If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Photobucket)   Time for a garden thread. Who's got crocus already? Strarted your seeds yet? Any major landscaping projects lined up?   (i222.photobucket.com) divider line 284
    More: Advice  
•       •       •

4851 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2012 at 11:51 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



284 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-03-04 03:42:24 PM

MissFeasance: Marine1: Threads like this make me soooooooooooooooooooooo happy to be a 20 year old male without a spouse.

I dunno about that. I got up this morning and made my guy coffee and french toast with sugared apples and cleaned up the kitchen after last night's dinner party. He seemed pretty happy.

Question for the gardeners: last year I did basil in a pot on my back deck, and it was alive when the frosts came, so I brought it into my living room, figuring it would die. It flourished. I have a huge bush of basil now. At least three feet high, and very bushy. I've kept the flowers trimmed and watered it. The basil itself is still very tasty. I don't know what to do. Do I start a new pot? Put it back outside? Transplant it somewhere?


I'd cut off some tips, plant those, and multiply that mother.
 
2012-03-04 03:44:40 PM

expobill: Sun Worshiping Dog Launcher: Physically pulling them out of the ground is more work intensive, but has so far been more effective, especially against poison ivy (rubber gloves are necessary).
where did you place the pulled ivy?


I've got just over an acre, and alot of trees. I just throw it where I know we won't be walking. It dries out quickly here in the summer and thats the end of it.
 
2012-03-04 03:47:08 PM
wallpaper.metalship.org
 
2012-03-04 03:48:56 PM
BiffDangler :(
 
2012-03-04 04:00:01 PM
I'd love to join in but my condo has absolutely the worst sun exposure possible. Our front balcony gets hardly any direct sun and the back area is basically nothing but asphalt. I'd love to rip it out and put in some raised beds but we don't have the cash for that and I'm not sure what the other condo owners would handle that.

We tried kale, kohlrabi, chard and asparagus lettuce in the front and didn't get a whole lot. I had some peppers in a planter in the back and got some fruits but never enough at one time to make a batch of salsa. My wife wants to do upside-down tomatoes this year. I'm gonna tell her about the free tomato seeds posted up-thread.

The funny thing is that the front strip garden that is basically a Darwinian exercise in random flowering species diversity always does well. We got a crapload of morning glories, which my wife loves.

Can you plant blueberries in planters? I'd love to produce my own blueberries, and we're in Beantown, it's the right area.
 
2012-03-04 04:00:49 PM

Your Name Here: I'd love to do Saskatoons, but the soil is pretty clayey. I may have to opt for a raised bed and topsoil to remedy this in any case. I'd love to try to do this as a hugelkulture bed, but I'm not really sure if it'll work on such a small scale.


saskatoons will put up with clay -- you live in Edmonton suffice to say saskatoons will flourish as long as you give them a bit of bed prep.

I was supprised when i moved into the city for school how few people picked saskatoons. The river valley is full of them. They grow like gangbusters around stadium LRT station. Immigrants look at you weird when you just sit outside the bus stop eating berries off of trees for an hour. I think allot of people are still unaware that you can eat them.

Wich is dumb because saskatoons are the best. Simply put they are the best berry.

\You might want to consider gooseberry, or a highbush cranberry -- Anything medium sized berry plant from the prairies will do half decent in a clay soil. Amending the soil will help allot if you can afford it. Sand and organic matter. -- I heard mixing in untreated spruce chips or punky conifer wood a year or two in advance can do wonders for plants like that.

\Saskatoon pie makes other pies look like turd in a pan.
 
2012-03-04 04:02:53 PM

MissFeasance: Peppers are fun. My husband does three planters on the back deck, harvests them as they ripen, and makes some kick-ass hot sauce. I don't even know what all is in that, but it's hot hot hot.


this. Most of our garden is all salsa ingredients... and my idea. The Mrs. just wanted her strawberries.

 
2012-03-04 04:18:02 PM
Tomato starts in the greenhouse to be put in the soil in a week or two.
 
2012-03-04 04:19:20 PM
And trying a "three sisters" garden plot this year. I may have jumped the gun a little, but got away with it last year until the drouth killed the world down here...
 
2012-03-04 04:21:32 PM
I started my garden around Christmas.

After things started poking through, I mulched with sugar cane mulch and things looked like this:

babylon-1.com
babylon-1.com

Six weeks later I had this:

babylon-1.com
babylon-1.com

Come next Fall, if I'm still at the same house, I'm building a really long raised bed that'll be the base for a trellis that reaches the roof - for cucumbers, which went absolutely nuts BTW. Not only will it be a good privacy screen on that side of the house, but it'll keep the sun off that side of the house. Summers in Brisbane can be a bit warm and houses built 30 years ago aren't the most insulated, so they're giant hot boxes.
 
