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(io9)   Watch drops of water in space 'orbit' a knitting needle like tiny planets   (io9.com) divider line 54
    More: Cool, orbits, planets, change of position, syringe, International Space Station, Positive charge  
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11594 clicks; posted to Video » on 10 Mar 2012 at 3:17 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-09 07:51:27 PM
Water drops ..... innnnnn spaaaaaace ......
 
2012-03-09 08:48:47 PM
very cool
 
2012-03-09 08:52:51 PM
I wish I was an astronaut.

"What will you contribute to science with your precious time aboard the ISS?"

"I'm gonna make water spin round needles."

"Approved! Here's money!"
 
2012-03-09 10:19:37 PM
I always get a bit sad when I think of the cuts in our space program. That was cool.
 
2012-03-10 12:56:44 AM
That is the coolest thing I have seen all day, and I spent all day playing Mass Effect 3.
 
2012-03-10 03:32:45 AM
i1127.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-10 03:36:40 AM
I farkING LOVE SCIENCE!
 
2012-03-10 03:36:59 AM
Squee! Orbital mechanics and electrical charges.
 
2012-03-10 03:38:37 AM

doglover: I wish I was an astronaut.

"What will you contribute to science with your precious time aboard the ISS?"

"I'm gonna make water spin round needles."

"Approved! Here's money!"


He said it was in his crew preference kit. That's the load of personal items the astronaut is allowed to bring aboard to make the trip suck less. That + water = no additional cost.

I did find it amusing that the path the the droplets took looked an awful lot like the Mercator-projection orbital path charts they use in ground control, though.
 
2012-03-10 03:42:26 AM
Knitting needle. This is a knitting needle.

Not "nittin".

NASA is an equal opportunity employer.
 
2012-03-10 03:52:14 AM
Incredible how interchangeable electromagnetic forces can be.
 
2012-03-10 04:54:45 AM
Forgive me, my electromagnetism is a bit rusty: are all the magnetic components induced by the moving charges negligible in these experiments (so we can ignore B terms)? Are the orbits almost entirely resulting from electrostatic inverse square force i.e. F ~= qE?
 
2012-03-10 05:47:35 AM
Well, if I do the math. I think it would be P-oT+aT=O
/got nothing
 
2012-03-10 06:49:25 AM
very nice link subby
 
2012-03-10 08:02:38 AM

gwowen: Forgive me, my electromagnetism is a bit rusty: are all the magnetic components induced by the moving charges negligible in these experiments (so we can ignore B terms)? Are the orbits almost entirely resulting from electrostatic inverse square force i.e. F ~= qE?


Ahhhh... Yes. Yes, it is.

/Slowly backs out of thread
 
2012-03-10 08:05:31 AM
Judging by the increases in velocity, this would play havoc with a planet.
 
2012-03-10 08:12:04 AM
Angular momentum is the tinfoil hat Newtonians wear to keep the gravitational curvature of space out of their brainwaves.
 
2012-03-10 08:13:03 AM
Link of the Day!
 
2012-03-10 08:15:01 AM
NITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneed le
 
2012-03-10 08:16:23 AM
Gravity is only a theory.
 
2012-03-10 08:20:34 AM

INeedAName: Judging by the increases in velocity, this would play havoc with a planet.


Particularly when it slams into the 'sun' at the end.
 
2012-03-10 08:34:39 AM
 
2012-03-10 08:36:38 AM
Why does a man have a knitting needle?
 
2012-03-10 09:03:26 AM

buckler: doglover: I wish I was an astronaut.

"What will you contribute to science with your precious time aboard the ISS?"

"I'm gonna make water spin round needles."

"Approved! Here's money!"

He said it was in his crew preference kit. That's the load of personal items the astronaut is allowed to bring aboard to make the trip suck less. That + water = no additional cost.

I did find it amusing that the path the the droplets took looked an awful lot like the Mercator-projection orbital path charts they use in ground control, though.


...But why didn't he spend that knitting needle money on my preferred pet project instead?

/looks so much like an orbital path you almost wonder if some of what we see out there isn't being effected by electromagnetic forces instead of gravity.
 
