
 
2012-03-15 06:51:05 PM  
Can't blame him for thinking existing on Mars would be cool.
If I had a name like Elon Musk I'd want to run far away from Earth too.
 
2012-03-15 06:51:13 PM  
FTFA: "it's all about making life multiplanetary"

Um, not so fast. All indications are that humans "going interplanetary" will not end well, and the participants will lucky to survive the adventure. NASA and the Russians have already discovered all sorts of medical maladies associated with ISS stays of as short as 6 months. Bone and eye deterioration and brain swelling are only the quickest to manifest themselves. Let's face it, we are evolved for a 1G environment, and we'd better figure out how to deal with low gees before we send people off for years at a time.

Robots are cheap to design, build and get into space, and if they fail on launch or crash into their target we don't really care. So let's plan to use them.
 
2012-03-15 06:51:15 PM  

Antimatter: BZWingZero: Antimatter: It was last year. they have been stuck in scheduling issues with their latest launch, which was suppose to be last fall but is now due for the spring.

SpaceX's last launch was in December 2010. They didn't launch in 2011.

SpaceX has big, big plans, but I'd like to see them launch more than once every couple of years.

Wonder what the hold up is, the first two flights seemed to go well.


right now they're playing nice with nasa, working to get the dragon capsule rated for ISS ferry duty. nasa is dragging its feet.

and they can't get the capsule hatch certified without docking to a nasa asset.
 
2012-03-15 07:22:54 PM  
Personally I liked the "Wocka wocka" editorial insert
 
2012-03-15 07:45:04 PM  
Dieing of asphyxiation on a mars would not be a good way to die.

StoneColdAtheist:

Let's face it, we are evolved for a 1G environment, and we'd better figure out how to deal with low gees before we send people off for years at a time.


Perhaps more research into gravity so we can come up with a portable gravitation device.
Even if it is just big enough for a sleeping surface it would provide enough time in a gravity
environment to extend a persons time in space to years without having severe medical problems.
 
2012-03-15 08:00:25 PM  

MorePeasPlease: If I had a name like Elon Musk I'd want to run far away from Earth too.


I think he's running away from all the people he's pissed off over the years with his incompetent management, arrogant attitude, and insistence on taking credit for work he didn't do.
 
2012-03-15 08:05:04 PM  
Long term plan's not for tourism kids.

The species is not going to survive in the long term on a single world. A single system, maybe.

/somewhere out there is a bumper sticker that says "Adapt or Die".
 
2012-03-15 08:33:24 PM  
if I'm given my choice of ways to die, it will be staring into the light of an alien sun on the shores of an uncharted sea
 
2012-03-15 11:22:31 PM  
Did this come to mind for anyone else?:

cb.pbsstatic.com
 
2012-03-15 11:55:01 PM  

StoneColdAtheist: FTFA: "it's all about making life multiplanetary"

Um, not so fast. All indications are that humans "going interplanetary" will not end well, and the participants will lucky to survive the adventure. NASA and the Russians have already discovered all sorts of medical maladies associated with ISS stays of as short as 6 months. Bone and eye deterioration and brain swelling are only the quickest to manifest themselves. Let's face it, we are evolved for a 1G environment, and we'd better figure out how to deal with low gees before we send people off for years at a time.

Robots are cheap to design, build and get into space, and if they fail on launch or crash into their target we don't really care. So let's plan to use them.


Err... the ISS is a 0-g environment, Mars is 0.38g. Now, I'm no space medicine researcher, but I know that 38% is much higher than 0%. We've done plenty to study the long term effects of zero-g, but only a few studies that I know of of low-g, and those are for small, rotating artificial gravity environments.

I would love to be pointed to any studies publicly available in layman's language that have covered martian-range gravity and its long term effects on terrestrial life.
 
2012-03-16 12:10:22 AM  
"it's all about making life multiplanetary,"

i229.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-16 01:58:57 AM  

StoneColdAtheist: FTFA: "it's all about making life multiplanetary"

Um, not so fast. All indications are that humans "going interplanetary" will not end well, and the participants will lucky to survive the adventure. NASA and the Russians have already discovered all sorts of medical maladies associated with ISS stays of as short as 6 months. Bone and eye deterioration and brain swelling are only the quickest to manifest themselves. Let's face it, we are evolved for a 1G environment, and we'd better figure out how to deal with low gees before we send people off for years at a time.