2012-03-04 04:21:57 PM
All my stuff is indoors, under LED. Everything except bulbs and roses. Year-round herbs and fruits/vegetables, cheap.
 
2012-03-04 04:25:30 PM
Hooray! The almonds are blossoming! They were not this morning when I posted but now they are!
 
2012-03-04 04:29:43 PM
Been working on a new pergola for the side yard walkway I have been constructing for a completed redo of my side yard I have been working on since last July. Replaced the whole side yard by hand: three yards of soil to level it out, landscaping, retaining wall, pavers, electrical and drainage. Waiting for the spring to finish and move on to stage two, the front walk and drive way. I'll need to replant the flower beds after...
 
2012-03-04 04:35:08 PM

theorellior:
Can you plant blueberries in planters? I'd love to produce my own blueberries, and we're in Beantown, it's the right area.


Big planters, yes. Although I've heard of some dwarf species of blueberries that can be raised in windowboxes, I've never tried those. You do need more than one variety of blueberry, because they aren't self-fertile.

I have blueberries in brick raised beds. I can grow most other small fruits (I have 20 something varieties of berries) but my soil ranges from 7.9 to 8.75 as far as pH goes, and blueberries need acid soil...so, mine are up 18 inches, and in a heavy-peat growing mix with pH around 4.5.

It isn't a good source for specialty things like dwarf blueberries, but for normal ones, I swear by http://noursefarms.com/ (new window) I think I grow everything they sell except asparagus (we're building a deep bed of sandy soil just for it) and horseradish (which grows as a weed ALL OVER around here because people planted it 50 years ago)
 
2012-03-04 04:36:25 PM
I just came back in from a long day outside.

Pulled up the gnarly carrots, I mean, GNARLY, looking like troll feet. Did chop them up and left them on the lawn for the squirrels, bunsters and anything else coming out of hibernation.

Trimmed the front shrubs, all of them, Planted two flats of giant pansies, and painted the front banister. Tomorrow I have to get up early and rake the backyard and mow it too. All for good reason, the fellow from the bank is coming to appraise the house, we're doing a refi at 3.25 percent. WAHOO!!!! Next week I'll be painting the front and the back decks and the back door. And I have so rake out the tomato beds and dig in some amendments. Etc etc.

I expect I'll sleep good tonight, with a benadryl and two aleve. I'm whooped.

SF
 
2012-03-04 04:40:21 PM

melopene: My dad and I got our seeds started this morning. I just wanted to throw an extra-special shout-out to muck4doo for being so awesome and sending me those heirloom tomato and eggplant seeds. We're really looking forward to seeing how they turn out :)


You're very welcome. :)
 
2012-03-04 04:47:40 PM
I have a half acre in a Seattle suburb (220' x 110') with a stream across one corner. From the upper corner to the opposite lower corner there's a 40 foot drop in elevation, so I've been working on terracing the sloped parts for a couple of years. The soil is mostly glacial till. Last week I bought an old dump truck so I'm going to spend the spring hauling in rock, sand, and topsoil. It took me 3 years to get a decent-looking lawn on the flat parts. If I can get the terracing done soon on the steep part in the upper corner, I might try some tomatoes or something this year. Aside from the grass, about all I've planted so far is some Thuja Green Giants around the perimeter and some boxwood along the front of the house. I spend a lot of time in Vegas and I really like all the fountains and topiary around the strip Casinos. I'm probably going to end up doing a lot of that here rather than flowers.
 
2012-03-04 05:00:34 PM
Working on my tomato seedlings today, and things haven't been as smooth as they've been in the past. I started them the 1st week of January, and most are doing well, but others don't look so good. So I may have to start them again. There's been quite a few changes at home since last year which haven't allowed me to give them all the tender loving care they got in the past. Here's my list of tomatoes I'm growing this year:


African Togo, Anna Russian, Arkansas Traveler, Aunt Ginny's Purple, Aunt Ruby's German Green, Aussie, Belize Pink Heart, Berkeley Tie Dye, Beryl Beauty, Black Cherry, Black Krim, Black Sea Man, Bloody Butcher, Brandywine-Cowlicks, Carbon, Cherokee Purple, Clint Eastwood Rowdy Red, Earl's Faux, Early Annie, Flamme, Giant Belgium, Pineapple, Hillbilly, Japanese Black Trifele, Jet Star, Kellog's Breakfast, Lime Green Salad, Marianna's Peace, Marmande, Mortgage Lifter, Mr. Bruno, Muchamiel, Paul Robeson, Persimmon, Pork Chop, Principe Borghese, Purple Calabash, Purple Dog Creek, Ramapo, Red Zebra, San Marzano, Stump of The World, Sungold, Tasmanian Chocolate, Tondo Liscio, Texas Star, Viva Lindsey, and Rutgers.

