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(UPI)   Want to buy a brand new computer? Got $35?   (upi.com) divider line 115
    More: Followup, Britain, Department for Education  
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11442 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Mar 2012 at 7:46 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-04 11:14:57 PM

Surool: I have $35, but don't want a computer... wat do?


But do you also have a six pack?

/Rollins
//well, Black Flag, if you want to be pedantic about it.
 
2012-03-04 11:19:54 PM

fusillade762: Nihilist's Guide to Reticent Entropy: You mean I can't play WoW on it?!?!?

You misspelled "Skyrim".


I keep hearing people mention this wow thing when I talk about skyrim, was that something that was big before I got into computers in the 90's?

/;)
 
2012-03-04 11:22:01 PM

cgalant: HeartBurnKid: Wrong. It is, indeed, a full on computer -- just not a Wintel one. Get an SD card, stick Debian on there, and you most definitely can run a full desktop off of this baby.

I'm talking about for the average Joe. If you picked one of my coworkers at random and told them they could get a computer for 35 bucks - they would assume more than this is offering. I'm not saying it's a bad deal - this is a pretty badass little package - but it's really not for everyone.


No, it's not, but calling it merely a "development board" is doing it a disservice. Raspberry Pi is a full-blown general purpose computing device, and it is far more powerful and more capable than most of the computers I have owned in my lifetime.
 
2012-03-04 11:30:15 PM

saintwrathchild: Serious question: what sort of project can be done with one of these (specific examples welcome)? I've developed an interest in programming in the last year, but don't even know where to start. I learn best by "doing" and projects, so even pointing a finger toward the just the most basic thing/project, as long as there's some sort of obviously demonstrable outcome, would be helpful. Thanks ahead of time.

/not Indian


Depends on what you like to do. I want one because it comes with a nice 1080 capable video chip, and having that much power available for some of my installed art pieces used to take a whole computer driving a projector. Now, I could park a creditcard sized board next to the projector, and be done. But I'm comfortable programming at that level.

For beginning programmers, it's nice because it's functionally unbrickable. Opps, your new program destroyed the OS? Download another copy on to the memory card, and start over. In a school setting, where the teacher could just have a zip file with the default OS ready to replace on any one that gets screwed up, that's less to worry about.

Maybe you don't want to use the graphics capabilities, and just want a small linux CPU for a robot? Might be better served by a microcontroller, but if you want a whole OS stack then the Pi has that. Maybe you need USB host capabilities for some purpose.

Want to code an OS, but want to deal with real hardware and not an emulator like boch and Qemu, but also want something that has usb host capabilities?

Take your pick, there are a lot of things it does that aren't done by other items at that price point. Sure, any of those could be done by a whole expensive x86-64 computer, and some of them could be done cheaper with a micro and a good devkit. But you'll learn to code better when you stop thinking that big endian x86 is the only thing in existence, and learn to code more generically.

Now, if you personally just want to learn to program, and have access to a PC, this isn't the best way to go. That's a different topic, but I'd be willing to share some links if you need them.
 
2012-03-04 11:34:44 PM

Marine1: I don't want to be "that guy", but when I found they had moved production plans from the UK to China, I didn't want one anymore. Let's start building these things in some countries with real labor laws. Even if it is doubled in price, it's still only $70, which is cheap.


The problem is, $70 isn't cheap enough to put these in schools where they are needed, which is the entire point.

Not that it matters, since they finally were able to move manufacturing back to the UK.
 
2012-03-04 11:43:40 PM
Call me when render nodes are this cheap, scalable and can rip though a gnarly caustic laden maxwell render...
 
2012-03-04 11:46:02 PM

ykarie: Now, if you personally just want to learn to program, and have access to a PC, this isn't the best way to go. That's a different topic, but I'd be willing to share some links if you need them.


Do tell, please.
 
2012-03-04 11:51:37 PM
I'm an embedded systems programmer so I'm getting a kick out of...

