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(NBC Miami)   Florida wins prize for U.S. state mostly likely to be screwed from rising sea levels and climate change   (nbcmiami.com) divider line 157
    More: Florida, sea-level rise, seas, United States, Climate Central, Miami, storm surges, Florida counties, climate change  
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3899 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Mar 2012 at 8:50 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-15 08:51:13 AM  
Okay, who's going to post the "I'm okay with this" guy?
 
2012-03-15 08:51:28 AM  
As someone who is currently five feet above sea level I'm getting a kick out of this thread ...
 
2012-03-15 08:51:35 AM  
Well, yes. It's flat and it's about a foot above sea level. Florida trumps Obvious tag?
 
2012-03-15 08:52:20 AM  
Hurrah for living in Colorado.
 
2012-03-15 08:55:52 AM  
Its okay. Most people in Florida don't beleive in global warming and plus, CO2 is good for plants. Are we now being told water is bad for beaches?
 
2012-03-15 08:57:19 AM  
I wouldn't put too much stock in climate change predictions. The speculation so far has been all over the map, and none of the predictions have come true.

Then again, wiping Florida off the map might not be the worst thing in the world.
 
2012-03-15 08:58:31 AM  
These must be Floridian scientists if they're just figuring this out now.
 
2012-03-15 08:59:00 AM  
I tend to think there are two reasons why Florida is pretty much flat.

1. Alluvial plain

2. Some huge motherfarking tsunamis--both meteorite and massive earthquake types--scoured the fark out of it over the eons.

A little of one, a little of the other.
 
2012-03-15 09:00:06 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: I wouldn't put too much stock in climate change predictions. The speculation so far has been all over the map, and none of the predictions have come true.

Then again, wiping Florida off the map might not be the worst thing in the world.


Weather is freaken hard to predict, but predictions have so far been quite close and its certainly approaching the increased temperature and extreme weather occurrences that were predicted, its a few years late though.
 
2012-03-15 09:01:10 AM  
Good thing climate change is 100% false then, huh?
 
2012-03-15 09:01:11 AM  
Miami-Dade and Broward counties will be a much diminished place," says Wanless, a climate scientist at the University of Miami."There's almost no way around it. I used to think that this was something my kids would probably have to deal with. But now, it's unbelievable.
 
2012-03-15 09:01:18 AM  
When I first came here, this was all swamp. Everyone said I was daft to build a state on a swamp, but I built in all the same, just to show them. It sank into the swamp. So I built a second one. That sank into the swamp. So I built a third. That burned down, fell over, then sank into the swamp. But the fourth one stayed up. And that's what you're going to get, Lad, the strangest state in all America.

/oblig.
 
2012-03-15 09:02:15 AM  

MindStalker: AverageAmericanGuy: I wouldn't put too much stock in climate change predictions. The speculation so far has been all over the map, and none of the predictions have come true.

Then again, wiping Florida off the map might not be the worst thing in the world.

Weather is freaken hard to predict, but predictions have so far been quite close and its certainly approaching the increased temperature and extreme weather occurrences that were predicted, its a few years late though.


"The average number of extreme weather events recorded increased from 2.5 per year in the 1920s to 8.5 in the 1940s to 350 per year for the period 2000-2010"
http://reason.org/news/show/extreme-weather-kills-fewer-people
We are just adapting to it and handling it better.
 
2012-03-15 09:03:24 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Good thing climate change is 100% false then, huh?


No, the one inch rise in sea levels over the next 100 years will kill us all.
 
2012-03-15 09:03:51 AM  

TheShavingofOccam123: I tend to think there are two reasons why Florida is pretty much flat.

1. Alluvial plain

2. Some huge motherfarking tsunamis--both meteorite and massive earthquake types--scoured the fark out of it over the eons.

A little of one, a little of the other.


It is made from the erosion of the Appalachian Mountains. It's a giant sandbar.
 
2012-03-15 09:04:07 AM  
I blame img0.fark.net
 
2012-03-15 09:04:41 AM  
Where is all this water going to come from?

Gore has testified that something like half of the Arctic ice caps have melted, yet no one noticed any change in sea level.
 
2012-03-15 09:06:35 AM  
I thought the warmers had crawled back into their holes.
 
2012-03-15 09:06:59 AM  

ChoNeko: Where is all this water going to come from?

Gore has testified that something like half of the Arctic ice caps have melted, yet no one noticed any change in sea level.


Arctic ice melt doesn't affect sea level.
 