Not all for me. Some are going to friends and family. Hoping everything is planted in another couple of weeks with them, except the ones I will have to start over. Still have to start my peppers.
 
2012-03-04 05:17:57 PM

Earguy: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]
"Here in da tropics, it's always spring, mon."


Came here for this.....
 
2012-03-04 05:22:48 PM
I read this as
SeedFreak Planted two flats of giant pansiespenises

Which just made Trimmed the front shrubs, all of them that much funnier.
 
2012-03-04 05:25:05 PM

penthesilea: This is my second spring living in this house. There are some random daffodils coming up in my backyard that I didn't plant.

I want to dig in and make a garden, but someone who owned this place before us buried all kinds of glass and metal crap in the yard. Broken beer bottles, whole light bulbs, some canning supplies, balled up chicken coop wire and nails. I even unearthed an entire rake.

Half tempted to just put some weed blocking cloth over sections of it and just make some raised beds. Forget digging out all the debris.


Black weed cloth will not solve this problem which is more of an opportunity for you.
You can not really ignore what the jerks left in your garden. You will always know that shiat is there. I have also dug all the crap out that the "formers" left. Don't just cover it up and be party to their ignorance. Your raised beds need the soil in which the refuse lies and you don't want to hurt your hands, so wear good garden gloves.

A long handed shovel gives the user more leverage so that the back muscles are protected; avoid a short "D" handle shovel. Men with good upper body strength find these O-K, but not- so-much -women who have more strength in their legs.

Separate the crap from the earth, and make appropriate arrangements with the garbage collectors. Make a compost pile where you can, lay any brush or sticks at the bottom (they'll provide air to the bottom of the pile before they decompose.) Any sod weeds etc, fling 'em in the compost and continue all summer.
Use only uncooked organic material in the compost, avoid meat too. The difference is between aerobic and anaerobic bacterial action. Anaerobic stinks and decomposition is slow: aerobic is fast and hot. I make about two yards of garden compost a year.

The classic method is the French Intensive Raised bed. Check "Organic Gardening Magazine" by Rodale Press. You can, if you wish ask me how to do this here if you want. It's an explanation, but I'm willing. This is always how I start a garden unless it is heavy clay subsoil. If you want to know more just ask.

Ingredients to incorporate into the soil: Aged Manure , about 20 40lb. bags. I can get ten in my trunk at a time. This contains Nitrogen which makes leaves, Phosphorous, for roots and flowers, and Potassium for stems and leaf blades. These are the three macro-nutrients listed on any bag of organic (or chemical fertilizer which I do not use.) This bagged manure is reliable and helps the structure of any soil. Soil structure is known as tilth, The optimum soil is a friable loam made up of organic matter. When people amend their soils whether they are clay based or sandy, organic matter must be incorporated if the tilth is to be improved.

Manure contains the macro nutrients necessary but many other amendments contain these and micro-nutrients as well. My favorite is worm manure which is really only feasible to use if you live near a "nightcrawler" bait farm. ( I've seen bags of worm casting in garden supply stores for outrageous sums.) I get six yards delivered from the farm for about $40.00 per yard. This stuff is the best for topdressing lawns as well as mixing into everything. It is pure black and percolates through the soil.
Agricultural grade diatomaceous earth is comprised of long dead little sea critters which contain Phosphorous in a pretty neutral ph. and is rich in a massive list of micro-nutrients plants love. (Very fine grades of diatomaceous earth are used as an organic insecticide as they lacerate an insect's exoskeleton whereupon it dehydrates. These also kills beneficial insects as well as the ones intended and are to be used with caution. Avoid breathing dust.)

Sea kelp is a great soil conditioner and is full of micro-nutrients; also your property will smell like the beach. Lots of iron, boron and on and on.
Blood meal ( 2 lb. box ) is very rich in available nitrogen and smells so that animal pests stay the hell away. Bone meal (2lb.) box is rich in phosphorous and because it also stinks like death will keep critters away. (people with deer problems, take note) Plants are not vegetarian.
I like wood ashes for potassium, but will use store types; be advised by an experienced greenhouse person in your area for general soil types and ph factors; you can also buy a little kit to test for ph.

A box of dolomitic limestone helps neutralize the acid ph of bone and blood meal and transforms nitrogen so that it becomes available to be taken up by the plant roots.
Once I ordered yards and yards of horse manure (in my early learning days) and it
had not properly decomposed and was full if yellow straw. The result was very poor foliar growth. I did not know about the benefits of limestone at the time, but the tilth the following year was great.