Throwing a half-assed Linux kernel port at a new developer is not a good way to motivate them to learn programming. An Arduino with a couple of servos and motor for the win.
 
2012-03-04 11:56:09 PM

HeartBurnKid: Marine1: I don't want to be "that guy", but when I found they had moved production plans from the UK to China, I didn't want one anymore. Let's start building these things in some countries with real labor laws. Even if it is doubled in price, it's still only $70, which is cheap.

The problem is, $70 isn't cheap enough to put these in schools where they are needed, which is the entire point.

Not that it matters, since they finally were able to move manufacturing back to the UK.


Ah, didn't see that... good!
 
2012-03-04 11:58:08 PM

pinchpoint: You're all missing the most important thing: can I watch pr0n on it? If the answer is no then it's worthless.


it can do 1080p video out via HDMI or you can hook it up to pretty much any SDTV using the composite video out and there is already a build of XBMC for it as well as a port of openelec. So yes, you can easily watch porn on a TV or monitor attached to it.
 
2012-03-05 12:09:13 AM

saintwrathchild: ykarie: Now, if you personally just want to learn to program, and have access to a PC, this isn't the best way to go. That's a different topic, but I'd be willing to share some links if you need them.

Do tell, please.


You can either start with the basics, like learning about OOP or functional programming, and then applying that to a language and goal of your choice; or you can pick a goal that you want to do, then pick some languages and tools to learn to get there.

I started with C and C++, learning to write programs that took files from the command line, parsed them for instructions, and then did that. Professors cooked up fake census or geology problems, and we wrote programs to solve. Teaches you basics like how to parse files, then you can move to how to write objects in C++, how to use libraries to access graphics, etc.

From the other side, you can pick a language and just start a tutorial online. Ruby Monk (ruby), Code Year (javascript) are guided tutorials to learn those languages. Processing has some good tutorials and books, and gets you graphics, audio, and data programming in one simple language.

If you are a math person (think in functions, and like proofs) Erlang or Haskell. If you want to jump straight to programming something interactive and visual, Flash Action Script or Processing. Microcontrollers, look at Arduino or PIC Basic or learn C.

And . . . that's more links than I like to post to fark. Email is in profile, if you have a clue how you learn best, and can pick something, send me a message and I'll find the bookmarks I have that fit.
 
2012-03-05 12:15:54 AM
What's the feasibility of using one of these as a router? I like running some of the router distro's out there, don't like dedicating a stand alone machine to it though.
 
2012-03-05 12:18:59 AM

RaceBoatDriver: I'm an embedded systems programmer so I'm getting a kick out of...

Throwing a half-assed Linux kernel port at a new developer is not a good way to motivate them to learn programming. An Arduino with a couple of servos and motor for the win.


Throwing a high school intro programming course into embedded systems isn't a great idea either, if the teacher doesn't know anything other than what's in a school issued textbook. And each student learning on an Arduino needs a developing station to work at, instead of just a keyboard, a tv, and a ported binary of gcc.

It's a cheap computer meant to bring back the Acorn boom of the 80s. Something that didn't really happen in the USA, so there's some reason for the choices they made. While blinking a few lights in a pattern may have worked in the 80s, having an OpenGL graphics library will encourage more kids less interested in 'just programming invisible chips inside things' and more interested in 'making something big and shiny.' Both have jobs in the industry, and if an introductory class can educate all of them with a single piece of hardware (like the Acorn did back when) then it's a big win.

/tried video out on an arduino
//won't try it again
 
2012-03-05 12:43:49 AM

wagnerism: My wife is eyeing these for automation of her way too complicated aquarium setups... feeding, lights, CO2, etc.


Look into NeptuneSystems Apex or GHL Profilux. These are actual aquarium controllers and will do everything she would ever want and 10 times more.
 
