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(Daily Tarheel)   Scientists discover a way to flush out HIV hiding latent in cells. Magic Johnson relieved that AIDS won't be hanging over his head anymore   (dailytarheel.com) divider line 19
    More: Interesting, aides, cell phones, HIV, Southwestern Medical Center, hiding, scientists  
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2983 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Mar 2012 at 12:36 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-12 12:42:29 PM
Magic Johnson relieved that AIDS won't be hanging over his head anymore

I guess he would. Am I missing a joke here?
 
2012-03-12 01:00:46 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: Magic Johnson relieved that AIDS won't be hanging over his head anymore

I guess he would. Am I missing a joke here?


The fact that instead of it being a death sentence for him that we thought it would be at the time, he's outlived other celebrities of the era like Whitney Huston and Michael Jackson. It's probably more of a testament to what medical science can do if you are wealthy than anything, but he has been REALLY healthy contrary to what most people expected back then. Of course, it has to suck to be rich and healthy and to have to remain celibate during some of the best years of your life, or else risk endangering your partner.
 
2012-03-12 01:26:38 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonsil_Trouble
 
2012-03-12 01:30:03 PM
My viruses would come out if someone made a vaccine out of this guy. Can you blame them?

I've been Martinized!
 
2012-03-12 01:57:32 PM

Mad_Radhu: AverageAmericanGuy: Magic Johnson relieved that AIDS won't be hanging over his head anymore

I guess he would. Am I missing a joke here?

The fact that instead of it being a death sentence for him that we thought it would be at the time, he's outlived other celebrities of the era like Whitney Huston and Michael Jackson. It's probably more of a testament to what medical science can do if you are wealthy than anything, but he has been REALLY healthy contrary to what most people expected back then. Of course, it has to suck to be rich and healthy and to have to remain celibate during some of the best years of your life, or else risk endangering your partner.


What does his wealth have to do with anything? If you have basic health insurance, you have access to the same meds as Magic, probably for nearly free. Sure, he probably eats nice meals, but everyone should eat nice meals. You don't have to be rich to live a healthy life.

Regarding celibacy, Magic is not... And if you read the article, they note that the virus can't really be transmitted if one is on effective treatment, let alone the fact that you can use a condom, let alone just dating someone else who is also hiv+.
 
2012-03-12 02:30:38 PM

T.rex: If you have basic health insurance, you have access to the same meds as Magic, probably for nearly free.


Because basic insurance covers experimental treatments all the time...
 
2012-03-12 02:44:54 PM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: T.rex: If you have basic health insurance, you have access to the same meds as Magic, probably for nearly free.

Because basic insurance covers experimental treatments all the time...


Please go on...
He's on medication, available to even the poorest African, which keeps his viral load down to nill. What exactly are you proposing he needs or would benefit from, above and beyond that?

Besides, if someone wanted to try an experimental treatment, THEY get paid to do it, not the other way around.

If anything, Magic suffered through about ten years of treatment that did a lot of damage to his body, until the 'triple-cocktails' regimens that came out in the late 90's. Look at his body. Its a clear fat-restribution side effect of the older meds that are now out of vogue.

Someone newly infected today, is in a better predicament than Magic ever was. They will start off on the least toxic, and most effective regimen, with least side effects.
 
2012-03-12 03:09:27 PM
South Park already discovered why Magic Johnson is so healthy [from my link above]--

[Magic] Johnson is sympathetic toward the boys, offering assistance, but is unsure what he has in his house that helps. Upon investigation, Kyle and Cartman find that Johnson sleeps regularly with huge piles of cash in his bedroom, because he does not trust banks; cash eventually proves to have the ability to neutralize HIV. Laboratory scientists experiment with a concentrated dose of "about $180,000 shot directly into the bloodstream" on the boys, which forces the HIV to disintegrate. Word is spread about the cure for AIDS and an event is held at which Jimmy Buffett once again sings "CUREburger in Paradise". Volunteers spread the word to poverty-stricken Africa that the fight against AIDS is over because all those suffering from the AIDS epidemic have to do now is inject themselves with piles of cash - which of course they do not have.
 
2012-03-12 04:20:38 PM

T.rex: Regarding celibacy, Magic is not... And if you read the article, they note that the virus can't really be transmitted if one is on effective treatment, let alone the fact that you can use a condom, let alone just dating someone else who is also hiv+.


Even with a great guy like Magic who is going to be careful, I have to wonder how willing someone would be to take a chance that the viral load is low enough to not cause an infection. Condoms are problematic for regular sex because they can break, and dating someone else with HIV has its own problems, as there are different strains of the virus. Even if your particular virus is under control, you run the risk of contracting a strain that may be less treatable by retrovirals and may more aggressively progress to full blown AIDS. Plus, it is just never a good idea to mix different viral strains together anyway, since there is always the risk of creating a nasty drug resistant strain out of genetic material from two viruses that may have partial resistance to a cocktail.
 
2012-03-12 04:38:20 PM
I had a gay HIV "not full blown AIDS" positive friend who was a total gym bunny. Muscled, healthy, gregarious, etc... Outside of the assload of pills he took every morning, he showed absolutely none of the physical signs of being infected.

He did, however, have a huge issue with being any distance from bathrooms. The cocktail he was taking gave him "right now" diarrhea on occasion.
 
