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(Shadowlocked)   Top 10 silent films to watch after 'The Artist'   (shadowlocked.com) divider line 104
    More: Interesting, silent films, propaganda films, Buster Keaton, Cecil B. DeMille, Nosferatu, Billy Wilder, Michel Hazanavicius, sight gags  
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3355 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 01 Mar 2012 at 10:35 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-01 10:03:19 AM  
List fails without "Birth of a Nation".
 
2012-03-01 10:15:46 AM  

albert71292: List fails without "Birth of a Nation".


I don't know if you're joking or not but that's the first movie they show you in film school. It was the first film to use all the most basic camera techniques any filmmaker uses today. It actually was the most innovative film ever.

....and it's the story of the triumph of the will of the black man in a new nation. Watch it with your African American friends.
 
2012-03-01 10:38:40 AM  
I have seen seven of those ten, and they are all awesome. I just got the Blu-Ray of the (mostly) complete "Metropolis" and watched it wall-size with a digital projector. So much win.
 
2012-03-01 10:41:51 AM  
I'm a big fan of Weimar Period German cinema, so I'm really getting a kick......

I would have added The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, but I don't know what I would have removed to make room for it.
 
2012-03-01 10:43:52 AM  
List fails without Mel Brooks' "Silent Movie."
 
2012-03-01 10:45:57 AM  

Optimal_Illusion: List fails without Mel Brooks' "Silent Movie."


NON!
 
2012-03-01 10:45:59 AM  
Forgot the best one
i583.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-01 10:48:51 AM  
Okay, I've finally seen both "The Artist" and "Hugo". How did Scorcese not win again? I'm confused.

Scorcese should now have three oscars for best director: Raging Bull, Goodfellas and Hugo. Look at the history. Also, Letters of Iwo Jima should have beaten The Departed.

I'm fed up with this world!
 
2012-03-01 10:50:05 AM  
Porn on mute.
 
2012-03-01 10:50:50 AM  
No Harold Lloyd?!?

If you don't see any of his films, at least pick up a copy of Harold Lloyd's Hollywood Nudes in 3D!
 
2012-03-01 10:52:14 AM  
Here's a word up for The Big Parade.
 
2012-03-01 10:52:23 AM  

carmody: I have seen seven of those ten, and they are all awesome. I just got the Blu-Ray of the (mostly) complete "Metropolis" and watched it wall-size with a digital projector. So much win.


Potemkin and Wings are great on BD as well

Wish they'd get around to Nosferatu and Passion of Joan of Arc
 
2012-03-01 10:52:26 AM  
All excellent suggestions, and glad to see The Passion of Joan of Arc in the #1 slot. That film is simply stunning.

I'll also throw a recommendation out there for Alfred Hitchcock's The Lodger, a great Jack the Ripper story and the best of Hitchcock's early work. Just be sure to get the restored version, not one of those crappy public domain prints.

Also, I agree that offensive content or not, Birth of a Nation belongs on any such list. It's one of the most important movies of all time.
 
2012-03-01 10:53:49 AM  
I didn't know they made a silent movie about Thomas Haden Church...

images.zap2it.com
 
2012-03-01 10:54:47 AM  

dutchoven69: Okay, I've finally seen both "The Artist" and "Hugo". How did Scorcese not win again? I'm confused.

Scorcese should now have three oscars for best director: Raging Bull, Goodfellas and Hugo. Look at the history. Also, Letters of Iwo Jima should have beaten The Departed.

I'm fed up with this world!


Hugo was fun, but there's a jarring tone shift when they finally get the automaton working. As one reviewer said, it goes from being about kids' problems to being about adults' problems.

Also, list fails without Pandora's Box.

/And The Gold Rush or City Lights is better than The Tramp.
 
2012-03-01 10:56:12 AM  

Mugato: albert71292: List fails without "Birth of a Nation".

I don't know if you're joking or not but that's the first movie they show you in film school. It was the first film to use all the most basic camera techniques any filmmaker uses today. It actually was the most innovative film ever.

....and it's the story of the triumph of the will of the black man in a new nation. Watch it with your African American friends.


They'll love the part where black people take over the state legislature and eat friend chicken and watermelon in the chamber. And the part where the Reconstruction Era South is saved by the heroic Ku Klux Klan while Wagner blares in the background.

/I know it was 1915
//it's still an appalling film
///though technically marvelous
 
2012-03-01 10:56:16 AM  
Svengali with John Barrymore.
 
