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(AOL)   Grammatical mistakes not to make on your résumé. Yes, their all here for you're interest   (jobs.aol.com) divider line 125
    More: Obvious, mixed feelings, Pavlovian, grammars, web developer, Thank God, grammatical errors  
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8369 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Mar 2012 at 1:00 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-05 02:46:59 PM

ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.


As a degreed mechanical engineer who prides himself on his impeccable spelling and grammar, fark you in the ass so hard.

/I must admit, 99% of the time you're spot-on
 
2012-03-05 02:49:23 PM
I've seen some doozies on applications. My personal favorite was the woman who punched her "baby daddy" at work because he was "flirtin with another woman" so "I gots fired for defended my man."
 
2012-03-05 02:51:02 PM

ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.


I have my wife check mine for mistakes(she used to work in an HR dept.) if she has to correct the mistakes, she usually sits in my lap while I dictate to her.
 
2012-03-05 02:52:02 PM

Cat With Two Heads: camtheman: It just kind of sucks that you basically get rewarded for not trying to learn new stuff.

/Ended up with a 3.41, I think.

I once took a graduate course, 800-level Women's Studies course as an undergrad, with only an intro course in the subject under my belt. I busted my ass, studied page after page of postmodern nonsense, asked every stupid remedial question while my classmates glared at the token white male, and barely got a D+. Killed my GPA, but learned far far more than I would have in another repetitious language class.


You're serious. Neither of the two colleges I attended had women's studies. I've always thought women's studies was as real as a Major in Underwater Basket Weaving.
 
2012-03-05 02:55:35 PM

Lunaville: You're serious. Neither of the two colleges I attended had women's studies. I've always thought women's studies was as real as a Major in Underwater Basket Weaving.


What odd capitalization choices. Drugs?
 
2012-03-05 02:57:05 PM

Cat With Two Heads: Lunaville: You're serious. Neither of the two colleges I attended had women's studies. I've always thought women's studies was as real as a Major in Underwater Basket Weaving.

What odd capitalization choices. Drugs?


If he is telling the truth, I'm guessing it was a very small, liberal arts college OR possible an all-male school like Wabash College.
 
2012-03-05 02:57:37 PM

algrant33: ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.

As a degreed mechanical engineer who prides himself on his impeccable spelling and grammar, fark you in the ass so hard.

/I must admit, 99% of the time you're spot-on


Sweety, it was a joke.
 
2012-03-05 02:58:48 PM

Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.

Too harsh.

I worked through college and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. I also did not date at all for the last two years I was in college. By the time I reached my second semester of my senior year, I was so exhausted and depressed, I sort of wanted to die. What I told a good friend at the time was "I'm not suicidal. I just wish I could slip into a coma for a few months so I could rest without feeling guilty."

If someone else has Mommy and Daddy pay their way through, I'm not going to pass judgment on them.

Unless you're screening people who will have a direct impact on public health or safety, I wouldn't toss anything over a 3.0 GPA because having a life is also important.


I actually work in biotech so people could potentially die. Also as far as the GPA is concerned, I only care about GPA in yoru major, not cumlative (no one cares about art history etc).

That being said, just don't put it on your resume. Its just another way to weed you out
 
2012-03-05 02:59:36 PM

SoCalSurfer: Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.

Too harsh.

I worked through college and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. I also did not date at all for the last two years I was in college. By the time I reached my second semester of my senior year, I was so exhausted and depressed, I sort of wanted to die. What I told a good friend at the time was "I'm not suicidal. I just wish I could slip into a coma for a few months so I could rest without feeling guilty."

If someone else has Mommy and Daddy pay their way through, I'm not going to pass judgment on them.

Unless you're screening people who will have a direct impact on public health or safety, I wouldn't toss anything over a 3.0 GPA because having a life is also important.

I actually work in biotech so people could potentially die. Also as far as the GPA is concerned, I only care about GPA in yoru major, not cumlative (no one cares about art history etc).

That being said, just don't put it on your resume. Its just another way to weed you out


Oh boy
 
2012-03-05 03:00:48 PM

Cat With Two Heads: Lunaville: You're serious. Neither of the two colleges I attended had women's studies. I've always thought women's studies was as real as a Major in Underwater Basket Weaving.

