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(Sly Oyster)   The actual most astounding fact of the universe is that Neil DeGrasse Tyson is smarter and more profound than subby. Or something about how the universe is inside us   (slyoyster.com) divider line 84
    More: Interesting, universe, profound  
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4006 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Mar 2012 at 11:13 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-06 10:08:46 AM  
...and you must learn to master your rage.. or rage will become your master.
 
2012-03-06 10:24:48 AM  
NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.
 
2012-03-06 10:56:32 AM  
Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering. - Arthur C. Clarke
 
2012-03-06 11:23:59 AM  
i3.kym-cdn.com


\you knew it was coming
 
2012-03-06 11:26:15 AM  

W. T. Fark: Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering. - Arthur C. Clarke


My wallpaper at work is the Hubble Deep Field. When my coworkers barge into my office and ask what it is, I explain that it's a relatively uninteresting portion of sky near Orion about the size of one's thumb from one's outstretched arm. Every dot and blob there is a galaxy millions and billions of light years away, each containing millions and millions of stars. Each star could have multiple planets circling it leading to the possibility that in this tiny, tiny portion of the sky, there's another planet out there somewhere with a guy sitting at a desk who is NOT BEING BOTHERED BY AN IDIOT COWORKER!
 
2012-03-06 11:27:22 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.


I'm beginning to agree. Sagan, Feynman, Tyson...

...am I the only one who thinks Brian Greene isn't as awesome as everyone thinks he is? Not that he's not 1304984 times smarter than I am, just...yeah.
 
2012-03-06 11:28:21 AM  
Just a short quote from this interview.

I like his parenting advice as well.
 
2012-03-06 11:28:21 AM  
The bagel I had for breakfast is part of the universe, so yes, yes it is.
 
2012-03-06 11:28:26 AM  
Tyson, isn't he that chicken guy?
 
2012-03-06 11:32:44 AM  

Lord Dimwit: DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.

I'm beginning to agree. Sagan, Feynman, Tyson...

...am I the only one who thinks Brian Greene isn't as awesome as everyone thinks he is? Not that he's not 1304984 times smarter than I am, just...yeah.


He may not have the raw charisma of NDT or Carl Sagan, but the series of NOVA
specials he did about theoretical physics are some of the most accessible
explanations of the subject for the lay person I've ever seen.
 
2012-03-06 11:38:25 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: W. T. Fark: Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering. - Arthur C. Clarke

My wallpaper at work is the Hubble Deep Field. When my coworkers barge into my office and ask what it is, I explain that it's a relatively uninteresting portion of sky near Orion about the size of one's thumb from one's outstretched arm. Every dot and blob there is a galaxy millions and billions of light years away, each containing millions and millions of stars. Each star could have multiple planets circling it leading to the possibility that in this tiny, tiny portion of the sky, there's another planet out there somewhere with a guy sitting at a desk who is NOT BEING BOTHERED BY AN IDIOT COWORKER!


I always tell my wife that she should be happy - she makes up 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000003 of the Universe (going on the current estimates of the total mass of the Universe and assuming she's lost all the baby weight), and yet she gets to be conscious, aware, and alive, while, statistically speaking, the rest of the Universe is dead.

It doesn't help. She doesn't care about the big picture. She cares that she's not happy over...whatever it is she's unhappy about at the time. I just think we're lucky.

(Think about how Bokonon put it in Cat's Cradle.)
 
2012-03-06 11:38:31 AM  

Lord Dimwit: DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.

I'm beginning to agree. Sagan, Feynman, Tyson...

...am I the only one who thinks Brian Greene isn't as awesome as everyone thinks he is? Not that he's not 1304984 times smarter than I am, just...yeah.


Read Brian's books, they're really good.

Neil is a funny guy and really cool, but I personally wouldn't put him on par with Sagan... not until he does writes like him or produces television like him.
 
2012-03-06 11:42:58 AM  
Tyson has always been a demi-god in my pantheon. Over the last few weeks he has proven himself worthy of the position of God.

He now is welcome among great men such as Segan, Dawkins, Randi, Hawking, Joe Pesci and a few others.