Robots are cheap to design, build and get into space, and if they fail on launch or crash into their target we don't really care. So let's plan to use them.


Let me paraphrase:

"I hate living in New Jersey. Maybe I should get a job in Wyoming and buy a house with some land out in the country."

"Why don't you send a robot to do the job in Wyoming?"


Robots are fine for gathering scientific data, but sometimes that really isn't the point.

sparkeyjames: Perhaps more research into gravity so we can come up with a portable gravitation device.
Even if it is just big enough for a sleeping surface it would provide enough time in a gravity
environment to extend a persons time in space to years without having severe medical problems.


And maybe if you make it really powerful, it will be able to detach my palm from my face. There are exactly two kinds of "portable gravitation devices:" one is called a "centrifuge," the other is called "lots of really heavy shiat." Sci-fi movies' excuses for filming in a 1 g environment don't actually create new terms in Einstein's field equations.
 
2012-03-16 02:10:52 AM  

Antimatter: Aidan: He sounds fun. And I remember watching the Space X launch last... year? Year before? At any rate, it was very cool.

The article claims that he can get testy, but I thought his reactions were pretty guarded. If NASA told me 2017, I'd be going to the press with "And then there's THESE lazy sonsabiatches..."

It was last year. they have been stuck in scheduling issues with their latest launch, which was suppose to be last fall but is now due for the spring.

NASA's problem is the engineers can't do anything that the congress critters tell them they can't do. The SLS platform costs more per year in maintenance costs then space X has spent on the entirety of the Falcon project. Many NASA engineers would rather have just built something entirely new, instead of trying to shoehorn shuttle parts into the new platform.


Senate
Launch
System

I remember the day they announced that flying pork barrel. Me and everyone else nearby just burst out laughing.
 
2012-03-16 08:06:28 AM  
SLS is a paper rocket and will never fly, it's a feeble attempt by the president to try to hold on to Florida in the upcoming election. It will be cancelled as soon as he's reelected.
 
2012-03-16 09:04:59 AM  

pag1107: SLS is a paper rocket and will never fly, it's a feeble attempt by the president to try to hold on to Florida in the upcoming election. It will be cancelled as soon as he's reelected.


By the president? No, by the the people who have Space Shuttle factories in their districts. And those guys will fight to keep them open for as long as possible. This move is counter to the direction Obama's has been convinced to take the space program by industry advisers.
 
2012-03-16 10:09:01 AM  

Professor Science: StoneColdAtheist: Robots are cheap to design, build and get into space, and if they fail on launch or crash into their target we don't really care. So let's plan to use them.

Let me paraphrase:

"I hate living in New Jersey. Maybe I should get a job in Wyoming and buy a house with some land out in the country."

"Why don't you send a robot to do the job in Wyoming?"

Robots are fine for gathering scientific data, but sometimes that really isn't the point.


I understand that for many folks back east everything west of the Hudson "might as well be on Mars", so it sometimes comes as a bit of a shock to learn that anyone healthy enough for space travel can WALK from New Jersey to Wyoming in about 3 months, staying in a comfortable hotel each night. Not only that, but those hotels have clean sheets, cable TV and even that whole running water and indoor plumbing thing people are so fond of. Total cost? About $100 a day, including comfortable clothes and shoes, meals and hotel, for a total of about $2000.

In contrast, a flight from Earth to Mars takes 6 months or more each direction (in microgravity...same as on the Space Station). When astronauts return to Earth from a year at the ISS they typically spend a few weeks flat on their backs, and months fully recovering. Good thing Mar's gravity is only about 40% of Earth's, or the crew could arrive incapacitated.

And then there is the cost. Current launch costs (exclusive of vehicle cost) to escape velocity from Earth top $50,000 a kilogram, and the Orion MPCV weighs 20,000 kg minimum, so we're looking at a cool billion dollars for a one-way ticket to Mars for 4 people. Then you got to get them back.

Point being that practical realities argue against manned missions for the foreseeable future. Manned missions cost at least 10 times that of unmanned missions with the same science profiles. I'm all for exploring and exploiting space resources, but I think it needs to be done affordably and safely so the public will support it long term, instead of getting tired of the cost and the loss of human life.
 
2012-03-16 01:40:33 PM  

StoneColdAtheist: Professor Science: StoneColdAtheist: Robots are cheap to design, build and get into space, and if they fail on launch or crash into their target we don't really care. So let's plan to use them.