2012-03-05 12:46:27 AM

Nihilist's Guide to Reticent Entropy: You mean I can't play WoW on it?!?!?

AWWW DURN IT ALL.


Satanic_Hamster: Pretty sure that a 35 buck computer won't run Counter Strike: GO worth a shiat, so fark that.


It can, however, run quake 3: Link (new window)
 
2012-03-05 12:54:09 AM

ykarie: saintwrathchild: ykarie: Now, if you personally just want to learn to program, and have access to a PC, this isn't the best way to go. That's a different topic, but I'd be willing to share some links if you need them.

Do tell, please.

You can either start with the basics, like learning about OOP or functional programming, and then applying that to a language and goal of your choice; or you can pick a goal that you want to do, then pick some languages and tools to learn to get there.

I started with C and C++, learning to write programs that took files from the command line, parsed them for instructions, and then did that. Professors cooked up fake census or geology problems, and we wrote programs to solve. Teaches you basics like how to parse files, then you can move to how to write objects in C++, how to use libraries to access graphics, etc.

From the other side, you can pick a language and just start a tutorial online. Ruby Monk (ruby), Code Year (javascript) are guided tutorials to learn those languages. Processing has some good tutorials and books, and gets you graphics, audio, and data programming in one simple language.

If you are a math person (think in functions, and like proofs) Erlang or Haskell. If you want to jump straight to programming something interactive and visual, Flash Action Script or Processing. Microcontrollers, look at Arduino or PIC Basic or learn C.

And . . . that's more links than I like to post to fark. Email is in profile, if you have a clue how you learn best, and can pick something, send me a message and I'll find the bookmarks I have that fit.


Good comment. Also: whatever language you choose, I would recommend "Head First" (new window) series of books from O'Reilly.

They're easy to read and walk you through in a very basic, hands-on method.
 
2012-03-05 01:10:54 AM

mjones73: What's the feasibility of using one of these as a router? I like running some of the router distro's out there, don't like dedicating a stand alone machine to it though.


I doubt it. The B model has one ethernet jack. You could use the USB port for a wireless device or another ethernet port, but then you are limited in bandwidth by the USB devices. Lots of those embedded ethernet chips just aren't in the same league as a real router ASIC. But, if you really want something as a boarder device and want to tinker, you could probably find a USB ethernet port with multiple ports. Just beware of how it handles packets on each adapter. If it works like a switch, your router will see different data than if it works like a hub.
 
2012-03-05 01:14:43 AM

ykarie: And . . . that's more links than I like to post to fark.


ScreamingHangover: Also: whatever language you choose, I would recommend "Head First" (new window) series of books from O'Reilly.


Thanks a whole bunch! I'm not really looking in a specific direction yet--if I had to say, probably website dev, but that's more out of a really tiny shred of practicality at work than any actual interests right now (had a programmer friend recommend Ruby over Java, but I'm also interested in HTML5 and PHP [was interested in Flash, but not since Adobe rang its death knell for mobile]).

Anyway, yeah, seriously helpful. Thanks again.
 
2012-03-05 01:16:48 AM
Neat. Seems like it would make a nice pfSense platform.

ykarie: Do tell, please.

You can either start with the basics, like learning about OOP or functional programming, and then applying that to a language and goal of your choice; or you can pick a goal that you want to do, then pick some languages and tools to learn to get there.

I started with C and C++, learning to write programs that took files from the command line, parsed them for instructions, and then did that. Professors cooked up fake census or geology problems, and we wrote programs to solve. Teaches you basics like how to parse files, then you can move to how to write objects in C++, how to use libraries to access graphics, etc.


I'm going backwards. I was thrown into programming in 1999 with VB6, then moved on to VB.Net and switched over to C#. Now I'm working my way through this book in order to understand some of the more fundamental principles of programming. I'm running Linux Mint, with the book open in Amazon cloud reader next to a gedit window, and working through the samples. It's been enlightening.
 
