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(AOL)   Grammatical mistakes not to make on your résumé. Yes, their all here for you're interest   (jobs.aol.com) divider line 29
    More: Obvious, mixed feelings, Pavlovian, grammars, web developer, Thank God, grammatical errors  
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8371 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Mar 2012 at 1:00 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-03-05 03:23:32 PM  
2 votes:

tomcatadam: There are worse kinds of errors. Like not having the requested 10 years experience in a 2 year old technology.


That's when you know you don't want to work there, because the HR office and the program office don't talk.
2012-03-05 03:14:16 PM  
2 votes:
There are worse kinds of errors. Like not having the requested 10 years experience in a 2 year old technology.
2012-03-05 07:36:46 AM  
2 votes:
Awww c'mon. It makes it much easier to pick out the idiots without having to waste time interviewing them. You're just making more work for the rest of us.

I still find it shocking how many people claim to speak English yet still don't understand the various homophones. I can slightly forgive people for having difficulty with apostrophes, because they can be a bit tricky. But if you claim to know a language, you should probably actually know it.

/This thread should be interesting
//grammar nazi
2012-03-05 11:01:55 PM  
1 votes:
I once received a resume from someone who was

"Interested in working in a fast paste environment"

Spell checker will just totally let something like that slip right on through...
2012-03-05 09:36:23 PM  
1 votes:

Kar98: Enormous-Schwanstucker: FTMFA:

There: A location. ("The pile of cover letters is over there.")

My grammar detector went off on that one. Mixing a plural "letters" with a singular "is".

Grammar Nazis, please advise.

Pile is singular.


Danke Kar.

I re-read the sentence and realized the singular pile, one second too late.
2012-03-05 09:30:20 PM  
1 votes:

Enormous-Schwanstucker: FTMFA:

There: A location. ("The pile of cover letters is over there.")

My grammar detector went off on that one. Mixing a plural "letters" with a singular "is".

Grammar Nazis, please advise.


Pile is singular.
2012-03-05 08:44:56 PM  
1 votes:
I am definitely not always correct when it comes to grammar and sentence structuring, but the incorrect use of the "your/you're" and "to/too" irks me.

With that said, this:
www.theindiepedant.com
2012-03-05 08:08:57 PM  
1 votes:

Prickly Pete: "The misuse of your/you're, there/their/they're, and to/too/two occurs more times than I care to dwell on"

Pfft, like I'm going to take advice from someone who ends a sentence with a preposition.


Hey you ended a sentence with preposition.
2012-03-05 08:00:32 PM  
1 votes:
Conversely, I've never seen an advertised job offering in my particular field that wasn't brimming with grammar, lexical, and logical errors. I don't know why this is. It's truly every one.
2012-03-05 06:36:19 PM  
1 votes:

brigid_fitch: lincoln65: Everyone is forgetting the most important thing about rêsǚmeš:

People don't read them. Or, if they do, certainly not 100% of them. Sure, fix all your typos and show that you dont write words bad you are capable of producing a professional document. Beyond that, though, no one is going to give more than 30 seconds serious consideration to what your rәsumæ looks like.

Not true at all. I search for resumes by keywords then scan them to make sure the keywords fit what I'm looking for (example: Looking for someone with K-12 sales experience. If K-12 only denotes the grades they taught, I move on). But after that, you're damn right I read the resume. And if I find typos or poor grammar, it gets tossed.

Also, style does matter. If the resume is written as blocks of text instead of bullet points, I won't consider it. If you can't manage to sum up your job in 5-10 points (no more than 10 & that's really pushing it), and feel the need to drone one, I don't want to talk to talk to you. If they can't figure out how to organize their thoughts on paper, they won't be able to do it during an interview.


What's that internet law about spelling and grammar corrections always having an error in them?

/I keed I keed :-)
2012-03-05 06:17:09 PM  
1 votes:
And, obviously, when I'm typing something about shiat formatting FARK auto-removes the closing bold tag randomly just because the server is a dick that loves creating its own irony. You'd think that would've, y'know, shown up in preview. Oh, well.
2012-03-05 05:20:27 PM  
1 votes:
Everyone is forgetting the most important thing about rêsǚmeš:

People don't read them. Or, if they do, certainly not 100% of them. Sure, fix all your typos and show that you dont write words bad you are capable of producing a professional document. Beyond that, though, no one is going to give more than 30 seconds serious consideration to what your rәsumæ looks like.
2012-03-05 04:09:57 PM  
1 votes:

algrant33: ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.

As a degreed mechanical engineer who prides himself on his impeccable spelling and grammar, fark you in the ass so hard.

/I must admit, 99% of the time you're spot-on


I know I'm spot on. I went to school with other engineers :)

/Comp Eng
2012-03-05 03:04:56 PM  
1 votes:
I am a copywriter with nearly 25 years of professional experience, including several years in the marketing dept. of an extremely large corporation, plus I have a fairly nice sheepskin. So people like to hand me their resumes, looking for tips to "spruce up" their verbiage and "make it punchier" or some such nonsense.

They always seem shocked when I hand it back to them with all of their spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes corrected. They're expecting a few wordsmithing tips, and what they actually get back is Very Bad News... because they already sent 50 of these abortions out there.

/true fact... just as I typed the word "abortions" above, the Sex Pistols' "Bodies" shuffled up on iTunes.
//35 years later, this song still rocks my murtherfarking world
2012-03-05 02:46:59 PM  
1 votes:

ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.


As a degreed mechanical engineer who prides himself on his impeccable spelling and grammar, fark you in the ass so hard.

