If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Digital Life)   Symantec's "lost" cell phone experiments proves one thing: don't lose your phone. Not only will you likely never see it again, but everything on it will get accessed   (digitallife.today.msnbc.msn.com) divider line 46
    More: Obvious, Symantec, Santa Monica Pier, East L.A., SD Card, ecological successions, application software, emails  
•       •       •

3887 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Mar 2012 at 1:00 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-03-08 10:02:52 AM
PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

Use a remote-wipe utility, if possible. Set the PIN lock to wipe the phone after several failed attempts, if possible.

Also, if you lose your smartphone, consider it gone forever. Yes, there are apps that let you track the device, but assuming the phone is gone forever leads to less disappointment when you can't track it down.
 
2012-03-08 10:36:59 AM

cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.


All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).
 
2012-03-08 11:26:54 AM

MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).


My iphone allows emergency calls even though it's pin locked. When you slide to the left, there's a button on the passcode entry page that says "Emergency Call" in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Not sure about other phones though.
 
2012-03-08 12:40:07 PM

Pfactor: MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).

My iphone allows emergency calls even though it's pin locked. When you slide to the left, there's a button on the passcode entry page that says "Emergency Call" in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Not sure about other phones though.


That doesn't allow for calls to family members... Only to 911 (or the local equivalent).
 
2012-03-08 12:53:09 PM
and this is

Pfactor: MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).

My iphone allows emergency calls even though it's pin locked. When you slide to the left, there's a button on the passcode entry page that says "Emergency Call" in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Not sure about other phones though.


My Android phone is locked and has tracking software, though that only works if the phone is turned on. Take out the battery and it's gone.

I keep emergency contact numbers in my wallet, just for such an emergency. A bystander or EMR wouldn't know which number in my phone to call anyway. And my phone, and I'm assuming other Android phones, allow for emergency calls even if locked.
 
2012-03-08 01:00:57 PM

timujin: My Android phone is locked and has tracking software, though that only works if the phone is turned on. Take out the battery and it's gone.


Yeah that's a real nuisance. I had my phone stolen, and 3 co-workers have also had phones pinched in a coordinated spate of distraction style robberies from offices, each time I go "let me track them with my awesome skills", load up the software and go "ah, they've turned the phone off. Drat, foiled again".

Really annoys me :( I wrote an email to HTC asking them to make phones remotely detonatable, so we can explode criminals. They refused. I was most upset.
 
2012-03-08 01:10:53 PM
Part of my job is supporting Exchange to sync with corporate phones. As part that, we usually get a few lost/stolen phones every week. In nearly all cases, they ask for the remote wipe usually 5 to 7 days after the phone is gone. We take a look at the logs and the phone has not contacted the server in many days. Most typically the time period of last contact corresponds to about a single battery charge from the point the phone was lost.

We are then asked what can be done to keep the phone 'secure' and wipe it anyway...

//bonus is that often these are the same people that have complained about us forcing PIN lock and handset encryption...
 
2012-03-08 01:10:57 PM
Cell phones processors have reached the point where encryption wouldn't be a bottleneck compared to say, communicating with flash memory... Maybe cell phone OS development teams need to start making *every* storage encrypted.

It wouldn't even be a big change... Replace a few read / write functions in the API with encrypted ones.

Of course, that would make it all too easy to lock yourself out of your data, but there's ways around that such as having the software you use to connect to your PC provide a local key escrow.
 
2012-03-08 01:12:18 PM
I'll admit, I snooped around phones I've found. I consider it my finders fee in letting my voyeur side run free for a bit.

However, I do return all the phones I find.
 
2012-03-08 01:17:28 PM
Lookout Mobile Security for Android FTW.

/remotely turn on GPS, shows location on Google Maps
//fortunately have never had to use it, besides testing it to see if it works
 
2012-03-08 01:18:07 PM

wingnut396: Part of my job is supporting Exchange to sync with corporate phones. As part that, we usually get a few lost/stolen phones every week. In nearly all cases, they ask for the remote wipe usually 5 to 7 days after the phone is gone. We take a look at the logs and the phone has not contacted the server in many days. Most typically the time period of last contact corresponds to about a single battery charge from the point the phone was lost.

We are then asked what can be done to keep the phone 'secure' and wipe it anyway...

//bonus is that often these are the same people that have complained about us forcing PIN lock and handset encryption...