2012-03-05 01:21:55 AM
OK, Farkers, let me know if I haven't thought my cunning plan all the way through, but

Seems that this would be a good computer to use for a home network RADIUS server for your Wi-Fi. I don't know that I *need* to use WPA-Enterprise, but it would be fun to mess around with it. FreeRADIUS is only a few megs, and assuming that I have only a couple people authenticating per day, it should work pretty well. Any obvious problems that will prevent this from working before I waste $35?
 
2012-03-05 01:29:41 AM
Pre ordered mine from the Canadian supplier woooo. Gonna mount it in an empy clam cake box.
 
2012-03-05 02:29:42 AM
For the cost and bang for the buck, I much prefer the computer designed for third world countries. A $10 that has full keyboard and plugs into the TV and new software being written. Meet the Playpower project. A far more efficient system.

http://playpower.org/
 
2012-03-05 04:32:46 AM

Nightmaretony: For the cost and bang for the buck, I much prefer the computer designed for third world countries. A $10 that has full keyboard and plugs into the TV and new software being written. Meet the Playpower project. A far more efficient system.

http://playpower.org/


So where do you or anybody else buy one?
 
2012-03-05 06:04:30 AM
Oh, the skies will be so interesting.

homepage.mac.com

Cheap, farking, drones!
 
2012-03-05 06:59:28 AM

cgalant: The Rasberry Pi is a development board PC, not a full on "computer".


Actually if you get the full version with the ethernet adapter I'd call it a computer. Yes sure, it won't run Windows but there are already ARM ports of Linux (as you already said) floating around including Ubuntu. It's GPU is pretty potent for the price your paying as well and quite capable of video decoding and/or driving a 1080p display.

Sure it won't play Crysis it may even struggle with Tuxracer but with that SD Card snuggled inside it and the Pi sat in a little enclosure from Maplins or the like... yeah it's a computer and you can Fark on it to your hearts content.

It's also a development board but there is no real reason it can't be both that and a full on computer. I do agree that they'll see the same level of returns Asus did over the EEE 701 though; people brought it expecting a £200 laptop with all the trimmings, not a tinkerers toy.
 
2012-03-05 07:20:38 AM

andrewagill:
Seems that this would be a good computer to use for a home network RADIUS server for your Wi-Fi. I don't know that I *need* to use WPA-Enterprise, but it would be fun to mess around with it. FreeRADIUS is only a few megs, and assuming that I have only a couple people authenticating per day, it should work pretty well. Any obvious problems that will prevent this from working before I waste $35?


Assuming you get the B version with the Ethernet jack yeah it'll spend all of it's day idle doing the occasional auth request that gets thrown at it. Despite the 700Mhz ARM processor sounding like it'd struggle it's actually quite pokey.
 
2012-03-05 07:31:09 AM

Vaneshi: andrewagill:
Seems that this would be a good computer to use for a home network RADIUS server for your Wi-Fi. I don't know that I *need* to use WPA-Enterprise, but it would be fun to mess around with it. FreeRADIUS is only a few megs, and assuming that I have only a couple people authenticating per day, it should work pretty well. Any obvious problems that will prevent this from working before I waste $35?

Assuming you get the B version with the Ethernet jack yeah it'll spend all of it's day idle doing the occasional auth request that gets thrown at it. Despite the 700Mhz ARM processor sounding like it'd struggle it's actually quite pokey.


Yeah, I figured the processor would handle it, but I wasn't sure if maybe the SD card wouldn't like it or if the version of Linux that comes with it lacks critical features required for FreeRADIUS or even if the chip lacks certain features like an MMU, and requires something like μClinux to run.

Looking at the specs, I would expect it to run just fine, but I couldn't find any hardware or software requirements for FreeRADIUS (and I'm not joining their mailing list to ask them when you guys and gals are right here).
 