2012-03-15 09:07:13 AM  
Alternative Headline: Florida wins prize for state most likely to benefit U.S. by being flooded under rising sea levels due to climate change.
 
2012-03-15 09:07:48 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Good thing climate change is 100% false then, huh?


Yah, this seems like one of those "two wrongs make a right" situations.
 
2012-03-15 09:09:17 AM  
The land we now call Florida began to form by a combination of volcanic activity and the deposit of marine sediments. It formed along northwest Africa about 530 million years ago. In earliest times, Florida was part of Gondwanaland, the super continent that later divided into Africa and South America. There is evidence that Florida separated from Gondwanaland about 300 million years ago. Florida eventually found itself wedged between Gondwanaland and North America when they combined to form the super continent Pangea. When Pangea began to break up, Florida remained behind with North America. Florida slipped slowly beneath the waves to become part of North America's continental shelf. The landmass that is now Florida remained shallowly submerged beneath the ocean. Coral, shellfish, and fish skeletons piled up. This created a layer of limestone hundreds (in some places thousands) of feet thick. As the Appalachian Mountains eroded, sand and clay were deposited over Florida's limestone layer. Much of the quartz sand covering the state today came from the rocks of that mountain chain. Throughout most of its history, Florida has been under water. Portions of the Florida peninsula have been above or below sea level at least four times. As glaciers of ice in the north expanded and melted, the Florida peninsula emerged and submerged. When the sea level was lowest, the land area of Florida was much larger than it is now. The sea level was as much as 100 feet lower than at present. Florida's west coastline was probably 100 miles further out. As the climate warmed, the glaciers melted. This raised the sea level and flooded the Florida peninsula. The sea level stood at least 100 to 150 feet above the present level. Florida probably consisted of islands. The formation of the Florida Keys occurred when tiny coral created a 150-mile long chain of underwater coral reefs. As the landmass of southern Florida began its slow rise, the reefs also began to emerge. The Florida peninsula is the emergent portion of the Florida Platform. This is a wide, relatively flat land formation. The Florida Platform lies between the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. (new window)
 
2012-03-15 09:10:11 AM  
wouldn't be the first time. This whole state has been underwater at some point in history. Living on a barrier island, my place will be one of the first to be slowly,slowly,slowly flooded.

/dnrtfa
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-03-15 09:11:23 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Good thing climate change is 100% false then, huh?


At least 200%
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-03-15 09:15:31 AM  

Party Boy: Miami-Dade and Broward counties will be a much diminished place," says Wanless, a climate scientist at the University of Miami."There's almost no way around it. I used to think that this was something my kids would probably have to deal with. But now, it's unbelievable.


Yeah, kind of like tax cuts. "You mean I am not going to be able to leave it for my grandkids to pay for? WTF!"
 
2012-03-15 09:17:47 AM  
Yeah..that whole 20 cm is gonna flood it.
 
2012-03-15 09:18:30 AM  

MindStalker: MindStalker: AverageAmericanGuy: I wouldn't put too much stock in climate change predictions. The speculation so far has been all over the map, and none of the predictions have come true.

Then again, wiping Florida off the map might not be the worst thing in the world.

Weather is freaken hard to predict, but predictions have so far been quite close and its certainly approaching the increased temperature and extreme weather occurrences that were predicted, its a few years late though.

"The average number of extreme weather events recorded increased from 2.5 per year in the 1920s to 8.5 in the 1940s to 350 per year for the period 2000-2010"
http://reason.org/news/show/extreme-weather-kills-fewer-people
We are just adapting to it and handling it better.


"The average number of extreme weather events recorded increased from 2.5 per year in the 1920s to 8.5 in the 1940s to 350 per year for the period 2000-2010. The study notes technological and telecommunication advances made it significantly easier to learn of and respond to weather events. Broader news coverage and an increased tendency by authorities to declare natural disaster emergencies have also contributed to the large uptick in the number of storms recorded. "

Try to quote the context, too. We didn't even bother naming hurricanes until 1950 or counting hurricanes until 1935. Basically, we have a better idea today of how many hurricanes there were in 1920 than they did in 1920. A thorough, national study of weather patterns is a remarkably modern concept, and largely successful only after the implementation of weather satellites and digital linkages.
 
2012-03-15 09:22:37 AM  
EVERYBODY PANIC! MOVE SLIGHTLY INLAND!
 