My only complaint about forcing PIN lock is that my organization doesn't allow pattern unlock. It HAS to be a PIN. Of course, most people put in a pin of 5555 or something. There's no "PIN strength" test like a password requirement.
 
2012-03-08 01:22:14 PM
What would you do if you found a smartphone on the subway or at a coffee shop? If you're like most Americans, you'd rummage through the phone looking for photos, emails and even private banking information. And the chances are only 50-50 that you would try to return the phone.

What the fark? How about, take it up to the counter and tell the cashier, "hey, I found this phone on one of the tables"? What the fark is wrong with people?
 
2012-03-08 01:22:26 PM
fc07.deviantart.net

/pic is hot, like Irene Adler
 
2012-03-08 01:23:06 PM
As soon as I see Symantec I think, 'oh, the guys who sells those viruses for your computer'...
 
2012-03-08 01:24:23 PM

Bunnyhat: I'll admit, I snooped around phones I've found. I consider it my finders fee in letting my voyeur side run free for a bit.
However, I do return all the phones I find.


I havent found a phone, but I know I'd look for sexy photos, and then try and return the phone.
 
2012-03-08 01:31:33 PM

redpanda2: My only complaint about forcing PIN lock is that my organization doesn't allow pattern unlock. It HAS to be a PIN. Of course, most people put in a pin of 5555 or something. There's no "PIN strength" test like a password requirement.


Assuming your org is on Exchange...

The ActiveSync protocol is not coded to use swipe unlock. I would guess that it is because each manufacturer started implementing it differently. As for as the easy PIN, that is a setting that can be unchecked in the password policy so that it won't accept stuff like 1234 or whatever.
 
2012-03-08 01:36:32 PM
Now ask people if, not when, they backup their phone data.
 
2012-03-08 01:36:33 PM
Those location finder things seem to be pretty worthless.

People always seem to hold out for a few days hoping they'd find the phone and, by the time they actually use the remote wipe/find tools...battery is dead and the thing is off or has been wiped.
 
2012-03-08 01:37:38 PM

Bukharin: I havent found a phone, but I know I'd look for sexy photos, and then try and return the phone.


Same here. I don't see myself bothering with any banking or other financial info. Nothing to see there that doesn't lead to massive legal problems.
 
2012-03-08 01:42:17 PM
No photos, no banking info, no addresses, no credit cards. Just a few dozen phone numbers.
 
2012-03-08 01:46:22 PM

timujin: I keep emergency contact numbers in my wallet, just for such an emergency. A bystander or EMR wouldn't know which number in my phone to call anyway. And my phone, and I'm assuming other Android phones, allow for emergency calls even if locked.


I figure if they call the last called number or the most called number on my phone they'd almost certainly get someone that can help.
 
2012-03-08 01:47:14 PM

IrateShadow: Bukharin: I havent found a phone, but I know I'd look for sexy photos, and then try and return the phone.

Same here. I don't see myself bothering with any banking or other financial info. Nothing to see there that doesn't lead to massive legal problems.


You're not the only ones. FTA: Some 43 percent of finders clicked on an app labeled "online banking." And 53 percent clicked on a filed named "HR salaries." A file named "saved passwords" was opened by 57 percent of finders. Social networking tools and personal e-mail were checked by 60 percent. And a folder labeled "private photos" tempted 72 percent.
 
2012-03-08 01:49:59 PM

Tax Boy: [fc07.deviantart.net image 640x960]

/pic is hot, like Irene Adler


Oh hey that reminds me I've got two more of those episodes to watch at some point, sweet.
 
2012-03-08 01:53:39 PM

Teenwolf: You're not the only ones.


It does give me an idea though. When I get home tonight, I'm putting a "personal photos" folder on my phone that has a couple of amateur pics to throw off the overview thumbnails and then a whole lot of tubgirl.
 
2012-03-08 01:54:19 PM
doesn't anyone still memorize the numbers they need? And hell, if you aren't using your brain to memorize shiat, then that should theoretically free up brain cells to keep track of the phone.

I guess not everyone is as awesome as me
 
2012-03-08 01:55:04 PM

timujin: and this is Pfactor: MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).

My iphone allows emergency calls even though it's pin locked. When you slide to the left, there's a button on the passcode entry page that says "Emergency Call" in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Not sure about other phones though.