What odd capitalization choices. Drugs?


You're right, it was an odd way to emphasize that phrase. Maybe it was odd to emphasize it all.
 
2012-03-05 03:01:47 PM

Lunaville: Cat With Two Heads: Lunaville: You're serious. Neither of the two colleges I attended had women's studies. I've always thought women's studies was as real as a Major in Underwater Basket Weaving.

What odd capitalization choices. Drugs?

You're right, it was an odd way to emphasize that phrase. Maybe it was odd to emphasize it at all.


Maybe some drugs would help. Do you have any? Will you share?
 
2012-03-05 03:04:03 PM

Lunaville: Lunaville: Cat With Two Heads: Lunaville: You're serious. Neither of the two colleges I attended had women's studies. I've always thought women's studies was as real as a Major in Underwater Basket Weaving.

What odd capitalization choices. Drugs?

You're right, it was an odd way to emphasize that phrase. Maybe it was odd to emphasize it at all.

Maybe some drugs would help. Do you have any? Will you share?


Kids, don't buy drugs. Become a rockstar and they give you them for free
 
2012-03-05 03:04:43 PM

qorkfiend: The proper number of grammatical mistakes on a resume: ZERO.


THIS. I don't know of any grammatical mistakes that are allowed on a resume.
 
2012-03-05 03:04:56 PM
I am a copywriter with nearly 25 years of professional experience, including several years in the marketing dept. of an extremely large corporation, plus I have a fairly nice sheepskin. So people like to hand me their resumes, looking for tips to "spruce up" their verbiage and "make it punchier" or some such nonsense.

They always seem shocked when I hand it back to them with all of their spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes corrected. They're expecting a few wordsmithing tips, and what they actually get back is Very Bad News... because they already sent 50 of these abortions out there.

/true fact... just as I typed the word "abortions" above, the Sex Pistols' "Bodies" shuffled up on iTunes.
//35 years later, this song still rocks my murtherfarking world
 
2012-03-05 03:07:23 PM

redmid17: Cat With Two Heads: Lunaville: You're serious. Neither of the two colleges I attended had women's studies. I've always thought women's studies was as real as a Major in Underwater Basket Weaving.

What odd capitalization choices. Drugs?

If he is telling the truth, I'm guessing it was a very small, liberal arts college OR possible an all-male school like Wabash College.


She is telling the truth. Both schools were miniscule. The first one was a junior college and a military school. That school did have a military history class that sounded quite keen. I wasn't allowed to take it because I wasn't a cadet.

The second school was a very small, liberal arts college.

I wouldn't mind taking a women's studies class just to see what it's all about. Of course, I wouldn't mind taking a military history class either.
 
2012-03-05 03:08:17 PM

SoCalSurfer: Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.

Too harsh.

I worked through college and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. I also did not date at all for the last two years I was in college. By the time I reached my second semester of my senior year, I was so exhausted and depressed, I sort of wanted to die. What I told a good friend at the time was "I'm not suicidal. I just wish I could slip into a coma for a few months so I could rest without feeling guilty."

If someone else has Mommy and Daddy pay their way through, I'm not going to pass judgment on them.

Unless you're screening people who will have a direct impact on public health or safety, I wouldn't toss anything over a 3.0 GPA because having a life is also important.

I actually work in biotech so people could potentially die. Also as far as the GPA is concerned, I only care about GPA in yoru major, not cumlative (no one cares about art history etc).

That being said, just don't put it on your resume. Its just another way to weed you out


That makes sense.
 
2012-03-05 03:14:16 PM
There are worse kinds of errors. Like not having the requested 10 years experience in a 2 year old technology.
 
2012-03-05 03:23:32 PM

tomcatadam: There are worse kinds of errors. Like not having the requested 10 years experience in a 2 year old technology.


That's when you know you don't want to work there, because the HR office and the program office don't talk.
 