2012-03-05 08:03:59 AM

andrewagill: Looking at the specs, I would expect it to run just fine, but I couldn't find any hardware or software requirements for FreeRADIUS (and I'm not joining their mailing list to ask them when you guys and gals are right here).


Fark being useful? Today is a glorious day that should be remembered until the time Drew shuts the servers down. :D

Whilst the Linux kernel may well do some interesting legwork with an SD Card, as far as anything else running on the system is concerned it's a block device appearing as /dev/sdaX (x being the partition numbers) and there is no difference between it and a PATA/SATA connected HDD/SDD as far as the software is concerned. Which is a really nice thing I like about Linux... it doesn't try to get clever.

I'd poke around the Debian site looking at their ARM version, they tend to be pretty anal about making sure that package X is available on all possible formats (I checked and it looks like FreeRadius is available but hey, I'm not fully caffinated yet) so yeah I'd give your plan a thumbs up and wish you luck and fun :)
 
2012-03-05 08:28:12 AM

The launch of the Pi comes as the Department for Education is considering changes to the teaching of computing in schools with the goal of greater emphasis on skills like programming.
"Initiatives like the Raspberry Pi scheme will give children the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of programming," Secretary of State for Education Michael Gove said.


Hrmmm this just sounds like a bad idea. When they say "children" I wonder how young they are talking. I'd only support this idea if it was geared to the kids that excel in math. The others are going to fail if they lack logic and reasoning skills.

Hell I'm in a bullshiat Programming in C# class right now in college and the class average is 78%. I wonder what the low grade is, I have the high grade with 100% but I don't understand how people are losing so many points when the instructor gives the students step by step video tutorials of chapter exercises that mirror our weekly assignment.

//Already self taught myself pretty much everything that falls under my bachelors degree in Computer Science but I still have to waste this time completing programming classes. Ugh :(

archichris:
They do have the potential to inspire students to become developers though, so they may be more useful than you think.

my 6 year old is obsessed with mine craft and skyrim, I was hoping to channel some of the time he spends in front of the computer into early computer skills.

Got any suggestions on books, programs or websites?

What sort of development are you interested in providing for him? There are quite a few out there, although it sounds like he is more interested in the visual side of building a game rather than programming code. For this I would suggest Unity. It has a lot of power in terms of pushing out 3d games and they have put the emphasis on creating content rather than writing code (although you will need to write some of the code). They do have some objects and stuff within the application although if you go this route, download a bunch of 3d mesh files for him to work with. Maybe even let him take a stab at 3d modeling with Blender (an open source 3d modeling program) although the UI takes some time to get used to and I don't know if he will be able to grasp trying to make the objects.
 
2012-03-05 08:42:05 AM

haineux: All you salivating nerds who don't know how to program: You do NOT want this.



Fair enough. It's supposed to be an educational tool.


The Raspberry Pi is not interesting until it becomes trivially easy to put an entire bootable OS on it. And that OS is probably going to be Linux. If we're very lucky, Ubuntu.


Perhaps you should go to raspberrypi's web site. There's already two Linux distros for it, Debian Squeeze and a Fedora remix. And it *is* trivially easy to put them load them... just copy the OS image to an SD card.


Probably in a year, the software department of the OLPC foundation will port their OS onto it, which will make it a fine kid-computer, once you add a monitor (you'll need a modern one that takes an HDMI cable, or a $35+ adapter), a keyboard, a mouse, an ethernet cable, and a whole lot of patience.


It's not supposed to be a "fine kid computer". It's an edu tool to get kids interested in ComSci.
 
2012-03-05 09:18:33 AM
Give me 64 or 128 digital IO ports from this thing, and I can see a bunch of uses for it.
 
2012-03-05 09:36:04 AM

t3knomanser: Raspberry Pi fit-for-purpose for that application, you think?


I would try openpogo. Although the display would be nice, I imagine you'd configure it via a web app served from its internal Apache server anyway, so may as well get something a little more mature and that already deals with distributed filesystems of a sort.
 