2012-03-12 04:52:34 PM
theskinnyonmyjeans.files.wordpress.com

/obscure?
 
2012-03-12 05:20:36 PM

T.rex: Please go on...
He's on medication, available to even the poorest African, which keeps his viral load down to nill. What exactly are you proposing he needs or would benefit from, above and beyond that?



In 1991 when he announced his infection that medication was not available to "even the poorest African" - or even really anyone who wasn't rich. Any drugs he's now on were almost certainly bleeding edge tech back then. If he hadn't been very wealthy he quite possibly would have died by now. I'd even say probably. Hell, almost certainly.

That was also right around the same time one of my uncles was diagnosed with HIV. My uncle was not rich like Magic Johnson, but he was by no means poor and he had excellent health insurance. There just wasn't as much they could do in those days. I don't remember exactly how long my uncle lasted, even with excellent medical care..... but I know it wasn't particularly long.

Being very wealthy gets you access to cutting edge care - and lots of it - that other people simply do not get. They can fly overseas, pay for experimental drugs that would only otherwise be accessible to people through closed limited trials, etc. etc....
 
2012-03-12 06:20:14 PM

mongbiohazard: T.rex: Please go on...
He's on medication, available to even the poorest African, which keeps his viral load down to nill. What exactly are you proposing he needs or would benefit from, above and beyond that?


In 1991 when he announced his infection that medication was not available to "even the poorest African" - or even really anyone who wasn't rich. Any drugs he's now on were almost certainly bleeding edge tech back then. If he hadn't been very wealthy he quite possibly would have died by now. I'd even say probably. Hell, almost certainly.

That was also right around the same time one of my uncles was diagnosed with HIV. My uncle was not rich like Magic Johnson, but he was by no means poor and he had excellent health insurance. There just wasn't as much they could do in those days. I don't remember exactly how long my uncle lasted, even with excellent medical care..... but I know it wasn't particularly long.

Being very wealthy gets you access to cutting edge care - and lots of it - that other people simply do not get. They can fly overseas, pay for experimental drugs that would only otherwise be accessible to people through closed limited trials, etc. etc....


I'm deeply sorry for your uncle. I'm not prone to believe that Magic had access to different or better drugs than your uncle, however. Back then, it was monotherapy AZT which was prescribed, which is essentially chemotherapy in pill form, and frankly, Magic is lucky to have lived through it, himself. That treatment, many believe, helped push a lot of people to the brink worse than the virus.

All this talk about 'experimental' treatments, as if its a good thing... Its just as likely, if not more likely, as being a bad thing.... No doctor who wants to see his patient live is going to recommend experimental anything. They are going to toe the line of dogmatic theory.
 
2012-03-12 06:41:38 PM

T.rex: All this talk about 'experimental' treatments, as if its a good thing... Its just as likely, if not more likely, as being a bad thing.... No doctor who wants to see his patient live is going to recommend experimental anything. They are going to toe the line of dogmatic theory.



Today? Absolutely. We have some effective treatments today.

But back then? No. Remember that back then it was seen as a pretty likely death sentence and with doctors and scientists scrambling to find effective treatments because we didn't really have any. A lot of theories though. And if the malady that you're fighting is fatal and there *is* no readily accepted effective treatments yet and you've got money for all the best doctors, yeah.... you just might end up taking risks you might not otherwise, and have the means to make it happen regardless of cost or insurance company approval.

Fast forward a couple decades though and you're absolutely right. But it wasn't always like this. Back in the day HIV was making people *panic*. Magic Johnson coming out was a big part of humanizing those afflicted and demystifying the disease.
 
Skr
2012-03-12 07:16:53 PM
www.lameduck.com
There goes the HIV! SHOOT IT! SHOOT IT!
 
2012-03-12 07:38:32 PM
Snark and MJ aside, this is a big f'ing deal.
Hope it's as promising as the article claims.
 
2012-03-12 09:10:39 PM
Oh, is it this talk again...? It must already be six months since the last "breakthrough" that can lead to a cure just so long as that sweet, sweet grant money keeps rolling in.
 
2012-03-13 07:34:36 AM

Wolf892: Oh, is it this talk again...? It must already be six months since the last "breakthrough" that can lead to a cure just so long as that sweet, sweet grant money keeps rolling in.


You don't really understand how experimental science works, do you?
 
2012-03-13 08:18:50 PM

mongbiohazard:
True enough.

PepperFreak: Snark and MJ aside, this is a big f'ing deal.
Hope it's as promising as the article claims.


I'm not so sure... This study is already several years old. Its based on the idea that patients who take the hiv meds have an undetectable viral load, but if they stop the meds, it comes back, leading some to speculate that the virus was "hiding out" in lymph nodes or organs. If they could somehow 'flush it out' from those resovoirs, and kill the remainder of the virus, the person would be cured.

However, thats just a theory. There's a growing sentiment that it doesn't 'hide out', whatsoever, but is simply reduced in quantity by the meds to an extent that current medical testing can no longer detect it, though its still there, floating freely in the blood. If the meds are stopped, its just starts replicating again.... In other words, there's nothing to 'flush out'... its already there, just not visible by current testing when the virus is in such small numbers.
 
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