2012-03-05 03:27:09 PM

Mr_Fabulous: I am a copywriter with nearly 25 years of professional experience, including several years in the marketing dept. of an extremely large corporation, plus I have a fairly nice sheepskin. So people like to hand me their resumes, looking for tips to "spruce up" their verbiage and "make it punchier" or some such nonsense.

They always seem shocked when I hand it back to them with all of their spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes corrected. They're expecting a few wordsmithing tips, and what they actually get back is Very Bad News... because they already sent 50 of these abortions out there.

/true fact... just as I typed the word "abortions" above, the Sex Pistols' "Bodies" shuffled up on iTunes.
//35 years later, this song still rocks my murtherfarking world


This. I helped a fellow aspiring writer with her resume recently.

It was incomprehensible; her grammar and phrasing was a mess. I told her this. She subsequently ignored my advice and sent the resume with no changes. This is why she's worked a shiatty retail job for ten years and I work in publishing.

/You may think grammar is unimportant but a flowing sentence with proper grammar is easier to read than a mess of errors and misspelled words.
 
2012-03-05 03:38:32 PM

brigid_fitch: Not mentioned in TFA:

Use a normal email address, for Christ's sake. Your name is fine. DON'T put moronic stuff like "chula69" or "s3xboi", both of which I've seen. And the weirdest was someone just last week using a Juno email. WTF? AOL users are bad enough. I don't even know what it says about a person still using Juno.


So much this. I'd recommend to anyone: spend the couple of dollars a month and get your own personalized domain. Comes off very professional (and you can even still use gmail and the like, and have that domain point there.)
 
2012-03-05 04:09:57 PM

algrant33: ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.

As a degreed mechanical engineer who prides himself on his impeccable spelling and grammar, fark you in the ass so hard.

/I must admit, 99% of the time you're spot-on


I know I'm spot on. I went to school with other engineers :)

/Comp Eng
 
2012-03-05 04:12:16 PM

Lunaville: That school did have a military history class that sounded quite keen.


Yep, drugs.
 
2012-03-05 04:12:53 PM

Lunaville: brigid_fitch: Lunaville: brigid_fitch: Not mentioned in TFA:

Use a normal email address, for Christ's sake. Your name is fine. DON'T put moronic stuff like "chula69" or "s3xboi", both of which I've seen. And the weirdest was someone just last week using a Juno email. WTF? AOL users are bad enough. I don't even know what it says about a person still using Juno.

I'm sure an email address says a lot about a persons' innate ability to train, their work ethic, and how that individual would actually perform on the job.

Actually, yes it does. As Cat With Two Heads pointed out, you can show a minor amount of professionalism in registering a neutral email address. The AOL thing is an acknowledged prejudice among recruiters and there have been long discussions about it. It's more a matter of the TYPE of person who still uses AOL than anything else. In our experience, the vast majority of people who still use AOL email tend to have little or no computer skills and show a lack of initiative. They generally know how to type with Msft Word but that's about it. And anything more than basic internet searches elude them.

I've heard stories that employers used to willing to provide some basic training to employees. It's probably one of those urban myths.


It's 8.3% unemployment. Why should we invest time in someone who thinks Facebook is the internet as opposed to someone who actually knows the difference between a website and an ISP?

You seem awfully bitter in many of your posts throughout this thread. Y'know, that kind of negativity easily comes through during an interview. If you're having trouble getting a position, perhaps it's not your resume-writing skills that are causing the problem.
 
2012-03-05 04:15:21 PM
Obligatory for a Grammar Thread

i1126.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-05 04:21:02 PM

The English Major: I've seen some doozies on applications. My personal favorite was the woman who punched her "baby daddy" at work because he was "flirtin with another woman" so "I gots fired for defended my man."


Oh, good "Reasons for Leaving" stories would take a whole other thread! My Facebook friends get a kick because I post them whenever I have them. From last week:

Applicant: "A new manager came in and there was a personality conflict. We both felt it was best I moved on"
Me: "Well, sometimes that happens."
Applicant: "Yeah, especially when she's an obnoxious biatch."

/Not the best one
//Best one was a guy who ran a financial company in WA & left in early 2009. Told me it was because it went bankrupt after the recession hit, so he fled to the East Coast to hide from the banks.
 