2012-03-05 09:47:29 AM

Tenatra:
//Already self taught myself pretty much everything that falls under my bachelors degree in Computer Science but I still have to waste this time completing programming classes. Ugh :(


In some respects I saw the same in my programming classes in the 90's. Plenty of people knew QBasic or similar things and just could not transition to C.
 
2012-03-05 10:02:30 AM
Robots! There are a few other companies that make similar boards but they cost a little more.
 
2012-03-05 10:03:04 AM

OgreMagi: They have lined up a distributor to handle the North America side of the businesses. Hopefully they won't mark it up too much.


I preordered for $35, but the wouldn't say how much shipping will be.
 
2012-03-05 10:18:06 AM

t3knomanser: cgalant: The Rasberry Pi is a development board PC, not a full on "computer".

One of my product ideas that I'm never ambitious enough to prototype is a self-configuring server-in-a-box- you turn it on and show it your wireless network, and it becomes a node in a large distributed online file-sharing/social-networking platform. Basically your own personal cloud server- each node encrypts private files then distributes them across all the other nodes. The more users, the more total file storage. Assuming the distributed file system were smart enough, and the routing system were equally smart, you could get low latency file-access from anywhere in the world.

Raspberry Pi fit-for-purpose for that application, you think?

Not that I'm running out to start working on this- even with the state-of-the-art in distributed file systems, there'd be a lot of groundwork that needs done before that could work. I'm not really qualified to design file systems, let alone distributed ones. I write invoice processing and legal document generating apps for a living.


That is a great idea! You should develop it, or get with someone else who can.
 
2012-03-05 10:22:26 AM

Hack Patooey: Give me 64 or 128 digital IO ports from this thing, and I can see a bunch of uses for it.


http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs It has GPIO port. Not sure how many IO's it can handle, but you can build your own add ons to the device.
 
2012-03-05 10:26:45 AM
I'm interested in seeing how mine does as a low-power Web server. I've got a Mini-ITX board now that gets the job done, but it's using around 20 watts and has fans. The Pi has the same amount of RAM (256 MB) and a slightly slower processor, and I'll add a USB 2.5" hard drive and see if I can shift Web, Email and Database tasks to it.

If it can handle my PHP pages fine I'll probably stick with that. Other than that, bandwidth-wise the most it would ever get taxed would be posting a couple pictures on a Fark Caturday thread.
 
2012-03-05 10:53:02 AM

Tenatra: Hrmmm this just sounds like a bad idea. When they say "children" I wonder how young they are talking. I'd only support this idea if it was geared to the kids that excel in math. The others are going to fail if they lack logic and reasoning skills.

Hell I'm in a bullshiat Programming in C# class right now in college and the class average is 78%. I wonder what the low grade is, I have the high grade with 100% but I don't understand how people are losing so many points when the instructor gives the students step by step video tutorials of chapter exercises that mirror our weekly assignment.

//Already self taught myself pretty much everything that falls under my bachelors degree in Computer Science but I still have to waste this time completing programming classes. Ugh :(


Why do CS students always have such massive chips on their shoulders? We get it...you are way smarter than your professors and classmates.
 
2012-03-05 11:03:45 AM
what blows me away are some of the awesome case mods people are already coming up with for this thing.
 
2012-03-05 11:39:00 AM

coolcashiat77: Hack Patooey: Give me 64 or 128 digital IO ports from this thing, and I can see a bunch of uses for it.

http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs It has GPIO port. Not sure how many IO's it can handle, but you can build your own add ons to the device.


Yea, I noticed that. I'm digging into port expanders for it. I have a hardware application that I've been swearing at for a few months, and I'm trying to keep the cost down on it. Basically its a couple dozen nodes, each node needs to have maybe 24 or so I/O ports. The nodes are at a distance of up to a couple hundred feet. Right now Ive been looking at one central computer with a huge amount of cabling from the central location to the nodes. If I can sluff off a bunch of the processing to smart nodes, then I can cut down on the cabling. Ive looked at using Stamps and NANOs, but they're not smart enough to be a remote node like this.