2012-03-10 09:05:17 AM

stuhayes2010: Why does a man have a knitting needle?


It wasn't obvious? He had it to make water dropplets go around it in space

/that and to repair any holes in his space suit
 
2012-03-10 09:51:05 AM

Basil: Knitting needle. This is a knitting needle.

Not "nittin".

NASA is an equal opportunity employer.


I was laughing at that. The guy is probably smarter than all of us combined, but can't lose that twang.
 
2012-03-10 10:04:15 AM
I watched the video before reading the article.

When he opened his mouth I was like "who is this retard saying nittin needle."

Then the droplets started going, and I was like wait...how is that possible? Then I realized they must be in 0 gravity...then I realized he must be an astronaut...then I felt like a retard for thinking he is a retard.

/nittinneedle
 
2012-03-10 10:34:40 AM

ChrisDe: Basil: Knitting needle. This is a knitting needle.

Not "nittin".

NASA is an equal opportunity employer.

I was laughing at that. The guy is probably smarter than all of us combined, but can't lose that twang.


InfamousBLT: I watched the video before reading the article.

When he opened his mouth I was like "who is this retard saying nittin needle."

Then the droplets started going, and I was like wait...how is that possible? Then I realized they must be in 0 gravity...then I realized he must be an astronaut...then I felt like a retard for thinking he is a retard.

/nittinneedle


John Nash: NITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINnee d le



Apparently this is a huge thing for Southerners. Super-smart ones can't get hired for smart jobs.

/ Prestigious vs. non-prestigious regional accents

// Sociolinguistics is a science too!

/// ... but, I admit, almost never as cool as what this here redneck can do with a nittinneedle and some wahturr
 
2012-03-10 10:39:11 AM
Someone talking science with an accent like that sounds so... wrong :
 
2012-03-10 11:14:13 AM

way south: buckler: doglover: I wish I was an astronaut.

"What will you contribute to science with your precious time aboard the ISS?"

"I'm gonna make water spin round needles."

"Approved! Here's money!"

He said it was in his crew preference kit. That's the load of personal items the astronaut is allowed to bring aboard to make the trip suck less. That + water = no additional cost.

I did find it amusing that the path the the droplets took looked an awful lot like the Mercator-projection orbital path charts they use in ground control, though.

...But why didn't he spend that knitting needle money on my preferred pet project instead?

/looks so much like an orbital path you almost wonder if some of what we see out there isn't being effected by electromagnetic forces instead of gravity.


Of course it looked like an orbital path. Whether you use the gravitational force or the electromagnetic force, they both have an acceleration term that is used in the equation for determining angular velocity and angular acceleration. The rotational equations have the same general form regardless of what force you start with.
 
2012-03-10 12:46:40 PM

stuhayes2010: Why does a man have a knitting needle?


Since when is knitting, crochet, embroidery, lacemaking, tailoring or any other threadcraft/needlecraft 'wimminz things'? I crochet, cross stitch and embroider when my internet access is down, it's relaxing, and it produces functional art.

Quit being sexist, you prick.

/crocheted the wife a scarf last year.
//of my chest hair.
 
2012-03-10 12:58:10 PM

Make More Hinjews: ChrisDe: Basil: Knitting needle. This is a knitting needle.

Not "nittin".

NASA is an equal opportunity employer.

I was laughing at that. The guy is probably smarter than all of us combined, but can't lose that twang.

InfamousBLT: I watched the video before reading the article.

When he opened his mouth I was like "who is this retard saying nittin needle."

Then the droplets started going, and I was like wait...how is that possible? Then I realized they must be in 0 gravity...then I realized he must be an astronaut...then I felt like a retard for thinking he is a retard.

/nittinneedle

John Nash: NITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINneedleNITTINnee d le


Apparently this is a huge thing for Southerners. Super-smart ones can't get hired for smart jobs.

/ Prestigious vs. non-prestigious regional accents

// Sociolinguistics is a science too!

/// ... but, I admit, almost never as cool as what this here redneck can do with a nittinneedle and some wahturr


I'll admit that in high school and college, I learned to be able to lose my accent when I need to. It still comes out sometimes - amuses my girlfriend to no end.