2012-03-05 04:35:15 PM

brigid_fitch: Lunaville: brigid_fitch: Lunaville: brigid_fitch: Not mentioned in TFA:

Use a normal email address, for Christ's sake. Your name is fine. DON'T put moronic stuff like "chula69" or "s3xboi", both of which I've seen. And the weirdest was someone just last week using a Juno email. WTF? AOL users are bad enough. I don't even know what it says about a person still using Juno.

I'm sure an email address says a lot about a persons' innate ability to train, their work ethic, and how that individual would actually perform on the job.

Actually, yes it does. As Cat With Two Heads pointed out, you can show a minor amount of professionalism in registering a neutral email address. The AOL thing is an acknowledged prejudice among recruiters and there have been long discussions about it. It's more a matter of the TYPE of person who still uses AOL than anything else. In our experience, the vast majority of people who still use AOL email tend to have little or no computer skills and show a lack of initiative. They generally know how to type with Msft Word but that's about it. And anything more than basic internet searches elude them.

I've heard stories that employers used to willing to provide some basic training to employees. It's probably one of those urban myths.

It's 8.3% unemployment. Why should we invest time in someone who thinks Facebook is the internet as opposed to someone who actually knows the difference between a website and an ISP?

You seem awfully bitter in many of your posts throughout this thread. Y'know, that kind of negativity easily comes through during an interview. If you're having trouble getting a position, perhaps it's not your resume-writing skills that are causing the problem.


What about someone who won't go near Facebook? Would you take a chance on someone like that?
What if a person thinks Fark is the internet? Will that work?
 
2012-03-05 05:17:24 PM

ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.


right.....
 
2012-03-05 05:17:31 PM

BurnShrike: Some great resume fails here (new window)

"Skills: Strong Work Ethic, Attention to Detail, Team Player, Self Motivated, Attention to Detail"
"I am great with the pubic."
"Am a perfectionist and rarely if if ever forget details."
Reason for leaving: "I thought the world was coming to an end."

The last one answers the question to "What happened to all those people who quit their job because of Harold Camping's predicted apocalypse"


A candidate listed her e-mail address as pornstardelight@*****.com

WHEN CAN YOU START?!?
 
2012-03-05 05:20:27 PM
Everyone is forgetting the most important thing about rêsǚmeš:

People don't read them. Or, if they do, certainly not 100% of them. Sure, fix all your typos and show that you dont write words bad you are capable of producing a professional document. Beyond that, though, no one is going to give more than 30 seconds serious consideration to what your rәsumæ looks like.
 
2012-03-05 05:29:09 PM
I find reading resumes that are correct only because they are grammatically correct wearying to read. Unrewarding.
 
2012-03-05 05:29:32 PM

lincoln65: Everyone is forgetting the most important thing about rêsǚmeš:

People don't read them. Or, if they do, certainly not 100% of them. Sure, fix all your typos and show that you dont write words bad you are capable of producing a professional document. Beyond that, though, no one is going to give more than 30 seconds serious consideration to what your rәsumæ looks like.


Not true at all. I search for resumes by keywords then scan them to make sure the keywords fit what I'm looking for (example: Looking for someone with K-12 sales experience. If K-12 only denotes the grades they taught, I move on). But after that, you're damn right I read the resume. And if I find typos or poor grammar, it gets tossed.

Also, style does matter. If the resume is written as blocks of text instead of bullet points, I won't consider it. If you can't manage to sum up your job in 5-10 points (no more than 10 & that's really pushing it), and feel the need to drone one, I don't want to talk to talk to you. If they can't figure out how to organize their thoughts on paper, they won't be able to do it during an interview.
 
2012-03-05 05:39:48 PM
1. Know your homophones

they should just be gotten rid of and only one word used regardless of meaning.

new standards should be written for the modern times. if u now what I mean.
 
2012-03-05 05:46:14 PM
Eventually, interviewers will all be so incapable of forming a decent sentence that these kinds of mistakes won't matter.

Until then, by all means ... make my task easier.
 
