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(YouTube) Video Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson's remarks at Senate Commerce hearing on the future of our space program   (youtube.com) divider line 85
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4734 clicks; posted to Video » on 09 Mar 2012 at 2:11 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-09 12:26:19 PM  
Really hope this goes green.
 
2012-03-09 12:34:04 PM  
A bookmark for when I get home and can listen? Perhaps.
 
2012-03-09 01:01:43 PM  

Slaxl: A bookmark for when I get home and can listen? Perhaps.


Here's a PDF transcript of his remarks.

Link (new window)
 
2012-03-09 01:20:48 PM  

Slaxl: A bookmark for when I get home and can listen? Perhaps.


I too will watch this when I get home. Neil is my hero.
 
2012-03-09 01:54:53 PM  
I have a mad geek crush of an overtly sexual nature on the brilliant Dr. Tyson.

/Oh yes, talk nerdy to me.
 
2012-03-09 02:15:03 PM  
Our future space program consists of watching the Chinese take all the vast resources of the solar system out to the Oort Cloud, at which they'll start outsourcing to Proxima Centauri.
 
2012-03-09 02:21:43 PM  
i.imgur.com

Nye-Tyson 2012
 
2012-03-09 02:23:53 PM  
As a Canadian, i know how close the Us and Canada's beliefs, culture, and lives are linked.

I whole-heartedly applaud this. We do need to put more into the sciences and specifically NASA.

Put hope back in to the future... not despair.
 
2012-03-09 02:25:05 PM  
awesome
 
2012-03-09 02:26:30 PM  
Nice job.
 
2012-03-09 02:26:51 PM  

Miithos: As a Canadian, i know how close the Us and Canada's beliefs, culture, and lives are linked.

I whole-heartedly applaud this. We do need to put more into the sciences and specifically NASA.

Put hope back in to the future... not despair.


Fark that. Let's bomb Iran!

YEEEEEEEEEHAW!

But seriously... While I don't think NASA should be priority #1, we need to increase our investments in science by a few orders of magnitude.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2012-03-09 02:27:17 PM  
I love listening to this man. Brilliant and personable. The one time I was in the audience for TDS, he was the guest.

/lucky, and know it
 
2012-03-09 02:28:25 PM  
I think of particular relevance are his remarks on the magnitude of NASA's funding compared to social programs. I wish he had gone for the military spending comparison but he's smart enough not to go there.

Also sorta funny, it's the first time I've seen him visibly rattled when giving a speech. I guess a Senate hearing will do that to you.
 
2012-03-09 02:29:22 PM  
I went to buy his new book last night and I had to ask a guy where it was. I kept asking for "Failure to Launch - The Dreams and Delusions of Space Enthusiasts" until I remember the publisher made him change the title. I do like the original title better.

/If you haven't checked out his podcast Star Talk I'd recommend it.
//He also has a great interview with Chris Hardwick of the Nerdist.
 
2012-03-09 02:30:50 PM  
He didn't wear the vest.

windycitizensports.files.wordpress.com

Doctor Tyson, I am disappoint.
 
2012-03-09 02:36:04 PM  

Winning: Slaxl: A bookmark for when I get home and can listen? Perhaps.

Here's a PDF transcript of his remarks.

Link (new window)


Here's a not .pdf of his remarks: Link (new window)
 
2012-03-09 02:36:15 PM  
I would vote for this man to be President of The World.
Why don't we elect thinkers, like him, to public office?



/Yes, I have a huge man-crush.
 
2012-03-09 02:38:42 PM  

hippyneil: I would vote for this man to be President of The World.
Why don't we elect thinkers, like him, to public office?



/Yes, I have a huge man-crush.


Because they are too smart to run.
 
2012-03-09 02:39:54 PM  
Dr. Tyson, I am writing you to tell you that your speech to the senate was great please write me back but not in cursive because I can't read in cursive.
 
2012-03-09 02:40:19 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Nye-Tyson 2012


i would vote that ticket in a heart beat

/and not because i want to go to mars
//ok, maybe some of that too
 
2012-03-09 02:40:25 PM  
"How much would you pay to "launch" our economy. How much
would you pay for the universe?"

That's just a great quote.
 
2012-03-09 02:41:29 PM  

hippyneil: I would vote for this man to be President of The World.
Why don't we elect thinkers, like him, to public office?