Ah, hardware problems.
 
2012-03-05 11:57:39 AM

Hollie Maea: Tenatra: Hrmmm this just sounds like a bad idea. When they say "children" I wonder how young they are talking. I'd only support this idea if it was geared to the kids that excel in math. The others are going to fail if they lack logic and reasoning skills.

Hell I'm in a bullshiat Programming in C# class right now in college and the class average is 78%. I wonder what the low grade is, I have the high grade with 100% but I don't understand how people are losing so many points when the instructor gives the students step by step video tutorials of chapter exercises that mirror our weekly assignment.

//Already self taught myself pretty much everything that falls under my bachelors degree in Computer Science but I still have to waste this time completing programming classes. Ugh :(

Why do CS students always have such massive chips on their shoulders? We get it...you are way smarter than your professors and classmates.


There's give and take here. While some classes need to be dumbed down to the lowest common denomonator, even the experienced students need to learn 'good' and sound programming practice, and generally accepted philosophies. This often causes friction between those learning a little skim of cream and those learning whole milk.
 
2012-03-05 12:02:03 PM
I'm going to use it as a TS2 server and possibly an Arma Server..

Then I can get rid of a giant box and crt.
 
2012-03-05 12:32:14 PM
Hollie Maea:
Why do CS students always have such massive chips on their shoulders? We get it...you are way smarter than your professors and classmates.

It's not that I'm smarter, I'm just too advanced for the courses to get a degree in CS but I don't have enough experience to get a job in the field without it. I have around 8 years total but only 3 on the job (thank you Air Force). Entry level jobs are usually around 6-10 years on the job experience with no degree. ~4 with an associates, 1-2 with a bachelors, and 0 experience with a masters.

Also, let me put his courses in perspective. Quizzes are open book (unlimited time), Assignments are available for a week and you can use the video tutorials to walk you through every farking step (if you need them). The final is open book. There is no reason to have a bad grade in the course.

As for my instructor, yes I'm smarter than him in this field because he got his degree in the 80's and doesn't keep up with security practices and such. He runs the school network but I've noticed some discrepancies with just having a normal student account. I could have fun with shutdown -i and reboot the whole school network. There is read/write access on the schools web server, files are apparently not stored within the local computers and the network is supposed to wipe them when you log off but if you remote into the computer there is another area where it keeps documents on the local computer. I'm almost positive that there is some confidential information floating in this spot on the financial aid computers. To gain access to the network you need to use your student id and pass but in the vehicle shop they are connected through a router. This router has a WEP key; if you crack it you can change your mac and whatnot, gain access to the whole server network and they wouldn't be able to trace your student ID or mac. He has a buddy that runs a computer/net security shop in town. (low and behold also someone with a degree in the 80's that didn't keep up with the times) and that network is too on WEP encryption. I looked at whole customer database one day and saw my instructors name on there. Full name, DoB, SSN, credit card info, etc. I'm sure he'd be a little on edge if he knew about any of these issues although I'm waiting for my internship at the college next year before I fix the network.

/I don't like half-assed computer "professionals". There are 3 computer repair/networking shops in town, all of them will rape you if you don't know anything about PCs because it's easy money and if you are in their shop then you don't really have much of an option for help from friends. "No I'm not interested in this computer, it's marked up over 200% of the current market value"...
 
2012-03-05 12:34:19 PM
Hack Patooey:

Give me 64 or 128 digital IO ports from this thing, and I can see a bunch of uses for it.

Do you need them all at the same time? If not, add a daughterboard with a few of these and you can get 128 digital I/Os out of 8 pins.

/ just bought some CD4051s for an Arduino project that needed more analog inputs.
 