2012-03-05 05:50:29 PM

LandStander: Grammatical mistakes not to make to not make on your résumé.

/ftfy


Split infinitive. Iffy.
 
2012-03-05 06:15:23 PM
I used to work in a position where I received electronic CVs and took them to HR in paper format.

Things that needed explanations at the interview stage, like gaps in employment and so on, were ticked off in pencil with a short note. Spelling and grammatical errors in the cover letter? Circled in thick red marker. Anything with three circles when into the similarly-shaped file.

So... yeah, the kinds of basic middle-school English stuff in the article is in fact something you should take quite seriously. Remember that you can't offset errors in your CV by being charming or overall competent in the way you can make up for interview slips.

lincoln65: Everyone is forgetting the most important thing about rêsǚmeš:

People don't read them.


Unless you're applying to a company that's like one dude in a basement, your CV will in fact be read in its entirety, just by several different people. The arrangement I mentioned above, where one person plays secretary and reads over the cover letter for blatant "too stupid to be worth knocking up the chain" indicators, another does a quick read-over to verify that the basic requirements of the position are satisfied, and a third (who may or may not be the interviewer) actually goes over the prior employment entries and calls references etc. is fairly common. In my case I was the first two guys, and the other end of the reference call when the third guy called from other places about one of our old employees.
 
2012-03-05 06:17:09 PM
And, obviously, when I'm typing something about shiat formatting FARK auto-removes the closing bold tag randomly just because the server is a dick that loves creating its own irony. You'd think that would've, y'know, shown up in preview. Oh, well.
 
2012-03-05 06:36:19 PM

brigid_fitch: lincoln65: Everyone is forgetting the most important thing about rêsǚmeš:

People don't read them. Or, if they do, certainly not 100% of them. Sure, fix all your typos and show that you dont write words bad you are capable of producing a professional document. Beyond that, though, no one is going to give more than 30 seconds serious consideration to what your rәsumæ looks like.

Not true at all. I search for resumes by keywords then scan them to make sure the keywords fit what I'm looking for (example: Looking for someone with K-12 sales experience. If K-12 only denotes the grades they taught, I move on). But after that, you're damn right I read the resume. And if I find typos or poor grammar, it gets tossed.

Also, style does matter. If the resume is written as blocks of text instead of bullet points, I won't consider it. If you can't manage to sum up your job in 5-10 points (no more than 10 & that's really pushing it), and feel the need to drone one, I don't want to talk to talk to you. If they can't figure out how to organize their thoughts on paper, they won't be able to do it during an interview.


What's that internet law about spelling and grammar corrections always having an error in them?

/I keed I keed :-)
 
2012-03-05 06:53:40 PM
squirrelnator
What's that internet law about spelling and grammar corrections always having an error in them?

I've run afoul of that law quite often. Stupid poetic justice.
 
2012-03-05 07:44:17 PM

HighZoolander: ProfessorOhki: If you receive a resume for an engineering position that has flawless grammar and spelling, throw it out; they clearly had someone else right it for them.

right.....


Oh c'mon, look threw this thread. Their all doing it to!
 
2012-03-05 07:51:16 PM

Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.

Too harsh.

I worked through college and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. I also did not date at all for the last two years I was in college. By the time I reached my second semester of my senior year, I was so exhausted and depressed, I sort of wanted to die. What I told a good friend at the time was "I'm not suicidal. I just wish I could slip into a coma for a few months so I could rest without feeling guilty."

If someone else has Mommy and Daddy pay their way through, I'm not going to pass judgment on them.

Unless you're screening people who will have a direct impact on public health or safety, I wouldn't toss anything over a 3.0 GPA because having a life is also important.

I actually work in biotech so people could potentially die. Also as far as the GPA is concerned, I only care about GPA in yoru major, not cumlative (no one cares about art history etc).

That being said, just don't put it on your resume. Its just another way to weed you out

That makes sense.


I'm always amazed the the average at Harvard is an "A" and everyone there graduates with honors. Who know that the children of alumni would be so farking smart!

If you ever interview someone that did one of those semesters at sea program, grill them on what they learned.
 
2012-03-05 07:52:20 PM

HempHead: Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.