My Android phone is locked and has tracking software, though that only works if the phone is turned on. Take out the battery and it's gone.

I keep emergency contact numbers in my wallet, just for such an emergency. A bystander or EMR wouldn't know which number in my phone to call anyway. And my phone, and I'm assuming other Android phones, allow for emergency calls even if locked.


This is why you attach the term ICE (In Case of Emergency) to your emergency contacts....I've had EMT friends tell me to do this for years..

Also, if you lock your phone (unless you attach your contact info external to the phone), it will always be gone if lost. Install a tracker to help your odds, and hope you're one of the 50% who otherwise gets contacted by the finder....

/and who the hell keeps unencrypted banking information on their phones
//seriously, do you record your account and routing number along with passwords in text file?
 
2012-03-08 01:59:39 PM

Sasquach: /and who the hell keeps unencrypted banking information on their phones


A lot of banks have smartphone apps that use your web passwords. I've never used one, but if they store your password, someone should be able to pull off your statements and cancelled checks ,which would give them more than enough info.
 
2012-03-08 02:15:27 PM
Of the things they mentioned I think a few of them are legit.

Personal photos - take a look around and see if the person or someone in a phot is nearby... most of the time when you find a phone in the open it has JUST been left behind.


Social networking - same deal. I would even put a status message up asking for help locating the phones owner

HR Files - could be helpful returning the phone to a business

Personal Email - also can figure out what the last thing that was sent

Honestly is this any worse than finding someones wallet and looking through the contents?
 
2012-03-08 02:30:18 PM

MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).


They should be able to get your info from your carrier by your IMEI number.
 
2012-03-08 02:31:46 PM
If I found a smartphone the FIRST thing I'd do is open the photos and look for some titties. You would too.
 
2012-03-08 02:41:07 PM

cmunic8r99: Pfactor: MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).

My iphone allows emergency calls even though it's pin locked. When you slide to the left, there's a button on the passcode entry page that says "Emergency Call" in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Not sure about other phones though.

That doesn't allow for calls to family members... Only to 911 (or the local equivalent).


Huh. On my Droid 2 you can designate contacts as emergency contacts, which you can access when the phone is locked. Not sure if that's an Android thing or a Moto thing. I also set contact info for my android tablet that displays on the lock screen.
 
2012-03-08 02:42:19 PM
Is there where I post smugly about how I dont use cell phones or tv or any electronic device?
 
2012-03-08 02:49:59 PM

redpanda2: cmunic8r99: Pfactor: MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).

My iphone allows emergency calls even though it's pin locked. When you slide to the left, there's a button on the passcode entry page that says "Emergency Call" in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Not sure about other phones though.

That doesn't allow for calls to family members... Only to 911 (or the local equivalent).

Huh. On my Droid 2 you can designate contacts as emergency contacts, which you can access when the phone is locked. Not sure if that's an Android thing or a Moto thing. I also set contact info for my android tablet that displays on the lock screen.


I've got the same Emergency Contact thing on my Droid X2, but again, could just be Moto; I don't know that I've seen it on another Android phone.
 
2012-03-08 03:04:31 PM

pastorkius: redpanda2: cmunic8r99: Pfactor: MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).

My iphone allows emergency calls even though it's pin locked. When you slide to the left, there's a button on the passcode entry page that says "Emergency Call" in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Not sure about other phones though.

That doesn't allow for calls to family members... Only to 911 (or the local equivalent).

Huh. On my Droid 2 you can designate contacts as emergency contacts, which you can access when the phone is locked. Not sure if that's an Android thing or a Moto thing. I also set contact info for my android tablet that displays on the lock screen.

I've got the same Emergency Contact thing on my Droid X2, but again, could just be Moto; I don't know that I've seen it on another Android phone.


Huh... I'll have check my SGS2 and see if it does that.
 
2012-03-08 03:19:09 PM

MarshHawk: cmunic8r99: PIN lock your phone. No, it won't keep everyone out, but it will keep most out. You don't lock stuff up to keep thieves out - you lock it to keep honest people out.

All good advice, but there is a valid counter-argument... what if you suffer a medical emergency, and by-standers or first responders need to contact someone in your cell phone? A PIN could prevent them from doing so.

That being said, I do use a PIN. Seems the likelihood of my leaving my phone laying around is higher than an emergency (I hope).


That's up there with "Sealtbelts kill people too" on the list of dumb counterarguments.
 