2012-03-05 12:42:44 PM

Tenatra: It's not that I'm smarter, I'm just too advanced for the courses to get a degree in CS but I don't have enough experience to get a job in the field without it.


I'm sure you are pretty good at CS, but you are definitely not as smart as you think. If you were, you would be able to get a top job without a degree in CS, which is the one field in which schooling isn't much of a prerequisite--raw talent is far more important.

When I was in school, one of my friends used to come to our LAN parties. He wasn't in college but he was a programming wizard. After he got tired of working at Kinkos, he took an entry level tech support job at an ISP, even though it was "below his skills". Sure enough, within 6 months he was lead sysadmin. Less than a year later, he wanted to move up in the world, so he sent out his resume and within a week had landed the top sys admin job at OpenDNS.

If you are half as smart as you think you are, you could do the same thing, and you are wasting your time with classes in which you aren't learning anything to get a degree in the one field where no one really cares.
 
2012-03-05 01:03:28 PM

Vaneshi: I'd poke around the Debian site looking at their ARM version, they tend to be pretty anal about making sure that package X is available on all possible formats (I checked and it looks like FreeRadius is available but hey, I'm not fully caffinated yet) so yeah I'd give your plan a thumbs up and wish you luck and fun :)


One thing I will do (and would recommend to any other farkers out there) is install some sort of Real Time Clock before I use it for any authentication. I'm not going to risk having all my other computers fail to connect until the RADIUS syncs up to the NTP because all the authentication requests time out as 1330973993 seconds late.
 
2012-03-05 01:19:24 PM

cgalant: The Rasberry Pi is a development board PC, not a full on "computer".

I say this because I don't want the next round of orders sold out by people who are confused about what they are buying. It has no harddrive, instead using a SD card loaded with an ARM port of Linux (not included). It would be completely useless to 99% of people out there.

/use these things at work
//want one to fark with


I agree and disagree. In the raw form, yes it is useless to 99% of people. However, if they sold it along with a preloaded 16GB-32GB SD Card that gives the basic functionality of web browsing and office apps, I think it would actually fill the needs of 99% of people.
 
2012-03-05 01:26:17 PM
andrewagill:


Vaneshi: I'd poke around the Debian site looking at their ARM version, they tend to be pretty anal about making sure that package X is available on all possible formats (I checked and it looks like FreeRadius is available but hey, I'm not fully caffinated yet) so yeah I'd give your plan a thumbs up and wish you luck and fun :)

One thing I will do (and would recommend to any other farkers out there) is install some sort of Real Time Clock before I use it for any authentication. I'm not going to risk having all my other computers fail to connect until the RADIUS syncs up to the NTP because all the authentication requests time out as 1330973993 seconds late.


And by that point you might as well get a $60 mini-atx board, mount it in a Scooby-Doo lunchbox, and use it as a full-fledged net appliance booting off of a USB stick. They have onboard LAN and PCI slots for a second home so you could even use it for firewall in addition to proxy / DHCP / DNS / PXE and RADIUS.
 
2012-03-05 01:38:11 PM
@Hollie, I may take another stab at it. I've tried about a 50 mile radius around my current location (woohoo small town missouri) but the places that interviewed me were adamant about the degree, I even still had an active top secret/sci clearance at the time which was a plus for some of them. They wanted experience in obsolete technologies, and I know the degree doesn't mean shiat but it's always nice to have the degree to back yourself up just a step above those that don't have one. I have a fairly nice plan right now through the Vocational Rehabilitation program, the VA pays me to go to school and they pay the full tuition for my associates but if I maintain above a 3.0 they will pay for my BS too.

My fiancee has an uncle the works a lead job at Aflac, he said when I get my BS he will be able to get me a nice job working there.

Who knows though, I may try Kansas City (90 miles away) or Columbia (70 miles away), heavy commute but I'd have to see how much the payoff is after gas expenses
 
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