/I must admit, 99% of the time you're spot-on
2012-03-05 02:35:07 PM  
1 votes:

SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.


I've always been annoyed by the GPA thing. When I was in college, I took lots of electives on subjects that I didn't know a lot about. A few of them were were pretty hard, and I ended up with high B's or low A's. One time I got a C. So, I challenged myself to learn something knew, and, like most people, didn't get the hang of it right away. That would bring down my GPA.

I had friends, though, who took classes about stuff they already knew (one guy speaks Chinese fluently and took Chinese), and did well, thus helping their GPA's. I had an ex tell me that I should have "played the game," and my GPA would have been better.

It just kind of sucks that you basically get rewarded for not trying to learn new stuff.

/Ended up with a 3.41, I think.
2012-03-05 02:33:42 PM  
1 votes:

SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.


Too harsh.

I worked through college and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. I also did not date at all for the last two years I was in college. By the time I reached my second semester of my senior year, I was so exhausted and depressed, I sort of wanted to die. What I told a good friend at the time was "I'm not suicidal. I just wish I could slip into a coma for a few months so I could rest without feeling guilty."

If someone else has Mommy and Daddy pay their way through, I'm not going to pass judgment on them.

Unless you're screening people who will have a direct impact on public health or safety, I wouldn't toss anything over a 3.0 GPA because having a life is also important.
2012-03-05 02:32:24 PM  
1 votes:
Let's eat grandma.
2012-03-05 02:30:33 PM  
1 votes:
I'm relaxed about most things. Bad grammar, however, drives me insane. I understand that there are confusing parts to grammar, I really do, but seeing people screw up the most basic stuff boggles my mind. I feel the same way about bad spelling.
2012-03-05 02:28:52 PM  
1 votes:
Some folk equate grammatical errors with intelligence. I suppose that's true in some cases, but it seems to me that the more important issue is related to the ability to focus and to communicate. If the only chance you have for someone to express interest in you or your skills is through a piece of paper, that piece of paper shouldn't provide an excuse for someone to issue demerits.

/anyone have the "get a brain Morans" photo?
2012-03-05 02:28:16 PM  
1 votes:
what happens when there are grammatical/spelling mistakes in the job listings?

farking HR douchebags
2012-03-05 02:19:29 PM  
1 votes:
its spelt intrest fore u dat carez
2012-03-05 01:53:55 PM  
1 votes:
4. Proofread and then proofread again

Too bloody right, mate. For years I used the same cover letter template and rewrote the main body paragraphs to tailor it to the job I was applying for. I don't know how many I sent out that contained the final line "I can be reached be email at..."

Could explain why I didn't get as many callbacks as I'd hoped.
2012-03-05 01:40:16 PM  
1 votes:
"I can clearly see you're nuts."
Something you would say to the average farker in the politics tab.

"I can clearly see your nuts."
Something you would say to the average farker in a women's washroom.
2012-03-05 01:34:22 PM  
1 votes:

scottydoesntknow: Having any kind of spelling or grammatical mistakes should immediately disqualify you. If you can't take the time to make sure YOUR OWN resume is correct, what in the hell will convince me you won't do the same in the position I'm hiring for?


Of course, there's a problem with being grammatically accurate, too: So many people are so bad at grammar and punctuation that they mistake correct for incorrect. This is a significant risk with "office admin with nothing better to do screens resumes" organizations and the ever-present "HR people are almost universally dingbats, but you have to get through them first" scenario.

(And, of course, you ended your sentence in a preposition... even if we let that slide, your sentence structure is a trainwreck. But I don't really want to pick on you specifically -- just the issue of "I review resumes with a keen eye and cut people mercilessly... but my grasp of written English is also weak.")

So an applicant -also- has to build resumes and cover letters with an eye for, "yes, that's correct... but does it *look* wrong to some people?" problems. So, even if it is correct, ya' must avoid any instance of "[noun] and me," or "[name-that-ends-in-s]'s," etc etc ad, nearly, infinitum.

Sigh.

The real bottom line is, though: Almost every job is filled by the ol' "someone who knows someone, regardless of actual candidate merit" protocol. Which -really- sucks if you don't know anyone.

/ has also wanted to bury an inappropriate sentence
// or direct honesty ("My resume is completely honest; no other example you are reading today is.")
/// or direct demand ("Seriously, you know you just need someone to start tackling that mountain of shiat that never gets addressed: Hire me.")
2012-03-05 01:19:13 PM  
1 votes:
I'm going to bury a sentence if I ever have to send a resume (which is probably never again) just to see if they read it.

- Proficient with systems integration and I pooped a little when I coughed while establishing inter-office communication channels.
- Proven and verifiable sales achievements that don't matter when you're smarter than most employees while attaining monthly sales quotas
2012-03-05 12:11:08 PM  
1 votes:
Grammatical mistakes not to make to not make on your résumé.


/ftfy
2012-03-05 12:03:26 PM  
1 votes:
Not mentioned in TFA:

Use a normal email address, for Christ's sake. Your name is fine. DON'T put moronic stuff like "chula69" or "s3xboi", both of which I've seen. And the weirdest was someone just last week using a Juno email. WTF? AOL users are bad enough. I don't even know what it says about a person still using Juno.
2012-03-05 10:58:09 AM  
1 votes:

BurnShrike: Awww c'mon. It makes it much easier to pick out the idiots without having to waste time interviewing them. You're just making more work for the rest of us.


Yea this. Having any kind of spelling or grammatical mistakes should immediately disqualify you. If you can't take the time to make sure YOUR OWN resume is correct, what in the hell will convince me you won't do the same in the position I'm hiring for?
 
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