The world is run by "C" students. The "A" students are too busy being productive.
 
2012-03-09 02:44:44 PM  

Detinwolf: hippyneil: I would vote for this man to be President of The World.
Why don't we elect thinkers, like him, to public office?



/Yes, I have a huge man-crush.

Because they are too smart to run.


And, besides, there are people too stupid to vote for them.
 
2012-03-09 02:49:45 PM  
I
 
2012-03-09 02:50:36 PM  
Oops. That should read:

I <3 NEIL!
 
2012-03-09 02:52:59 PM  
What does it say about the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, that he goes before a Senate committee and essentially says he must be paid to have sex in space. What does that make him? It makes him a space slut, right? It makes him a space prostitute. He wants to be paid to have sex in space.
 
2012-03-09 02:54:40 PM  

Karmacidal: I have a mad geek crush of an overtly sexual nature on the brilliant Dr. Tyson.

/Oh yes, talk nerdy to me.


THIS. He makes science incredibly sexy.
 
2012-03-09 03:01:27 PM  
This is probably a bookmark.
 
2012-03-09 03:09:41 PM  

1000 Ways to Dye: I


1000 Ways to Dye: Oops. That should read:

I <3 NEIL!


Why didn't you just say, "I ♥ NEIL!"?
 
2012-03-09 03:22:46 PM  

Bleyo: Miithos: As a Canadian, i know how close the Us and Canada's beliefs, culture, and lives are linked.

I whole-heartedly applaud this. We do need to put more into the sciences and specifically NASA.

Put hope back in to the future... not despair.

Fark that. Let's bomb Iran!

YEEEEEEEEEHAW!

But seriously... While I don't think NASA should be priority #1, we need to increase our investments in science by a few orders of magnitude.


I bet they could get more funding if they offered a way to bomb Iran FROM space. Or maybe space dev will be moving more to other agencies... Link (new window)
 
2012-03-09 03:22:47 PM  

Wellon Dowd: [i.imgur.com image 640x352]

Nye-Tyson 2012


I just saw that episode for the first time a few months ago. It was awesome to see Dr. McKay interacting with my two biggest science heroes. And Dr. Keller in that short dress was hot!
 
2012-03-09 03:22:51 PM  

Kome: What does it say about the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, that he goes before a Senate committee and essentially says he must be paid to have sex in space. What does that make him? It makes him a space slut, right? It makes him a space prostitute. He wants to be paid to have sex in space.


Nice
 
2012-03-09 03:30:44 PM  

neritz: hippyneil: I would vote for this man to be President of The World.
Why don't we elect thinkers, like him, to public office?

The world is run by "C" students. The "A" students are too busy being productive.


that was 10, maybe 20 years ago, now it seems we've got d and f students in charge
 
2012-03-09 03:32:45 PM  

Bleyo:
But seriously... While I don't think NASA should be priority #1, we need to increase our investments in science by a few orders of magnitude.


Out of a 3.796 trillion dollar budget for 2012 we'll spend probably.

Close to 21 percent on Medicare/Medicaid

Close to 18 percent on Defense.

Closer to 2 percent than 3 percent on Education.

Less than 2 percent on Energy but closer to 1 percent.

Close to 0.47 percent on NASA

My point is that it isn't so much that NASA should be our top priority, I agree that there are many things that can revitalize our country including better transportation and an upgraded Infrastructure. We are though failing to be bold dreamers, and for what reason exactly? We're not interested anymore? The issue of it being too costly certainly doesn't make sense, 0.06 percent is too expensive? Hogwash.

China, Europe, Japan and Russia are going to continue to do these things whether we bow out or not. So we've got to decide as a nation whether we value science, whether we value being bold and doing things because they are hard.

The insanity of it is, that we're headed down this path not because we aren't capable or unable to pay for it. Its a small percent, we as consumers spend more on Booze, our pets, and cosmetics in one year then we do entirely on NASA.

Oh, I doubt NASA will ever be scrapped completely. Indeed, SLS and the path we're on right now is more likely to give NASA just enough to keep our aerospace industry happy. Whether the US though ever has another space station, flagship planetary mission, or anything else that is bold and exciting is less certain. This might be the golden age of exploration as we know it, and after 2020 or so what happens next? Does China begin to surpass us simply because we've given up? Do we want to be bold and great as a nation or not?
 