2012-03-08 03:19:39 PM
Hmm...I wonder how they scored my habit of pounding found electronics, including cell phones into scrap with a hammer?
 
2012-03-08 03:51:33 PM
While I returned all the 6 phones I've found over the years, of course I've opened them to see what's on it & add a few buttcrack pictures to the photo gallery.
 
2012-03-08 04:09:58 PM
Absolutely guarantee I will browse through all of the photos on any phone I find...that is the small price you pay for losing your phone. I don't feel it is wrong in any way and fully expect my (unlocked) phone to be completely browsed if I lost it...I would not go snooping in their bank info or try to login to their accounts, since that IS wrong. If I found a wallet, I'd also look at the photos in there too (who wouldn't?)

I will also absolutely do my damn best to locate the owner, call the last number dialed, etc...if it's unlocked it would probably take me 5 minutes to determine the owner. I could also post to his/her facebook wall with my info, etc...so many options.

P.S. If the photos on the phone are kiddie porn, you bet it's going to the police.
 
2012-03-08 04:10:40 PM
P.S.S. I would quite possibly add a buttcrack pic to the photo cache, as mentioned above.
 
2012-03-08 06:46:50 PM

IrateShadow: Sasquach: /and who the hell keeps unencrypted banking information on their phones

A lot of banks have smartphone apps that use your web passwords. I've never used one, but if they store your password, someone should be able to pull off your statements and cancelled checks ,which would give them more than enough info.


I've got two banking apps on my phone and they do not store your username or password. I would have deleted them in a heartbeat if they did. I also don't use them on public wi-fi.
 
2012-03-08 07:30:45 PM
Since a lot of the phones were wiped, wouldn't it stand to reason that the sort of person who is most likely to pick up a phone that is not theirs is also the sort of person that would be most likely to steal a phone?

I bet they would get a lot better than 50% recovery if they planted the phone in such a way that the entire population was sampled, not just assholes that pick up other people's phones.
 
2012-03-08 08:04:06 PM
I would really like it if I could separately PIN-lock the email section of my phone... that's pretty much the only thing I wouldn't want someone rummaging through, or more to the point, vandalizing.

Everything else is pretty much meh... you really want to look at my cat pictures, knock yourself out. But having email maliciously deleted would suck.
 
2012-03-08 11:52:04 PM
It's things like this that remind me that my fellow man is a son of a biscuit and deserves nothing but scorn. I would just call someone important on the contact list and say " Hey! Some fool you know lost his phone!". Nearly everyone else would see the phone less as a communications device and more as an opportunity for crime. Mine is password locked and set to erase itself after 10 attempts, or if I set it off remotely. I only wish I could make it explode so that whatever thieving lowlife takes my phone ends up with a deficit of fingers for their trouble. Or maybe it could go off when they're making a long distance call to their friends in Transylvania. Picture it: "Hello boys, is Jerzy! I found phone! It is very hot!" KABOOM "Ow!"
 
2012-03-09 12:14:08 AM
I'm too lazy to lock my phone with a pin/pass/pattern, there I said it.

That said I don't plan on losing it. I've said it before I think girls have a tougher time with this because of social convention. Phones get swiped from purses all of the time and I can see not wanting to bring your purse to the bathroom or whatever.

For me my phone is either in my pocket or sitting directly in front of me at all times (it stays in the pocket in crowded places like bars, common sense). Yeah I guess you could grab it from right in front of me and run away right out in the open, but that would be pretty bold.

What kind of banking app would even have the option of saving passwords? Mine saves the account number only and it is starred out. Exchange account I can wipe myself from the OWA site should it ever come to that. Nothing else on the phone really matters.
 
2012-03-09 10:29:28 AM
I don't have a cell phone.
My next door neighbor's 5 y.o. kid has an Ipod.
He runs up to me and says, "Guess the password?"
I get it right every time he changes it.
He's going to learn security.
 
2012-03-09 11:43:42 AM
I haven't lost my phone before, but count me among the people who use a 4-digit PIN lock.

If I do lose it, I can at least use the "Find My iPhone" feature to have the phone make a noise and even display a message on its screen asking the finder to call me (using his/her own phone, presumably).

If it's found by a thief, well, it's gone. But if it's found by a regular nice person, I'm reasonably hopeful I'll get it back.
 
Displayed 46 of 46 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report