Too harsh.

I worked through college and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. I also did not date at all for the last two years I was in college. By the time I reached my second semester of my senior year, I was so exhausted and depressed, I sort of wanted to die. What I told a good friend at the time was "I'm not suicidal. I just wish I could slip into a coma for a few months so I could rest without feeling guilty."

If someone else has Mommy and Daddy pay their way through, I'm not going to pass judgment on them.

Unless you're screening people who will have a direct impact on public health or safety, I wouldn't toss anything over a 3.0 GPA because having a life is also important.

I actually work in biotech so people could potentially die. Also as far as the GPA is concerned, I only care about GPA in yoru major, not cumlative (no one cares about art history etc).

That being said, just don't put it on your resume. Its just another way to weed you out

That makes sense.

I'm always amazed the the average at Harvard is an "A" and everyone there graduates with honors. Who know that the children of alumni would be so farking smart!

If you ever interview someone that did one of those semesters at sea program, grill them on what they learned.


Don't drink the water in Mexico or Central America?
 
2012-03-05 08:00:32 PM
Conversely, I've never seen an advertised job offering in my particular field that wasn't brimming with grammar, lexical, and logical errors. I don't know why this is. It's truly every one.
 
2012-03-05 08:04:50 PM
"The misuse of your/you're, there/their/they're, and to/too/two occurs more times than I care to dwell on"

Pfft, like I'm going to take advice from someone who ends a sentence with a preposition.
 
2012-03-05 08:08:57 PM

Prickly Pete: "The misuse of your/you're, there/their/they're, and to/too/two occurs more times than I care to dwell on"

Pfft, like I'm going to take advice from someone who ends a sentence with a preposition.


Hey you ended a sentence with preposition.
 
2012-03-05 08:25:25 PM
How about stylistic mistakes to avoid subby?
 
2012-03-05 08:41:05 PM
Was someone actually paid to write this article? I think I link to a wikipedia article would be more useful.
 
2012-03-05 08:42:55 PM
Here in Japan I once saw a businessman on a train going through a stack of resumes, apparently for a secretary position. Each one had a snapshot of the woman/girl stapled to it. Makes the hiring process easier for the businessman, I suppose.
 
2012-03-05 08:44:56 PM
I am definitely not always correct when it comes to grammar and sentence structuring, but the incorrect use of the "your/you're" and "to/too" irks me.

With that said, this:
www.theindiepedant.com
 
2012-03-05 09:01:32 PM

HempHead: Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Lunaville: SoCalSurfer: Was reading resumes for post college entry level position last week.

Mistake #1: putting your GPA on your resume. Everything below a 3.4 I threw out.

Mistake #2: no job history during college. If you didn't work at least a summer job, the least you can do is lie to make it seem like you care.

Too harsh.

I worked through college and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. I also did not date at all for the last two years I was in college. By the time I reached my second semester of my senior year, I was so exhausted and depressed, I sort of wanted to die. What I told a good friend at the time was "I'm not suicidal. I just wish I could slip into a coma for a few months so I could rest without feeling guilty."

If someone else has Mommy and Daddy pay their way through, I'm not going to pass judgment on them.

Unless you're screening people who will have a direct impact on public health or safety, I wouldn't toss anything over a 3.0 GPA because having a life is also important.

I actually work in biotech so people could potentially die. Also as far as the GPA is concerned, I only care about GPA in yoru major, not cumlative (no one cares about art history etc).

That being said, just don't put it on your resume. Its just another way to weed you out

That makes sense.

I'm always amazed the the average at Harvard is an "A" and everyone there graduates with honors. Who know that the children of alumni would be so farking smart!

If you ever interview someone that did one of those semesters at sea program, grill them on what they learned.


The first thing I thought was "They have a semesters at sea program?" I believe you, though, because tonight I visited the course listings for the little liberal arts college I graduated from long ago ... the one that didn't have women's studies. I found a class called Women's and Gender Studies.
 
2012-03-05 09:04:45 PM
Tomorrow, if I'm sufficiently bored, I think I'll call the military school and ask if they offer a Women's Studies class.
 
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