2012-03-15 09:24:51 AM  
Yay, then my N. FL property will become waterfront property at some point! I'm gonna be rich! Oh, wait, what about my condo in Mexico Beach FL? Now I haz sad.
 
2012-03-15 09:25:01 AM  

mr lawson: Yeah..that whole 20 cm is gonna flood it.


With a 3-4 foot sea level rise, most of Florida would still be emergent. It's mostly a thin fringe along the coasts and large parts of the southernmost portion that would be submerged. But sea levels would have to go up by more than 300 feet to submerge the whole state.

teachingboxes.org

There are other maps out there. But yeah: Miami would be in some trouble, for sure.
 
2012-03-15 09:25:30 AM  
Not news (new window)
/Link (new window)
 
2012-03-15 09:25:42 AM  
The NASA-funded Sea Level Research Group is based at the University of Colorado. It made the announcement last week that it will begin adding a nonexistent 0.3 millimeters per year to its Global Mean Sea Level Time Series.


And which state's residents win the prize for being most at risk for Unincorn impalement and porcine flybys?


Climate scientists withdraw journal claims of rising sea levels
Your religion's "sky is falling" predictions are as reliable as "Armageddon begins ___/___/___" prediction from competing religious nuts.
 
2012-03-15 09:26:02 AM  
Well, we're really just talking about Miami here (in the scope of TFA anyhow).

And it's not so much "florida scientists" as "florida dirt-bag sensationalist 'journalists'"

so, yay?

/wouldn't miss Miami
//would miss the Keys though.
 
2012-03-15 09:26:57 AM  
That would be a problem for Floridians if 'climate change' weren't a big fraud.
 
2012-03-15 09:29:15 AM  
Yay?
 
2012-03-15 09:33:27 AM  
God will provide all True Believers with arks. If She can remember what a cubit is.
 
2012-03-15 09:33:38 AM  
Tide comes in,tide goes out, rivers rise. rivers drop. lakes rise. lakes dry up. Cycles. how do they work?
 
2012-03-15 09:35:00 AM  
Time to move to Britton Hill.
 
2012-03-15 09:38:39 AM  

canyoneer: The land we now call Florida began to form by a combination of volcanic activity and the deposit of marine sediments. It formed along northwest Africa about 530 million years ago. In earliest times, Florida was part of Gondwanaland, the super continent that later divided into Africa and South America. There is evidence that Florida separated from Gondwanaland about 300 million years ago. Florida eventually found itself wedged between Gondwanaland and North America when they combined to form the super continent Pangea. When Pangea began to break up, Florida remained behind with North America. Florida slipped slowly beneath the waves to become part of North America's continental shelf. The landmass that is now Florida remained shallowly submerged beneath the ocean. Coral, shellfish, and fish skeletons piled up. This created a layer of limestone hundreds (in some places thousands) of feet thick. As the Appalachian Mountains eroded, sand and clay were deposited over Florida's limestone layer. Much of the quartz sand covering the state today came from the rocks of that mountain chain. Throughout most of its history, Florida has been under water. Portions of the Florida peninsula have been above or below sea level at least four times. As glaciers of ice in the north expanded and melted, the Florida peninsula emerged and submerged. When the sea level was lowest, the land area of Florida was much larger than it is now. The sea level was as much as 100 feet lower than at present. Florida's west coastline was probably 100 miles further out. As the climate warmed, the glaciers melted. This raised the sea level and flooded the Florida peninsula. The sea level stood at least 100 to 150 feet above the present level. Florida probably consisted of islands. The formation of the Florida Keys occurred when tiny coral created a 150-mile long chain of underwater coral reefs. As the landmass of southern Florida began its slow rise, the reefs also began to emerge. The Florida peninsula is ...


Well, I didn't say when tsunamis sheared the top off of Florida...

/People...clouding the issue with facts
 
2012-03-15 09:39:55 AM  
This is interesting:

Aquifer drawdown or overdrafting and the pumping of fossil water increases the total amount of water in the hydrosphere, and may be responsible for up to one quarter of the Earth's total sea level rise since the beginning of the 20th century.[5] (new window)

Also, perhaps some of the climate wonks can comment, but as I understand it, predicting sea level rise is a hellishly complicated problem. It's not uniform over the globe, like filling up a glass of water. For instance, the melting of all that ice in places like Greenland will reduce the weight of ice and cause isostatic rebound - the crust will rise, meaning that sea levels in parts of the high latitudes could actually go down, although gravity at the poles is slightly higher than at the equator. And variations in the density of the crust (oceanic or continental) can cause anomalies, causing local or regional variations in sea level. IOW, adding more water to the hydrosphere will nott cause uniform sea level rise, and some places could actually experience lower sea levels.
 