Congrats Tyson ...you're farking awesome.
 
2012-03-06 11:44:15 AM  

Perlin Noise: Segan, Dawkins, Randi, Hawking, Joe Pesci


One of these is not like the others.

(It's Randi.)
 
2012-03-06 11:44:20 AM  
Well, he most certainly would have written a better headline, that's for sure.
 
2012-03-06 11:44:38 AM  
Subby's not even as profound as Miley Cyrus. :(
 
2012-03-06 11:45:44 AM  

Lord Dimwit: DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.

I'm beginning to agree. Sagan, Feynman, Tyson...

...am I the only one who thinks Brian Greene isn't as awesome as everyone thinks he is? Not that he's not 1304984 times smarter than I am, just...yeah.


Yeah, but he was awesome on The Sarah Connor Chronicles.
 
2012-03-06 11:46:01 AM  

Perlin Noise: He now is welcome among great men such as Segan, Dawkins, Randi, Hawking, Joe Pesci and a few others.


Am I the only one who wants to be a fly on the wall while that poker game plays out? I don't care if it sounds like a Family Guy bit, I think it'd be funny.
 
2012-03-06 11:48:50 AM  

Perlin Noise: Tyson has always been a demi-god in my pantheon. Over the last few weeks he has proven himself worthy of the position of God.

He now is welcome among great men such as Segan, Dawkins, Randi, Hawking, Joe Pesci and a few others.

Congrats Tyson ...you're farking awesome.


God? really?
 
2012-03-06 11:48:58 AM  

AmorousRedDragon: Lord Dimwit: DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.

I'm beginning to agree. Sagan, Feynman, Tyson...

...am I the only one who thinks Brian Greene isn't as awesome as everyone thinks he is? Not that he's not 1304984 times smarter than I am, just...yeah.

Read Brian's books, they're really good.

Neil is a funny guy and really cool, but I personally wouldn't put him on par with Sagan... not until he does writes like him or produces television like him.


Well, Sagan wasn't as good as Sagan when he was starting out either. Give Tyson some time to grow into the role. I think he's doing an admirable job so far.

Plus, I think we tend to look back with rose colored glasses. I'm a big fan of Carl Sagan, but he wasn't the be-all, end-all of science popularization. Having said that, The Demon Haunted World should be required reading by all high school students.
 
2012-03-06 11:55:26 AM  

Lord Dimwit: One of these is not like the others.


HAHA ...I can't help it. James Randi may be a bit of an asshole ...but there are many types of gods ;)

He is the god of "not suffering the fools".

Segan: God of wonder and learning
Hawking: God of brains
Pesci: God of getting things done
Dawkins: God of being reasonable
Wozniak: Demi-God of nerds

etc. etc. etc.
 
2012-03-06 11:57:26 AM  
One thing NDT has over CS: Carl could seem a bit serious and, at the risk of making a death joke, well, *STIFF* on screen. Neil seems more relaxed and personable in his delivery.
 
2012-03-06 11:58:25 AM  

AmorousRedDragon: God? really?


Its seems you don't quite understand my meaning by "God"

Here is an explaination: Link (new window)
 
2012-03-06 12:07:19 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: He may not have the raw charisma of NDT or Carl Sagan, but the series of NOVA
specials he did about theoretical physics are some of the most accessible
explanations of the subject for the lay person I've ever seen.


His favorite Street Shark is Ripster.
 
2012-03-06 12:09:36 PM  

AmorousRedDragon: Lord Dimwit: DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.

I'm beginning to agree. Sagan, Feynman, Tyson...

...am I the only one who thinks Brian Greene isn't as awesome as everyone thinks he is? Not that he's not 1304984 times smarter than I am, just...yeah.

Read Brian's books, they're really good.

Neil is a funny guy and really cool, but I personally wouldn't put him on par with Sagan... not until he does writes like him or produces television like him.


I disagree: NDT is just as good as Carl Sagan at bringing science education
to the masses. He is just as good a writer, and his work as the host of NOVA
SCIENCE NOW stands up to COSMOS, though NSN doesn't have the sort of
timelessness that COSMOS does.