2012-03-09 03:33:11 PM  

Kome: What does it say about the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, that he goes before a Senate committee and essentially says he must be paid to have sex in space. What does that make him? It makes him a space slut, right? It makes him a space prostitute. He wants to be paid to have sex in space.


Admit it, you're pissed because he beat you to the idea....
 
2012-03-09 03:33:50 PM  

COMALite J: 1000 Ways to Dye: I

1000 Ways to Dye: Oops. That should read:

I <3 NEIL!

Why didn't you just say, "I ♥ NEIL!"?


Because he is in fact less then three Neils.
 
2012-03-09 03:37:56 PM  

hippyneil: Detinwolf: hippyneil: I would vote for this man to be President of The World.
Why don't we elect thinkers, like him, to public office?



/Yes, I have a huge man-crush.

Because they are too smart to run.

And, besides, there are people too stupid to vote for them.


I think people can make a better decision than you give them credit for.
Unfortunately, the well connected folks in charge of choosing our political options don't want a smart man. They want a person they can manipulate into making decisions that benefit their wealthy backers.

A capable candidate would have to overcome the lock both political machines have on our system and get on the ballot without being disgraced or assassinated in the process.
Most people really aren't interested in that. Not when they can do quite well for themselves from the sidelines.
 
2012-03-09 03:43:37 PM  

bbfreak: Do we want to be bold and great as a nation or not?


Unfortunately, I think far too many people simply do not care anymore. And if we are a nation that does not care, we deserve our fate of mediocrity.
 
2012-03-09 03:49:02 PM  

hippyneil: I would vote for this man to be President of The World.
Why don't we elect thinkers, like him, to public office?



/Yes, I have a huge man-crush.


Apparently there are a LOT of people who feel the same way about Dr. Tyson. He wrote in his blog about it. Here's the link if you're interested.

------
The question, "If I were President I'd..." implies that if you swap out one leader, put in another, then all will be well with America-as though our leaders are the cause of all ailments.

That must be why we've created a tradition of rampant attacks on our politicians. Are they too conservative for you? Too liberal? Too religious? Too atheist? Too gay? Too anti-gay? Too rich? Too dumb? Too smart? Too ethnic? Too philanderous? Curious behavior, given that we elect 88% of Congress every two years.

A second tradition-in-progress is the expectation that everyone else in our culturally pluralistic land should hold exactly your own outlook, on all issues.

When you're scientifically literate, the world looks different to you. It's a particular way of questioning what you see and hear. When empowered by this state of mind, objective realities matter. These are the truths of the world that exist outside of whatever your belief system tells you.

One objective reality is that our government doesn't work, not because we have dysfunctional politicians, but because we have dysfunctional voters. As a scientist and educator, my goal, then, is not to become President and lead a dysfunctional electorate, but to enlighten the electorate so they might choose the right leaders in the first place.

Neil deGrasse Tyson
New York, Aug. 21, 2011
 
2012-03-09 04:06:52 PM  
"The spending portfolio of the United States currently allocates fifty times as much money to social programs and education than it does to NASA."

It should be 1000 times as much - people actually need education and other social programs; manned space flight on the other hand, besides being a completely discretionary expense, is just about the most inefficient way imaginable to expand our knowledge of the Universe.

NASA's greatest accomplishment wasn't the Apollo moon missions, it was the Voyager probes - which together cost less to build than Neil Armstrong's moon suit.
 
2012-03-09 04:08:12 PM  
When I was a kid, I really expected that by now that I would be a crewman on some kind of space freighter.

It wouldn't have been nothing big. No flashy adventures. No epic space battles. No incredible feats. I'd probably be the guy doing the cooking and the laundry and the mopping. But I'd also get to step foot on Mars, Titan, Io, maybe Venus and Mercury too. Maybe have a gal waiting for me at every anchorage and a down payment on a retirement cottage at a L5 colony.

Sometimes, I wonder why I even look upwards at the sky anymore.
 
2012-03-09 04:11:43 PM  

way south: Most people really aren't interested in that. Not when they can do quite well for themselves from the sidelines.


Nabb1: Unfortunately, I think far too many people simply do not care anymore.