Let me paraphrase:

"I hate living in New Jersey. Maybe I should get a job in Wyoming and buy a house with some land out in the country."

"Why don't you send a robot to do the job in Wyoming?"

Robots are fine for gathering scientific data, but sometimes that really isn't the point.

I understand that for many folks back east everything west of the Hudson "might as well be on Mars", so it sometimes comes as a bit of a shock to learn that anyone healthy enough for space travel can WALK from New Jersey to Wyoming in about 3 months, staying in a comfortable hotel each night. Not only that, but those hotels have clean sheets, cable TV and even that whole running water and indoor plumbing thing people are so fond of. Total cost? About $100 a day, including comfortable clothes and shoes, meals and hotel, for a total of about $2000.

In contrast, a flight from Earth to Mars takes 6 months or more each direction (in microgravity...same as on the Space Station). When astronauts return to Earth from a year at the ISS they typically spend a few weeks flat on their backs, and months fully recovering. Good thing Mar's gravity is only about 40% of Earth's, or the crew could arrive incapacitated.

And then there is the cost. Current launch costs (exclusive of vehicle cost) to escape velocity from Earth top $50,000 a kilogram, and the Orion MPCV weighs 20,000 kg minimum, so we're looking at a cool billion dollars for a one-way ticket to Mars for 4 people. Then you got to get them back.

Point being that practical realities argue against manned missions for the foreseeable future. Manned missions cost at least 10 times that of unmanned missions with the same science profiles. I'm all for exploring and exploiting space resources, but I think it needs to be done affordably and safely so the public will support it long term, instead of getting tired of the cost and the loss of human life.


Which is why the US government cannot run a space colonization program. It cannot carry out decades-long projects, nor undertake projects with a high probability of death for all concerned. I would even argue that sending citizens on one way trips is counter to the purpose of modern government, which is to control its people.

When we colonize Mars, it will be an NGO that does it, and for non-commercial purposes. And I think that there will probably be attempts at military actions taken by multiple governments to stop it. Any high tech offworld unaligned colony will conjure up images of potential future orbital bombardment by the offworlders.

Yeah, any manned trip to Mars will be one way I think. There are still people willing to risk both death in failure and life in offworld exile. They won't be using the public's money to do it, either, leaving naysayers no legitimate way to stop it.

I'm not wanting to leave the planet myself, but I am involved in helping to establish businesses and industry to enable those who want to, to eventually do so.
 
2012-03-16 03:05:59 PM  

BolloxReader: Which is why the US government cannot run a space colonization program. It cannot carry out decades-long projects, nor undertake projects with a high probability of death for all concerned. I would even argue that sending citizens on one way trips is counter to the purpose of modern government, which is to control its people.

When we colonize Mars, it will be an NGO that does it, and for non-commercial purposes. And I think that there will probably be attempts at military actions taken by multiple governments to stop it. Any high tech offworld unaligned colony will conjure up images of potential future orbital bombardment by the offworlders.

Yeah, any manned trip to Mars will be one way I think. There are still people willing to risk both death in failure and life in offworld exile. They won't be using the public's money to do it, either, leaving naysayers no legitimate way to stop it.

I'm not wanting to leave the planet myself, but I am involved in helping to establish businesses and industry to enable those who want to, to eventually do so.


Interesting points, but I have to ask where the money is going to come from, if not government(s)? Going to Mars is not a sub-orbital hop, and even Musk is heavily dependent on NASA contracts to get develop his vehicle. Not to mention the order of magnitude greater challenge of getting from LEO to Mars.
 
2012-03-16 04:19:04 PM  

Professor Science: StoneColdAtheist:

sparkeyjames: Perhaps more research into gravity so we can come up with a portable gravitation device.
Even if it is just big enough for a sleeping surface it would provide enough time in a gravity
environment to extend a persons time in space to years without having severe medical problems.

And maybe if you make it really powerful, it will be able to detach my palm from my face. There are exactly two kinds of "portable gravitation devices:" one is called a "centrifuge," the other is called "lots of really heavy shiat." Sci-fi movies' excuses for filming in a 1 g environment don't actually create new terms in Einstein's field equations.


Yes because all our equations and known facts about the universe are correct and not
to be trifled with. Our understanding of the universe is in it's infancy who's to tell what we'll
find out in the future. Oh and keep slapping yourself in the face every time you think something
cannot be done. Just when you think you know everything about something some genius will come along and prove you
were an idiot.
 
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