And, the man can TALK. Having had the priviledge of socializing with him on a
number of occasions, I can assure you that what you see on TV or in formal
presentations is pretty much the way the man can express himself at all times,
even with his family (whom I have also had the pleasure of meeting). With him
its no act: what you see is him all the time, and the amount of sheer science
knowledge he has at his instant command and his eloquence of off-the-cuff
speech is truly staggering.
 
2012-03-06 12:11:19 PM  
NDT needs to run for President.
 
2012-03-06 12:13:04 PM  

badLogic: NDT needs to run for President.


Alas for us, he's too smart for that I think.
 
2012-03-06 12:20:03 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: AmorousRedDragon: Lord Dimwit: DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.

I'm beginning to agree. Sagan, Feynman, Tyson...

...am I the only one who thinks Brian Greene isn't as awesome as everyone thinks he is? Not that he's not 1304984 times smarter than I am, just...yeah.

Read Brian's books, they're really good.

Neil is a funny guy and really cool, but I personally wouldn't put him on par with Sagan... not until he does writes like him or produces television like him.

I disagree: NDT is just as good as Carl Sagan at bringing science education
to the masses. He is just as good a writer, and his work as the host of NOVA
SCIENCE NOW stands up to COSMOS, though NSN doesn't have the sort of
timelessness that COSMOS does.

And, the man can TALK. Having had the priviledge of socializing with him on a
number of occasions, I can assure you that what you see on TV or in formal
presentations is pretty much the way the man can express himself at all times,
even with his family (whom I have also had the pleasure of meeting). With him
its no act: what you see is him all the time, and the amount of sheer science
knowledge he has at his instant command and his eloquence of off-the-cuff
speech is truly staggering.


I'm envious! I never said he isn't a brilliant guy and doesn't do a lot to popularize science... you just have to realize how much I love Carl Sagan. I've liked him for most of my life, I've read most of his books and owe a lot of my understanding of the world to him, in all earnestness. They're just really big shoes to fill and even though I really like Neil, I just don't have the same personal connection to him as I do Sagan.

Perlin Noise: AmorousRedDragon: God? really?

Its seems you don't quite understand my meaning by "God"

Here is an explaination: Link (new window)


Not sure how that was supposed to clarify it lol... look I get the figurative usage I just don't have the same feelings about it.
 
2012-03-06 12:20:13 PM  
Meh. Yakko Warner did it first (new window)
 
2012-03-06 12:32:21 PM  
reknowned?
 
2012-03-06 12:33:05 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: W. T. Fark: Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering. - Arthur C. Clarke

My wallpaper at work is the Hubble Deep Field. When my coworkers barge into my office and ask what it is, I explain that it's a relatively uninteresting portion of sky near Orion about the size of one's thumb from one's outstretched arm. Every dot and blob there is a galaxy millions and billions of light years away, each containing millions and millions of stars. Each star could have multiple planets circling it leading to the possibility that in this tiny, tiny portion of the sky, there's another planet out there somewhere with a guy sitting at a desk who is NOT BEING BOTHERED BY AN IDIOT COWORKER!


You're off by a pretty large margin on the size - according to wiki it's "It covers an area 2.5 arcminutes across, two parts in a million of the whole sky, which is equivalent in angular size to a 65 mm tennis ball at a distance of 100 metres."

So unless you're thumb is incredibly small, it's an even more impressive picture than you thought.

/I've usually heard it described as a grain of sand at arm's length, but that might have been the Ultra Deep Field.
 
2012-03-06 12:39:07 PM  
There's a little Godzilla in all of us.
 
2012-03-06 12:41:44 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: W. T. Fark: Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering. - Arthur C. Clarke

My wallpaper at work is the Hubble Deep Field. When my coworkers barge into my office and ask what it is, I explain that it's a relatively uninteresting portion of sky near Orion about the size of one's thumb from one's outstretched arm. Every dot and blob there is a galaxy millions and billions of light years away, each containing millions and millions of stars. Each star could have multiple planets circling it leading to the possibility that in this tiny, tiny portion of the sky, there's another planet out there somewhere with a guy sitting at a desk who is NOT BEING BOTHERED BY AN IDIOT COWORKER!