Louise Riotte is a published expert on companion planting which is the lore gardeners need. A tip from her "Roses Love Garlic": Garlic planted near roses increases their health and scent and protects all members of Rosaceae family from fungal disease . Garlic ( or any alliums) planted near legumes (Peas, beans etc.) inhibits their growth. Legumes planted one year will increase the nitrogen availability in that spot for the following crop of leafy veggies. (Legumes have nitrogen fixing nodules on their roots making it an available nutrient the following season.)

Warning for those wanting to bring in top-soil. This is a big scam now. Often what is sold as topsoil or triple mix) is in fact subsoil (building sites) peat-moss (I never use it) and sand. The large super sacs of "black earth" provide a pretty surface but are low in organic ingredients. The composition looks like black peat, bark mulch and sand to me although I could be wrong. It's a medium that needs feeding; lots of people use it in combination with water table contaminating soluble chemicals . (Makes sign of cross)

Someone said they live near Mennonites? Get your wagon, 'cause those folks know how to make the best natural fertilizers including the true "black earth" of which you don't need much.

I live in zone 4-5 depending on who you ask. Raised beds in the urban environment are my specialty. I grew corn in a large raised bed on my driveway last year. I'll send photos. Seven to eight feet high, full ears of pearls, variety "Ivory", companion planted with Chinese Winter Melon. It ruled my neighborhood.

The most unwelcome invasive tree species here is The Norway Maple, still planted by cities as a street tree (not cultivars Crimson King or Drummondii) has invaded the
forests to the detriment of the Sugar Maple.

My favorite invasive tree (declared as a weed) is Ailanthus Altissima , Tree of Heaven.
It was brought to North America in 1784 by the Chinese according to Michael Dirr , author of "Manual of Woody Landscape Plants". Locally known as Stinkweed Tree, it fills in all cracks in parking lots and grows to a fine height while it acts as a massive anti- pollutant, which is why it was brought from China in the first place.
 
2012-03-04 05:29:07 PM
If you're still trying to decide what to plant you might want consider this

Fairy tale eggplant. They only grow about 18" high, have very nice flowers and little 2.5-3" eggplants that you can cook in a variety of ways. We grew ours in a pot and it thrived and gave us two crops of eggplant. If we got it in sooner we would have have three.

We were give one as a gift last year and it was the most fun of our veggies.
 
2012-03-04 05:30:33 PM
Serrano, jalapeño, and Anaheim chilis in the hydro, basil in hydro & dirt. Carrots, tomatoes, and pickling cucumbers all in dirt. :) I SO hope these suckers survive. I tend to be a plant killer...
 
2012-03-04 05:46:12 PM
My lone tabasco was pruned-back for the winter, but is coming up strong now. In another 2-4 weeks, it can probably go outside. Been thinking about growing bell pepper and maybe Hungarian Wax peppers. That might be cool to make my own paprika, and I can eat bell peppers like apples; they're so good.
 
2012-03-04 05:51:49 PM

khyberkitsune: All my stuff is indoors, under LED. Everything except bulbs and roses. Year-round herbs and fruits/vegetables, cheap.


Any recommendations for lights? I live in a third-floor condo with an east-facing balcony and a wall that provides complete shade by noon--nice as a recreational space, but I don't think potted tomatoes and peppers are going to like it.
 
2012-03-04 06:00:48 PM
<b><a href="http://www.fark.com/comments/6975926/75357683#c75357683" target="_blank">Ghryswald</a>:</b> <i>I started my garden around Christmas.

After things started poking through, I mulched with sugar cane mulch and things looked like this:

[babylon-1.com image 350x469]
[babylon-1.com image 350x469]

Six weeks later I had this:

[babylon-1.com image 350x469]
[babylon-1.com image 350x469]

Come next Fall, if I'm still at the same house, I'm building a really long raised bed that'll be the base for a trellis that reaches the roof - for cucumbers, which went absolutely nuts BTW. Not only will it be a good privacy screen on that side of the house, but it'll keep the sun off that side of the house. Summers in Brisbane can be a bit warm and houses built 30 years ago aren't the most insulated, so they're giant hot boxes.</i>

Soo healthy !
 
2012-03-04 06:01:20 PM

delta_pwnd: WhackingDay: So, what are the best tomatoes for making sauces? I did get some Romas last year, but I thought they were a little tough.

Had great luck with an italian heirloom variety called cour di boue. (oxheart) Great as sauce or slicer. Just finished last jar of sauce last night and ordered more seeds for this season. Am down to Cherokee purples and cour di bue as my main tom crops now.