Bingo!

"What's in it for me?" "Why should MY taxes pay for that?"
 
2012-03-09 04:17:29 PM  

trippdogg: It should be 1000 times as much - people actually need education and other social programs;


Dr. Tyson's argument is that if you spent a fraction of what you spend on social programs to improve NASA's budget, you'd reap a much bigger harvest. He's not saying that you need to cut social programs. but if enough people WANT to go to school and GET jobs that aren't being outsourced to Malaysia, less people will rely on the social safety net.
 
2012-03-09 04:18:51 PM  

trippdogg: "The spending portfolio of the United States currently allocates fifty times as much money to social programs and education than it does to NASA."

It should be 1000 times as much - people actually need education and other social programs; manned space flight on the other hand, besides being a completely discretionary expense, is just about the most inefficient way imaginable to expand our knowledge of the Universe.

NASA's greatest accomplishment wasn't the Apollo moon missions, it was the Voyager probes - which together cost less to build than Neil Armstrong's moon suit.


True That, but they can't swing a golf club.

/Still, I disagree we should put men and women up there. We need names for schools when they get killed.
//Also I got to watch Voyager 2 launch when I was a kid. (3rd grade I think) My Dad had a kickass job back then.
 
2012-03-09 04:30:10 PM  

trippdogg: "The spending portfolio of the United States currently allocates fifty times as much money to social programs and education than it does to NASA."

It should be 1000 times as much - people actually need education and other social programs; manned space flight on the other hand, besides being a completely discretionary expense, is just about the most inefficient way imaginable to expand our knowledge of the Universe.

NASA's greatest accomplishment wasn't the Apollo moon missions, it was the Voyager probes - which together cost less to build than Neil Armstrong's moon suit.


but two probes, as awesome as they are. didn't inspire an entire generation. that's the point of manned exploration, of flag planting missions. to inspire.
 
2012-03-09 04:49:42 PM  

Via Infinito: Apparently there are a LOT of people who feel the same way about Dr. Tyson. He wrote in his blog about it. Here's the link if you're interested.


Well that just makes me like him even more.
 
2012-03-09 04:59:58 PM  

Bleyo: Miithos: As a Canadian, i know how close the Us and Canada's beliefs, culture, and lives are linked.

I whole-heartedly applaud this. We do need to put more into the sciences and specifically NASA.

Put hope back in to the future... not despair.

Fark that. Let's bomb Iran!

YEEEEEEEEEHAW!

But seriously... While I don't think NASA should be priority #1, we need to increase our investments in science by a few orders of magnitude.


In 500 years all that will be remembered of our efforts is the progress we make towards our future, which is in space. To stay on Earth, is to wither and die for a lack of understanding of statistics. In the far future the vast majority of our wealth, and all of our long term security lies off the Earth. There is nothing more important.
 
2012-03-09 05:03:38 PM  

COMALite J: 1000 Ways to Dye: I

1000 Ways to Dye: Oops. That should read:

I <3 NEIL!

Why didn't you just say, "I ♥ NEIL!"?


Because that's not a heart.
 
2012-03-09 05:05:48 PM  
I want in on the Dr. Tyson love-fest.

this man is incredible..... that is all.
 
2012-03-09 05:10:59 PM  
I'm none too fond of NASA. In lieu of advancing the frontiers of manned spaceflight, NASA spent a couple of decades wasting time and energy on the pretty-but-largely-useless shuttle program. The space shuttle could have been a worthwhile component of a larger drive toward orbital manufacturing, followed by exploring and exploiting the inner solar system. Could have been. What it turned into was a political show-horse which leeched desperately-needed funding from actual science and exploration projects and essentially crippled the US space industry when the photogenic but limited-utility orbiters were inevitably retired without a useful replacement vehicle. The stupidly wasted opportunities over the last three decades make my blood boil.

NASA has managed to pull off some staggeringly good science in spite of the shuttle debacle. Rovers on Mars; robot spacecraft visiting other planets, moons, and asteroids; orbiting sensors watching the solar weather; and the enormous work of searching for and tracking potential Earth-impactors were all getting accomplished during the lean years when the lion's share of the funding was poured down the shuttle rat-hole. Despite my misgivings about NASA management in general and the shuttle program in particular, the non-shuttle folks at the agency have been almost textbook examples of making bricks without straw. My mixed feelings about NASA aside, I am firmly convinced that a robust presence in space- specifically meaning more than just low-Earth orbit- is a key underpinning to continued US economic and military superiority.