Hey I have that same wallpaper! Actually I alternate between that and a representation of the d(z^2) orbital shopped next to Eta Carinae, that's a total mind melter there.
 
2012-03-06 12:42:13 PM  

AmorousRedDragon: Not sure how that was supposed to clarify it lol... look I get the figurative usage I just don't have the same feelings about it.


Sure, that makes sense. It's just there there are so precious few people these days that exemplify the rewards of being smart/educated/reasonable (and are popularized by the general public). I tend to give them an enormous amount of credit as a means to encourage us to celebrate their efforts.
 
2012-03-06 12:43:02 PM  

Sir Vanderhoot: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: W. T. Fark: Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering. - Arthur C. Clarke

My wallpaper at work is the Hubble Deep Field. When my coworkers barge into my office and ask what it is, I explain that it's a relatively uninteresting portion of sky near Orion about the size of one's thumb from one's outstretched arm. Every dot and blob there is a galaxy millions and billions of light years away, each containing millions and millions of stars. Each star could have multiple planets circling it leading to the possibility that in this tiny, tiny portion of the sky, there's another planet out there somewhere with a guy sitting at a desk who is NOT BEING BOTHERED BY AN IDIOT COWORKER!

You're off by a pretty large margin on the size - according to wiki it's "It covers an area 2.5 arcminutes across, two parts in a million of the whole sky, which is equivalent in angular size to a 65 mm tennis ball at a distance of 100 metres."

So unless you'reyour thumb is incredibly small, it's an even more impressive picture than you thought.

/I've usually heard it described as a grain of sand at arm's length, but that might have been the Ultra Deep Field.


Well I just feel silly.
 
2012-03-06 01:06:16 PM  

Cagey B: There's a little Godzilla in all of us.


Nuh-uh. I had a Gojirectomy when I was a kid.
 
2012-03-06 01:10:18 PM  
The actual most astounding fact of the universe is that Neil DeGrasse Tyson is smarter and more profound than subby.

I'd be willing to bet I've wiped things off my truck smarter than subby.

Maybe I'm a little jaded, but "We are all made of stars" is old and not as profound as it used to be.

You want profound? It won't be in words trying to be profound. It'll be something said in passing.
 
2012-03-06 01:11:04 PM  
NDT is awesome and all, but personally, I think that Brian Cox is the best populariser of science out there at the moment. Just listening to him wax lyrically in his northern accent about the universe just makes you know that things will only get better. His mountaintop stances are far more majestic, he's friggin hilarious on The Infinite Monkey Cage, and the show he did on quantum mechanics over christmas had me gobsmacked.

Yeah, I might have a bit of a man-crush on him. NTTAWWT
 
2012-03-06 01:13:57 PM  

Sir Vanderhoot: You're off by a pretty large margin on the size - according to wiki it's "It covers an area 2.5 arcminutes across, two parts in a million of the whole sky, which is equivalent in angular size to a 65 mm tennis ball at a distance of 100 metres."


Yeah, but, remember: I'm not working with the smartest folk to begin with.
 
2012-03-06 01:19:26 PM  

wildcardjack: You want profound? It won't be in words trying to be profound. It'll be something said in passing.


Like "Move out of the way, Granny!" said-in-passing, or "You stay, I go" said-in-passing?
 
2012-03-06 01:20:27 PM  
Quote reminds me of Powers of Ten Link (new window). One of those few HS science videos that was actually good.
 
2012-03-06 01:20:40 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: NDT is heir to the title of "Nifty Guy" previously bestowed upon Carl Sagan.


I'm kind of partial to Brian Cox but Neil Degrasse Tyson's not bad either.

Speaking of which, tonight on the Science Channel is a new episode of Through the Wormhole (narrated by Morgan Freeman if you're unfamiliar with it) is on tonight. 10:00pm EST. I set the DVR for it already so I'm not 100% sure of the time and I'm too lazy to go look.
 