That's amazing! An elderly Italian lady in my neighborhood gave me some oxheart seeds two years ago. She got the original plants from the southern states 35 years ago and has been saving seeds growing and giving them away when she meets other gardeners. The fruit is massive with good flavor but it's mainly a plum or fleshy variety for cooking, right? I like a really bright flavor with fresh tomatoes, so I've been saving seeds from the best tasting beefsteaks I've grown. I will try the Cherokee purples for sure. Thanks for the tip. Do you grow borage with tomatoes? It's said to improve health and flavor of the plants. Also you can cook and eat it when it's young (better than spinach) and when mature the lovely starry blue to violet flowers are edible and gorgeous on salads and as a garnish.
 
2012-03-04 06:06:32 PM

Englebert Slaptyback: bearcats1983

We're going to have to build a french drain from the side of the house down the street sometime in the next month or so. They don't seem to be too much work; just a shiatload of digging. It's going to be about 40-50 feet of trenching to make this lead out to the street. Hopefully we get the time to do this before the big Spring rains start.

Has anyone built one before? I can handle the digging, but making sure the grade drops enough will take some extra effort.


You should probably get an actual engineer to help you with that. You'll also need to get permits, especially if there is anyone downhill from you.


You don't need an engineer to dig a ditch for farks sake. It's not hard. Water flows downhill. And if he stays on his land and leads to an existing drainage ditch (or the like) adjacent to his property he probably doesn't need a permit either. I recommend burying a PVC pipe and burying lots of shells and rocks wherever the water currently pools.
 
2012-03-04 06:08:20 PM

mikefinch: Your Name Here: I'd love to do Saskatoons, but the soil is pretty clayey. I may have to opt for a raised bed and topsoil to remedy this in any case. I'd love to try to do this as a hugelkulture bed, but I'm not really sure if it'll work on such a small scale.

saskatoons will put up with clay -- you live in Edmonton suffice to say saskatoons will flourish as long as you give them a bit of bed prep.

I was supprised when i moved into the city for school how few people picked saskatoons. The river valley is full of them. They grow like gangbusters around stadium LRT station. Immigrants look at you weird when you just sit outside the bus stop eating berries off of trees for an hour. I think allot of people are still unaware that you can eat them.

Wich is dumb because saskatoons are the best. Simply put they are the best berry.

\You might want to consider gooseberry, or a highbush cranberry -- Anything medium sized berry plant from the prairies will do half decent in a clay soil. Amending the soil will help allot if you can afford it. Sand and organic matter. -- I heard mixing in untreated spruce chips or punky conifer wood a year or two in advance can do wonders for plants like that.

\Saskatoon pie makes other pies look like turd in a pan.


There are Saskatoon's growing by Stadium? That's awesome, I live about 4 blocks from there so odds are the soil composition isn't all that much different. I had looked into high bush cranberries, but I have to admit gooseberries had never occurred to me. Awfully tempting. I did start using that patch for dumping all of the organic matter I had from fall clean up, potting soil, dead annuals, dead fall apples, just in the hopes of improving the soil quality, and started dumping all the dirty water from my aquariums out there as well. Totally a crapshoot, and I suppose I may end up with a bunch of apple seedlings instead but I figured it was worth a shot since I needed to dump everything somewhere regardless. I was planning on trying to mix in some sand at the very least once the snow melts.
 
2012-03-04 06:20:57 PM

bearcats1983: Our house is on a REALLY steep hill; just a couple houses down from the crest. Unfortunately, this means that all of the run-off from the top of the hill ends up in our backyard (and waterfalls to the houses down the hill) or, most recently, in our basement. Fortunately, the leaking isn't too bad, but it's annoying to have a "damp" basement.

We're going to have to build a french drain from the side of the house down the street sometime in the next month or so. They don't seem to be too much work; just a shiatload of digging. It's going to be about 40-50 feet of trenching to make this lead out to the street. Hopefully we get the time to do this before the big Spring rains start.

Has anyone built one before? I can handle the digging, but making sure the grade drops enough will take some extra effort.


I put in one by hand, 2 feet deep at the deepest point, around a foot wide. They aren't too much work, other than the digging. You don't need an engineer, and you should not need a permit if you're sending it through just your yard to the street. The grading was the trickiest part; the best way to do it is to start at where the drain will come out at and dig backwards from there. Also, making sure the pipe slopes correctly is not as important as making sure the ground itself slopes correctly. If you fill in with gravel around the pipe, the water is naturally going to want to go the path of least resistance, which is going to be the more open gravel. I used stakes and string to do the leveling, and for the most part I did try to make the pipe do the sloping since that is pretty easy to measure. I found a pickaxe to to be the easiest thing to trench with. Also, try to install a cutout or two for future cleaning/maintenance.
 
2012-03-04 06:21:09 PM

rockradio1:

If you REALLY want to know how to grow peppers--especially HOT peppers PM me.