Also, I didn't notice that he had an accent until y'all pointed it out. You'd think that after blasting off into space he'd have some extra g's to get rid of.
 
2012-03-10 01:06:29 PM

I May Be Crazy But...: I'll admit that in high school and college, I learned to be able to lose my accent when I need to. It still comes out sometimes - amuses my girlfriend to no end.

Also, I didn't notice that he had an accent until y'all pointed it out. You'd think that after blasting off into space he'd have some extra g's to get rid of.


Hahahaha!!! Your Confederate newsletter, I wants it ;)
 
2012-03-10 01:21:27 PM

Make More Hinjews: I May Be Crazy But...: I'll admit that in high school and college, I learned to be able to lose my accent when I need to. It still comes out sometimes - amuses my girlfriend to no end.

Also, I didn't notice that he had an accent until y'all pointed it out. You'd think that after blasting off into space he'd have some extra g's to get rid of.

Hahahaha!!! Your Confederate newsletter, I wants it ;)


Alternate version: It's a zero g environment, what would you expect?

/See, puns get better the more variations you tell of the same one.
 
2012-03-10 02:42:41 PM

stuhayes2010: Why does a man have a knitting needle?


Real men know how to sew, hem, repair and create.

For instance, I give you Gir-Domo:
i451.photobucket.com
i451.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-10 02:43:49 PM
Heh, god damn attention whoring bike... how did she slip into that last pic?
 
2012-03-10 02:56:56 PM
Don Pettit? (checks TFA), YES! I had the pleasure of attending an after-dinner talk by him at the Kennedy Space Center a few years ago. I was with a group of scientists and science educators, so he quickly realized that we were all delighted to see the experiments that he had put together in his free time using spare parts and other found materials on the ISS.
 
2012-03-10 03:17:56 PM

way south: /looks so much like an orbital path you almost wonder if some of what we see out there isn't being effected by electromagnetic forces instead of gravity.


Those ARE orbits. Orbit does NOT mean "movement caused by gravity." An orbit is something that occurs when you have a central force. Gravity and electromagnetic force both fall of as 1/r2, so OF COURSE they'd produce the same orbits.

As far as the planets go, the planets are electrically neutral, while the Sun might have a slight charge in one way or the other but completely negligible for calculating orbits.
 
2012-03-10 06:13:41 PM
I found myself wondering how different the orbits would if the needle were free to respond to the attraction from the droplets.

Cause, you know, I'm all smrt and know that objects don't orbit another, but both of them orbit around the center of mass of the system, but not smart enough to know if that would be the same in electromagnetism.

Neat video
 
2012-03-10 07:19:03 PM
It's a fascinating video and from an educational stand point good shiat. But shouldn't those jokers be outside building the space station rather than hiding in the work-mens hut all day?
 
2012-03-10 08:07:24 PM

Chevello: Cause, you know, I'm all smrt and know that objects don't orbit another, but both of them orbit around the center of mass of the system, but not smart enough to know if that would be the same in electromagnetism.


One difference between electric force and gravity is that the gravitational "charge," that is to say, "mass," is also what resists acceleration. When dealing with acceleration due to electric force, it's still the mass that resists the acceleration, but it's the electric charge that determines the magnitude of the force.

Because of this, the electrically charged objects wouldn't revolve around the center of mass of the system, simply because it isn't mass that is creating the central force.
 
2012-03-10 09:40:46 PM

jack21221: Chevello: Cause, you know, I'm all smrt and know that objects don't orbit another, but both of them orbit around the center of mass of the system, but not smart enough to know if that would be the same in electromagnetism.

One difference between electric force and gravity is that the gravitational "charge," that is to say, "mass," is also what resists acceleration. When dealing with acceleration due to electric force, it's still the mass that resists the acceleration, but it's the electric charge that determines the magnitude of the force.

Because of this, the electrically charged objects wouldn't revolve around the center of mass of the system, simply because it isn't mass that is creating the central force.