2012-03-06 01:34:51 PM  
Came in to tell subby they spelled "Carl Sagan" wrong, but what's the point. I've always seen Neil DeGrasse Tyson as a lesser replacement for Carl because most of the interesting things Tyson has said were a riff on something I've heard from Sagan. However, there is a need for one of the scientists to be personable and accessible enough to be able to teach high science to the masses.

Plus: There are worse places to draw material from than Carl Sagan.


/starstuff
 
2012-03-06 01:54:57 PM  

Maud Dib: \you knew it was coming


Came here to post this.

/satisfied, etc.
 
2012-03-06 01:56:12 PM  

SJKebab: NDT is awesome and all, but personally, I think that Brian Cox is the best populariser of science out there at the moment. Just listening to him wax lyrically in his northern accent about the universe just makes you know that things will only get better. His mountaintop stances are far more majestic, he's friggin hilarious on The Infinite Monkey Cage, and the show he did on quantum mechanics over christmas had me gobsmacked.

Yeah, I might have a bit of a man-crush on him. NTTAWWT


I knew I wasn't alone in liking his style. I dunno about a man-crush or anything though. I really dig "Wonders of the Universe" and find myself not minding watching repeats of the show, something remarkable in itself, as I'm always learning something new when I watch it again. Fortunately it shows up pretty often and usually in a block of shows.
 
2012-03-06 01:59:39 PM  
DjangoStonereaver:
I disagree: NDT is just as good as Carl Sagan at bringing science education
to the masses. He is just as good a writer, and his work as the host of NOVA
SCIENCE NOW stands up to COSMOS, though NSN doesn't have the sort of
timelessness that COSMOS does.

And, the man can TALK. Having had the priviledge of socializing with him on a
number of occasions, I can assure you that what you see on TV or in formal
presentations is pretty much the way the man can express himself at all times,
even with his family (whom I have also had the pleasure of meeting). With him
its no act: what you see is him all the time, and the amount of sheer science
knowledge he has at his instant command and his eloquence of off-the-cuff
speech is truly staggering.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson (Excuuuuuse me, Dr. Tyson) is so full of himself you wouldn't believe.

Yes, I have taken a course from him.

One of these days I am going to meet him again and remind him of a grade he gave me on a paper. The one that was "fantastical and unrealistic"

What do you know, the concept is now accepted in the scientific community.
 
2012-03-06 02:16:03 PM  

Gimli_Gloin: One of these days I am going to meet him again and remind him of a grade he gave me on a paper. The one that was "fantastical and unrealistic"

What do you know, the concept is now accepted in the scientific community.


Oh, please elucidate us, Great One.
 
2012-03-06 02:19:38 PM  

ProfessorOhki: Quote reminds me of Powers of Ten Link (new window). One of those few HS science videos that was actually good.


Word. It's great then and now.
 
2012-03-06 02:20:00 PM  

UnspokenVoice: SJKebab: NDT is awesome and all, but personally, I think that Brian Cox is the best populariser of science out there at the moment. Just listening to him wax lyrically in his northern accent about the universe just makes you know that things will only get better. His mountaintop stances are far more majestic, he's friggin hilarious on The Infinite Monkey Cage, and the show he did on quantum mechanics over christmas had me gobsmacked.

Yeah, I might have a bit of a man-crush on him. NTTAWWT

I knew I wasn't alone in liking his style. I dunno about a man-crush or anything though. I really dig "Wonders of the Universe" and find myself not minding watching repeats of the show, something remarkable in itself, as I'm always learning something new when I watch it again. Fortunately it shows up pretty often and usually in a block of shows.


If you haven't seen the lecture I linked to above, check it out when you've got an hour free. I"ve watched it a couple of times now and likewise found myself gaining new insights each time.

"Without Pauli's exclusion principle, we wouldn't have chemistry.... which is worse than it sounds"
 
2012-03-06 02:21:35 PM  

midigod: Gimli_Gloin: One of these days I am going to meet him again and remind him of a grade he gave me on a paper. The one that was "fantastical and unrealistic"

What do you know, the concept is now accepted in the scientific community.

Oh, please elucidate us, Great One.


Tyson said that homeopathic medicine would never work, but then Gimli_Gloin went on to make billions with Head On!
 
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