Why? I'll save you money every year. Even if you don't have room for a garden you can grow peppers and you can even bring them inside when it gets cold and put them back out in the Spring because you can grow them in big-buckets with a handle. (I.E. if you live in apartment or condo you can STILL have a pepper garden.) I have been doing this for 20 years so it's not like I am a n00b at this.

I REFUSE MONEY. I want nothing in return. Since so few people actually have the nads to grow their own the response will be light. I am disabled so I have some time.



PSS- I have put together all the details in a 5 page .pdf It's free. PM me and it's yours.
 
2012-03-04 06:25:48 PM

Your Name Here: , I live about 4 blocks from there


HA! Im just right across from Borden Park!

-- yeah -- the bushes along the edges there have saskatoons in them.
 
2012-03-04 06:27:01 PM
pixelsmash:

Thanks! I just copied all that to my garden file. Hopefully I'll be able to bribe my husband into driving me to the garden center in the next few weeks.
 
2012-03-04 06:29:20 PM
I want some climbing flowering plants, fragrant but not overwhelming. Suggestions? I was thinking jasmine but don't know how strong the scent is. Thanks.
 
2012-03-04 06:38:03 PM

mikefinch: Your Name Here: , I live about 4 blocks from there

HA! Im just right across from Borden Park!

-- yeah -- the bushes along the edges there have saskatoons in them.


if your interested in growing saskatoons you might want to google "saskatoon farm" -- there is a place down in Okotoks that specializes in saskatoons for orchards and they run a u-pick. Im sure if you gave them a call they could tell you how to grow a mad bush in your back yard.
 
2012-03-04 06:49:28 PM

logophile: pretty.

daffodils are up around here, but it's a sucker's bet. we're getting snow flurries tomorrow.


Same here.

The daffodils are up before the crocuses, though. WHAT THE FARK?
 
2012-03-04 07:19:59 PM
No crocus or paperwhites yet. Maybe when the snow melts I'll get a surprise!
 
2012-03-04 07:24:46 PM
Crocus has already come and gone. Daffodils are still going strong. Hellebores are at their peak in the backyard.

Looking at a terrible peach crop from the peach trees. They budded out and then it froze. Like others in the South, we haven't really had winter, just a few short days of freezing every now and then. Dreading the mosquitoes come summer.

We started out our seeds in November, and keep starting out seeds. Ran out of room in the greenhouse. There's still more seeds to plant...

It's all I can do to try to keep track of what is planted. We're not the most organized of folk, and our gardening is fairly Darwinian.

One day we hope to have acres of land. One day.

ATL, zone 7B
 
2012-03-04 07:36:05 PM

rockradio1: rockradio1:

If you REALLY want to know how to grow peppers--especially HOT peppers PM me.

Why? I'll save you money every year. Even if you don't have room for a garden you can grow peppers and you can even bring them inside when it gets cold and put them back out in the Spring because you can grow them in big-buckets with a handle. (I.E. if you live in apartment or condo you can STILL have a pepper garden.) I have been doing this for 20 years so it's not like I am a n00b at this.

I REFUSE MONEY. I want nothing in return. Since so few people actually have the nads to grow their own the response will be light. I am disabled so I have some time.



PSS- I have put together all the details in a 5 page .pdf It's free. PM me and it's yours.


You do rock. I'm really impressed. I, myself am like a fundamentalist preacher (irritating) for the health benefits and just the gardening knowledge that just has to be passed on. There are also so many things which are easy to grow and are delicious but they are not found in stores. My favorite is French sorrel. It has tender lemony leaves when young. As the plant matures (spinach sized plant) it puts up seed spikes. Cut those off. Sorrel has oxalic acid in it and helps keep a clear complexion, is great with fish, and makes a fantastic soup. It's also perennial. I bet you could have pots of it quite easily. I'll have to get your pepper info. Who said nasturtium flowers are delicious? Yes they are! Rose petals, nasturtiums, calendula! Oh my!
 
2012-03-04 07:44:20 PM

Phins: I want some climbing flowering plants, fragrant but not overwhelming. Suggestions? I was thinking jasmine but don't know how strong the scent is. Thanks.


There are different varieties of jasmine, and I am not sure which variety you are familiar with. The traditional common jasmine (Jasminum officinale) has a tendency to grow straight up and leave a lot of empty space lower down, flowers only once a year in the spring and has been described as having an overwhelming fragrance by some. Try instead either Trachelospermum jasminoides (commonly known as confederate jasmine or trader's compass) or Jasminum multiflorum (common name star jasmine, winter jasmine, or indian jasmine) depending on what suits your climate, they have longer flowering periods, more even plant growth and while the flowers are sweetly scented they are not as strong as those of the common jasmine.
 