2012-03-15 09:44:39 AM  
^I'd imagine crust will react slower than water. Parts of Baltic Sea are still rising after glaciation retreated 10000+ years ago
 
2012-03-15 09:48:51 AM  
I can vouch for that...we didn't even have a winter this year, and I live in north Florida. The azaleas were blooming in February and it's midway through March and the pollen is dreadful. I have to get back to work because I need a new air conditioning unit before it hits 110 degrees by April 1.
 
2012-03-15 09:52:42 AM  

LewDux: ^I'd imagine crust will react slower than water. Parts of Baltic Sea are still rising after glaciation retreated 10000+ years ago


And correct me if I'm wrong, but the density of the water makes a difference, too. Differing levels of sainity and water temperature can cause volumes to differ, translating into variations in local/regional sea level on the order of dozens of centimeters.
 
2012-03-15 09:54:00 AM  

MindStalker: MindStalker: AverageAmericanGuy: I wouldn't put too much stock in climate change predictions. The speculation so far has been all over the map, and none of the predictions have come true.

Then again, wiping Florida off the map might not be the worst thing in the world.

Weather is freaken hard to predict, but predictions have so far been quite close and its certainly approaching the increased temperature and extreme weather occurrences that were predicted, its a few years late though.

"The average number of extreme weather events recorded increased from 2.5 per year in the 1920s to 8.5 in the 1940s to 350 per year for the period 2000-2010"
http://reason.org/news/show/extreme-weather-kills-fewer-people
We are just adapting to it and handling it better.


Oddly enough, we're also making better recordings, measuring things more accurately, have more population density to raise the number of witnesses and victims of "extreme" weather events, and have changed definitions to fit where appropriate.

How hard is weather to predict? When I was in flight school in '89, we were told that a 24 hour local prediction would be about 85% correct, dropping to 40% over 48 hours, and 15% to 72 hours, with subsequent predictions being useless. In the 23ish years, our long-term predictions haven't gotten substantially better, but our ability to predict actual occurring weather is positively phenomenal.

But your bolded point is misleading at best; so many models and predictions have been made now that cherry-picking a given result set and saying "see, I told you so (it's just late)" is complete BS.
 
2012-03-15 09:55:05 AM  

canyoneer: mr lawson: Yeah..that whole 20 cm is gonna flood it.

With a 3-4 foot sea level rise, most of Florida would still be emergent. It's mostly a thin fringe along the coasts and large parts of the southernmost portion that would be submerged. But sea levels would have to go up by more than 300 feet to submerge the whole state.

[teachingboxes.org image 640x523]

There are other maps out there. But yeah: Miami would be in some trouble, for sure.



Dammit... Well, can we still set up trenches and machine gun nests along the Georgia border and panhandle to keep refugees from the flooded coastal cities from infecting the rest of the country?
 
2012-03-15 10:08:20 AM  
Oh my farkin' God that means all of theat 3rd world shiat will be moving further north. Those people have already destroyed one beautiful city and now they will move again and of course with our governments help of course. White folks, Native Floridians ( yes there are a few of us left ) sorry but that help isnt yours. Only 3rd world types would get help, right former President JImmy Carter? I mean you did start this whole mess down there didn't you????
 
2012-03-15 10:09:06 AM  
Wow, you think they could have found a better picture of Miami

media.nbcmiami.com

I thought the prescription ran out on my glasses...
 
2012-03-15 10:09:45 AM  
To: Berlin_Freeper

'Invisible tsunami' of rising sea levels puts US coasts at risk, expert says.

Typical alarmist propaganda, and who are these "experts"?

Matter cannot be created or destroyed. Where are they going to get all the water. The antarctic shelf is back to normal. The arctic melt down is insignificant worldwide.

Obama is putting the entire country at risk, not mother nature.

28 posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2012 9:21:40 AM by chainsaw (Sarah Palin is still my first choice to save the USA. . .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]
 
2012-03-15 10:11:01 AM  
The rapidly warming climate ( we had almost no winter in NY this year and yesterday the temp was 75 in the burbs of NYC ) is also doing away with any reason to move down south to escape winter.

Southern real estate is going to be worth less and less.
 
2012-03-15 10:15:28 AM  
It means Cubans are going to need better boats and rafts to make the extra mileage.
 
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