Noooo, that's wrong... quite wrong... newton's third law, specifically the strong form of the law (new window) states that if A exerts a force on B along a line between A and B then B exerts and equal force on A along the same line...The cause of the force is irrelevant... both gravity and coulomb's law (the force of attraction/repulsion between two charged particles) are inverse square laws which mean that the magnitude of the force drops off as the distance between the two particles, squared. So since both laws have the same distance dependence their behavior with respect to two particles is the same. When one object is more massive than the other the center of mass lies much closer to the massive object. In the case of gravity that's why the earth/sun system has a center of mass closer to the sun... In an atom, bound by the electromagnetic force, you have a similar situation--The center of mass sits near or within the nucleus since the mass of an electron is a 1000 times less than that of a proton. However if you were to replace the nucleus with a positron (which has the same mass as an electron but opposite charge) the electron and positron would orbit around a center of mass that was half way between both particles (ie positronium (new window)). When this happens in space with object like binary stars they also orbit similarly around a center of mass that's between both stars and positioned based on the relative masses.
 
2012-03-10 11:16:52 PM
I totally missed that Pettit is back in the ISS. I thought this video was from his time there in 2002-3. That's way cool that he's back up there. If any of you geeky Farkers ever get a chance to hear him speak, don't miss it.
 
2012-03-10 11:37:36 PM
Physics is different from gravity? I'm still out there on that one... but orbiting.
 
2012-03-11 12:31:29 AM
Whats going on here?

www.arcturi.com
 
2012-03-11 01:01:14 AM
I want to know what happens to the droplets that achieve escape velocity. They presumably keep traveling until they contact a surface or a stray electrical charge. Who approved shooting water around inside a space station built out of sensitive electrical components?
 
2012-03-11 01:20:17 AM

Kavis: I want to know what happens to the droplets that achieve escape velocity. They presumably keep traveling until they contact a surface or a stray electrical charge. Who approved shooting water around inside a space station built out of sensitive electrical components?


You're absolutely right. Who let this dangerous idiot aboard our 100 billion dollar space station. It's like they're letting anyone up there these days. He probably never even thought about squirting that water around. Next you'll tell me that they're letting them use the bathroom up their, coating the entire place with their filthy urine. They should just hold it until they land!
 
2012-03-11 05:11:26 AM
So what will happen if he places two or three needles side by side. Love to see the results.
 
2012-03-11 09:31:28 AM

kikaku: jack21221: Chevello: Cause, you know, I'm all smrt and know that objects don't orbit another, but both of them orbit around the center of mass of the system, but not smart enough to know if that would be the same in electromagnetism.

One difference between electric force and gravity is that the gravitational "charge," that is to say, "mass," is also what resists acceleration. When dealing with acceleration due to electric force, it's still the mass that resists the acceleration, but it's the electric charge that determines the magnitude of the force.

Because of this, the electrically charged objects wouldn't revolve around the center of mass of the system, simply because it isn't mass that is creating the central force.

Noooo, that's wrong... quite wrong... newton's third law, specifically the strong form of the law (new window) states that if A exerts a force on B along a line between A and B then B exerts and equal force on A along the same line...The cause of the force is irrelevant... both gravity and coulomb's law (the force of attraction/repulsion between two charged particles) are inverse square laws which mean that the magnitude of the force drops off as the distance between the two particles, squared. So since both laws have the same distance dependence their behavior with respect to two particles is the same. When one object is more massive than the other the center of mass lies much closer to the massive object. In the case of gravity that's why the earth/sun system has a center of mass closer to the sun... In an atom, bound by the electromagnetic force, you have a similar situation--The center of mass sits near or within the nucleus since the mass of an electron is a 1000 times less than that of a proton. However if you were to replace the nucleus with a positron (which has the same mass as an electron but opposite charge) the electron and positron would orbit around a center of mass that was half way between both particles (ie positronium (new window ...


You are absolutely 100% correct, and I don't know what I was thinking.
 
2012-03-11 12:14:21 PM
WTF. This is what they're doing in space? We learned about the physics behind this in what, 3rd grade? We spend billions of dollars for the to conduct elementary science experiments? WTF.
 
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