2012-03-04 07:56:03 PM

Sun Worshiping Dog Launcher: bearcats1983: Our house is on a REALLY steep hill; just a couple houses down from the crest. Unfortunately, this means that all of the run-off from the top of the hill ends up in our backyard (and waterfalls to the houses down the hill) or, most recently, in our basement. Fortunately, the leaking isn't too bad, but it's annoying to have a "damp" basement.

We're going to have to build a french drain from the side of the house down the street sometime in the next month or so. They don't seem to be too much work; just a shiatload of digging. It's going to be about 40-50 feet of trenching to make this lead out to the street. Hopefully we get the time to do this before the big Spring rains start.

Has anyone built one before? I can handle the digging, but making sure the grade drops enough will take some extra effort.

I put in one by hand, 2 feet deep at the deepest point, around a foot wide. They aren't too much work, other than the digging. You don't need an engineer, and you should not need a permit if you're sending it through just your yard to the street. The grading was the trickiest part; the best way to do it is to start at where the drain will come out at and dig backwards from there. Also, making sure the pipe slopes correctly is not as important as making sure the ground itself slopes correctly. If you fill in with gravel around the pipe, the water is naturally going to want to go the path of least resistance, which is going to be the more open gravel. I used stakes and string to do the leveling, and for the most part I did try to make the pipe do the sloping since that is pretty easy to measure. I found a pickaxe to to be the easiest thing to trench with. Also, try to install a cutout or two for future cleaning/maintenance.


------

As my grandfather used to say "Don't waste a hole". Any time you are digging a long trench across your property (especially by hand) spend a couple of extra bucks and toss in (and cap) one or two runs of 3/4" or 1" PVC near the bottom for "future build-out" along with whatever else you're dumping in there. Some day you may want to run some other service in that direction, water, a wire or cable of some kind, or even compressed air, and that part of the job will already be done for you.

Digging in virgin soil is a piece of cake. You can use heavy equipment with abandon. Once something is buried though, you don't want to dig the same hole again. The second time will be mostly hand digging so you don't tear up what's in the ground.

Also, it's always a good idea to mark the trench. If you're down 2 feet, backfill about a foot, add some marking tape the length of the trench, then fill the rest. I like to use crime scene tape whenever I can score some, just to mess with future archaeologists.
 
2012-03-04 08:26:12 PM

expobill: 2 years ago a tomato blight from Pennsylvania wiped out a my sister's garden of over 100 tomatoes and every one else's in NJ.
rumor had it that the blight could have been contained.


As someone who suffered the Great Tomato Blight two years in a row, I'd like to hear some details about this rumor.

/I know, I know, asking for a detailed rumor is like asking for military intelligence
//oxymoron
///gardener
 
2012-03-04 08:31:56 PM

muck4doo: Working on my tomato seedlings today, and things haven't been as smooth as they've been in the past. I started them the 1st week of January, and most are doing well, but others don't look so good. So I may have to start them again. There's been quite a few changes at home since last year which haven't allowed me to give them all the tender loving care they got in the past. Here's my list of tomatoes I'm growing this year:


African Togo, Anna Russian, Arkansas Traveler, Aunt Ginny's Purple, Aunt Ruby's German Green, Aussie, Belize Pink Heart, Berkeley Tie Dye, Beryl Beauty, Black Cherry, Black Krim, Black Sea Man, Bloody Butcher, Brandywine-Cowlicks, Carbon, Cherokee Purple, Clint Eastwood Rowdy Red, Earl's Faux, Early Annie, Flamme, Giant Belgium, Pineapple, Hillbilly, Japanese Black Trifele, Jet Star, Kellog's Breakfast, Lime Green Salad, Marianna's Peace, Marmande, Mortgage Lifter, Mr. Bruno, Muchamiel, Paul Robeson, Persimmon, Pork Chop, Principe Borghese, Purple Calabash, Purple Dog Creek, Ramapo, Red Zebra, San Marzano, Stump of The World, Sungold, Tasmanian Chocolate, Tondo Liscio, Texas Star, Viva Lindsey, and Rutgers.

Not all for me. Some are going to friends and family. Hoping everything is planted in another couple of weeks with them, except the ones I will have to start over. Still have to start my peppers.


Wow! That's a massive list of tomatoes. I don't start tomatoes under lights or this early; I know most do. I found they contracted damp-off too easily. My friend uses a fan and that helps air-circulation around those fuzzy translucent stems. I discovered if the plants are watered only with cooled chamomile tea , which has anti-fungal properties, damp-off decreased, but only with good air circulation.

Now, I soak and germinate all seeds in coffee filters in cups inside (even my precious corn). Then I transplant seedlings into a planting mix of my own device and baby-sit the hell out of everybody in moving them around to catch the sun, and do the little dears need a blanky? etc. etc. Everybody could use a farmer's almanac and look up gardening using the moon's signs. Even if you don't "believe" it sure helps organizing the seeds. I don't believe; I know. The hell with you Carl Sagan; yah, I'm punchy, now. This is definitely my last post. Bio-dynamic gardening is good for the planet. Garden-on, lovely Farkers.
 
