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(MSNBC)   Autonomous robots swim from California to Hawaii without carrying fuel, just in case Sarah Connor happened to be floating out there somewhere   (msnbc.msn.com) divider line 11
    More: Cool, autonomous robots, oceans, Hawaii, Mariana Trench, accessibilities, environmental monitoring, fuels, PacX Wave Gliders  
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3336 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Mar 2012 at 4:27 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-14 01:21:42 AM
No fate.
 
2012-03-14 08:17:51 AM
Sounds like a good way to smuggle drugs to me. Only problem: They travel at about half a knot. It's expected that they will take 300 days to go 3,300 nautical miles (3,300nm/300d = 11 nm/d / 24h/d = 0.46 knots).

The design itself looks pretty simple to replicate:


www.innovationnewsdaily.com
 
2012-03-14 08:30:41 AM
I, for one, welcome our new robotic water-bound overlords...
 
2012-03-14 08:31:52 AM

JamesWhitsun: Only problem: They travel at about half a knot. It's expected that they will take 300 days to go 3,300 nautical miles


From TFA, it sounds like these are doing significantly better - 3,200 miles in 4 months (~130 days). Of course, that's a fair bit longer than the crow-flies distance of ~2,300 miles from San Francisco to, say, Hilo, so if ocean currents are less favorable, maybe the slower speed results?
 
2012-03-14 10:04:05 AM
Wasn't this an episode of Gilligan's Island?
 
2012-03-14 10:34:08 AM

dbirchall: JamesWhitsun: Only problem: They travel at about half a knot. It's expected that they will take 300 days to go 3,300 nautical miles

From TFA, it sounds like these are doing significantly better - 3,200 miles in 4 months (~130 days). Of course, that's a fair bit longer than the crow-flies distance of ~2,300 miles from San Francisco to, say, Hilo, so if ocean currents are less favorable, maybe the slower speed results?


I expect that it's dependent on the amount of swell also. Still, that's twice the speed at just over a knot.
 
2012-03-14 12:25:23 PM

Tom_Slick: Wasn't this an episode of Gilligan's Island?


www.anonymousphilanthropist.com
 
2012-03-14 01:19:34 PM
images.wikia.com

Don't blame me, I voted for Ackerman
 
2012-03-14 03:30:58 PM
Late 1980s 'infinity torpedo' designs used reentrant foam density chambers that compress when they warm up and expand when they cool. Torpedo sinks until it cools in the colder, deeper water, and then it becomes more buoyant and rises until it reaches the surface. As it warms up near the surface, it becomes less buoyant and sinks again.

Because it has fins attached, it doesn't rise and fall in a straight line, so it moves around the ocean (currents and wave action also play a huge part). Theoretically, it moves around, without guidance, until either it fails structurally (MTBF in centuries), is beached permanently, or the oceans reach a uniform temperature (don't hold your breath).

Minor guidance system + movable fins = endless intelligent transit, and hence the name. Put a GPS unit in the nose, and it knows where it is every time it surfaces. Much easier to do now than it was then. Hawaii to California is nice for a project but just a short trip.

They were proposed as oceanographic aids, but . . . if you put compressed gas cylinders on board and a simple targetting system, the torpedo can surface from great depth all at once directly beneath a ship. (Ever let go of a kickboard you were holding underwater? Imagine it was over a kilometer down and massed a hundred kilograms.) And there's no motor, so it's virtually silent and nearly undetectable.

Of course, if the system were ever put into use, the Navy didn't admit it.
 
2012-03-14 03:46:43 PM

Sofa King Smart: Tom_Slick: Wasn't this an episode of Gilligan's Island?

[www.anonymousphilanthropist.com image 218x242]


leaving satisfied
 
2012-03-14 04:35:07 PM

RandomAxe: Late 1980s 'infinity torpedo' designs


Oddly, nowadays, GIS for that phrase comes up with lots of mobile phones, Blue Man Group, and Brazilians. I think I'll go back to sleep, in hopes that the world is less confusing next time I wake up.
 
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