The US got a huge amount of payback for the money spent on the Space Race in terms of follow-on technologies and spin-offs. We also got the infrastructure to maintain a constellation of satellites which continue to provide vital real-world service for our high-tech civilization. Learning how to put men on the moon taught us how to safely and reliably put stuff into orbit, which in turn gave us the ability to see and hear most of what goes on all over the world. This ability- taken for granted by the average American citizen- is literally priceless, and gives the US an enormous military advantage in preventing or fighting future conflicts. Our ability to see/listen-in on potential enemies and communicate with friendly units anywhere on the planet is a direct result of the US space program. Our current military peerlessness is based on it.

Despite all of this well-documented benefit from the space program, there are loads of people in this country who are chomping at the bit to gut or eliminate the US space program in a stupid rush to be penny-wise and pound-foolish. The Apollo program cost the equivalent of about $200.oo per US citizen when it was running. This was (and is) a bargain of stellar magnitude by any measure, but there are people in this country- sadly including many of our professional political class- who shriek and gibber about "wasting" money on space when we could be spending that money on vote-buying schemes here on Earth. The space program has delivered proven real-world benefits for the money. Can our military adventures in the Middle East make the same claim?

When the current administration chose to retire the shuttle fleet, I was among many who were unhappy with the decision (they were lovely bits of engineering, and I'm a sucker for well-designed equipment), but accepted it under the assumption that the budget formerly allocated to the shuttle fleet might be turned to more useful ends at NASA. That assumption turned out to be so much wishful thinking. The people I once chastised for what I deemed hyperbole about "abandoning space" turn out to have been correct, as shown by the latest budget proposal from the White House.

In a time when the US is falling behind in science and engineering- historically American strong suits- the President has decided to throw the fiscal worrywarts a bone called NASA. In the interest of appearing to be financially prudent, the President is scaling back the poster child for American engineering and technological progress. How many kids will struggle through the tough scholastic requirements for engineering and the sciences when the biggest market for those fields is cutting back funding? Fewer NASA programs means fewer companies will be getting money to design and build spacecraft. Those companies will therefore have a reduced interest in hiring new engineers and technicians. Tighter NASA science budgets mean fewer science missions, which in turn mean less interest on the part of universities and businesses to employ scientists. Fewer engineers, scientists, and technicians being hired reduces the need for students of those disciplines. So much for American excellence in engineering and the sciences. The one thing America is traditionally good at is being put at risk to create the impression of fiscal restraint.

You want fiscal prudence? Try trimming back on wasteful military adventures. Stop paying farmers to not grow food. Stop paying those farmers who do grow food to turn perfectly good corn into largely useless ethanol for fuel. Trimming a few million dollars from a few NASA programs is the height of folly when we waste billions on the items I just mentioned. And those are just the ones I thought of while typing. Anyone willing to do a little research could almost certainly find more. Please do, by the way.

Reducing America's presence in space- which is what the current budget amounts to- is a bold statement to the effect that the US is no longer looking outward. We're no longer interested in pushing the boundaries of what we can do, because we seem to be more interested in wallowing around in what we can't. This attitude has historically been a symptom of a civilization in decline. I'm not interested in contributing to the decline of the United States of America. I'm interested in science and engineering and technology, not least because those things make life better for everyone- including Americans. As an American, I want to do well while doing good. The technology we build today will help feed, clothe, and heal the people of tomorrow. Reducing the overall level of misery on the planet also reduces the competition for resources and the need for military genital measuring contests. This helps make the world to come safer and more stable than the world we live in now.

Why us? Why should America expend the time, money, and manpower to maintain a presence in space? Because- flawed and occasionally idiotic as we may collectively be- a future with an America strong in technology and the sciences is more likely to be a better future than one built in the absence of a US presence in space. Rest assured, humans are going to explore and exploit the solar system. I think it would be better for humanity as a whole if the ones who speak English didn't have to use foreign currencies to buy tickets as passengers on another country's spacecraft.

/tl:dr version- science is cool, cutting science spending is uncool
 
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