2012-03-04 08:41:00 PM
My little 6' x 16' garden is almost ready for planting season. The next step is to add a bit of manure and then as many tomatoes as whatever breed I pick will fit. I've had bad luck with Romas the past few years. I get 20+ lbs of unripe tomatoes per plant wiped out by frost in the fall.

/I was promised farking global warming
//still waiting for a longer growing season
 
2012-03-04 09:02:01 PM
Has anyone here done peas in a container garden? If I use a long pot and planted in one row per pot, what should I use to let them climb? I've always used chicken wire in an actual garden. This year, I'm container gardening cherry tomatoes, jalapenos, cat nip, radishes, and peas.
 
2012-03-04 09:29:21 PM
Mrs. Phamwaa forced a few tulip bulbs this week. Unfortunately, it's a bit early to be putting them out, so they're blooming like crazy in the living room right now.
 
2012-03-04 09:39:47 PM
We got our hyacinths a couple of weeks ago, as well as the forsythias. Tulips are up now and the Bradford pears are all blooming. Love the South!
 
2012-03-04 11:13:23 PM
About to close on our first house here in southern California; can't wait to rip out the overgrown bamboo forest (wish us luck) and put in some raised beds!

The house comes with mature lemon, orange, lime, and fig trees, and we've got a Landreth seed order for all kinds of vegetables (peppers, tomatos, squashes, lettuces, etc...).

For herbs, I'm going to plant rosemary, sage, basil, and container-plant some mint. Maybe eventually we'll add an olive tree. I'd love to grow some corn, too. This is in addition to my succulent collection that will be added to the already-existing succulents and cacti at the house.

The first thing I'm going to plant is star jasmine. No house in the Los Angeles area is complete without star jasmine.
 
2012-03-04 11:45:57 PM
t0.gstatic.com

I'm a mantis, not a crocus.
 
2012-03-04 11:56:57 PM

pixelsmash: muck4doo: Working on my tomato seedlings today, and things haven't been as smooth as they've been in the past. I started them the 1st week of January, and most are doing well, but others don't look so good. So I may have to start them again. There's been quite a few changes at home since last year which haven't allowed me to give them all the tender loving care they got in the past. Here's my list of tomatoes I'm growing this year:


African Togo, Anna Russian, Arkansas Traveler, Aunt Ginny's Purple, Aunt Ruby's German Green, Aussie, Belize Pink Heart, Berkeley Tie Dye, Beryl Beauty, Black Cherry, Black Krim, Black Sea Man, Bloody Butcher, Brandywine-Cowlicks, Carbon, Cherokee Purple, Clint Eastwood Rowdy Red, Earl's Faux, Early Annie, Flamme, Giant Belgium, Pineapple, Hillbilly, Japanese Black Trifele, Jet Star, Kellog's Breakfast, Lime Green Salad, Marianna's Peace, Marmande, Mortgage Lifter, Mr. Bruno, Muchamiel, Paul Robeson, Persimmon, Pork Chop, Principe Borghese, Purple Calabash, Purple Dog Creek, Ramapo, Red Zebra, San Marzano, Stump of The World, Sungold, Tasmanian Chocolate, Tondo Liscio, Texas Star, Viva Lindsey, and Rutgers.

Not all for me. Some are going to friends and family. Hoping everything is planted in another couple of weeks with them, except the ones I will have to start over. Still have to start my peppers.

Wow! That's a massive list of tomatoes. I don't start tomatoes under lights or this early; I know most do. I found they contracted damp-off too easily. My friend uses a fan and that helps air-circulation around those fuzzy translucent stems. I discovered if the plants are watered only with cooled chamomile tea , which has anti-fungal properties, damp-off decreased, but only with good air circulation.

Now, I soak and germinate all seeds in coffee filters in cups inside (even my precious corn). Then I transplant seedlings into a planting mix of my own device and baby-sit the hell out of everybody in moving them around to cat ...


I like the tips you've given, and will try some. The reason i start early on seeding is just plain Austin weather. March, April, and May tend to be decent here, but as soon as June or late May starts there is a good chance for blossom drop with the heat. I've got a south east facing growing area for my toms, that gets a break at about 1:30 to 2:00 with shade before the real oppressive summer heat hits here. Of course, even then the shade doesn't completely protect when it is 105 degrees out at 5:00 peak time. It's been fun figuring out Austin since I moved here 10 years ago from San Jose. San Jose can get hot too(not Austin hot), but that peak time was 3:00 there.
 
Displayed 50 of 284 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report