2012-03-01 10:57:10 AM  
"Sunrise: A song of two humans"
 
2012-03-01 11:00:12 AM  
Glad to see The General on the list. Kida bummed only one Chaplin film. I think I might have gone with Modern Times
 
2012-03-01 11:01:07 AM  

Mugato: albert71292: List fails without "Birth of a Nation".

I don't know if you're joking or not but that's the first movie they show you in film school. It was the first film to use all the most basic camera techniques any filmmaker uses today. It actually was the most innovative film ever.

....and it's the story of the triumph of the will of the black man in a new nation. Watch it with your African American friends.


I was suggesting it because of the advancements it made in cinematography, not the subject matter. It's an important film, even though controversial.
 
2012-03-01 11:01:09 AM  
newspaper.li

Semi-serious, at least for the TV series(first movie was good, too). While there is audio, Mr Bean is very much in the tradition of Chaplin's Tramp
 
2012-03-01 11:12:22 AM  

bhcompy: Semi-serious, at least for the TV series(first movie was good, too). While there is audio, Mr Bean is very much in the tradition of Chaplin's Tramp


I know there's no accounting for taste, but it always surprises me when people say they liked that godawful Mr Bean in America movie, especially when they say they liked it more than the more recent film. Les Vacances de M. Haricot was much more consistent with the television series.
 
2012-03-01 11:12:31 AM  
If you watch passion of Joan of Arc, watch the version with the Richard Einhorn's "Voices of Light" soundtrack backing it.

Great movie
 
2012-03-01 11:12:50 AM  

albert71292: I was suggesting it because of the advancements it made in cinematography, not the subject matter. It's an important film, even though controversial.


Yes and despite the lame jokes I made, I was sincere in that it was the most influential movie ever made technologically-wise. It's a shame that it can't be referenced outside of film school just because of its subject matter and it can't be looked at objectively.
 
2012-03-01 11:13:44 AM  

albert71292: List fails without "Birth of a Nation".


It's seminal, it's culturally very important, but is it an entertaining movie to watch even now?
 
2012-03-01 11:15:15 AM  

bhcompy: Semi-serious, at least for the TV series(first movie was good, too).


No, it was not.

I like Greed, or at least what's left of it, but that may be asking a bit much from people. And not every silent movie is older than your dead grandma. While not technically silent, Chomet's Triplets of Belleville or The Illusionist both tell a story without words.
 
2012-03-01 11:17:44 AM  
Shhhhh... there's too much talking in this thread.
 
2012-03-01 11:21:34 AM  
I first saw "The General" in a film class with a professor droning away in the background. Didn't really strike me. However, I recently saw the TCM revival with the original score - and, man, that's a great movie and surprisingly funny. I appreciated the fact that TCM gave a little screen time at the end credits to the small (volunteer?) orchestra that played the score.

And "Wings" is indeed an awesome movie.
 
2012-03-01 11:23:03 AM  

padraig: It's seminal, it's culturally very important, but is it an entertaining movie to watch even now?


For anyone interested in film beyond as an escapist entertainment medium, I'd say so, yes. I find it entertaining to watch in ways that are unrelated to its story. Wouldn't sit down and watch it for shiats and giggles, but if I'm in The Art of Film mode it's certainly something I'd watch. Thinking about the context in which it was made and seeing these quantum leaps in film take place on screen can be very entertaining.
 
2012-03-01 11:25:51 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop:
Hugo was fun, but there's a jarring tone shift when they finally get the automaton working. As one reviewer said, it goes from being about kids' problems to being about adults' problems.


Both Hugo and Drive were two movies that I probably would have loved had they not been deceptively marketed. Hugo's previews made it look to be a kid's fantasy movie, but it was about a pissed off old man. Drive's trailers went for the hardcore action/mob movie, when it was actually a romance. As they were, I walked out of each wishing I could get my money back.

Don't promise me an apple and then give me an orange.
 
2012-03-01 11:26:06 AM  

padraig:
It's seminal, it's culturally very important, but is it an entertaining movie to watch even now?


Not sure for others, but I like it enough that I bought it on Blu-ray recently, and bought it on VHS back in the 80's from Video Yesteryear.
 
2012-03-01 11:28:06 AM  

docmattic: Shhhhh... there's too much talking in this thread.


*arches eyebrows, bites first knuckle of right hand, swoons dramatically.*
 
2012-03-01 11:28:07 AM  

docmattic: Shhhhh... there's too much talking in this thread.


----3
#-:|D
 
2012-03-01 11:30:33 AM  
A good list. They should add "The Crowd."
 
2012-03-01 11:32:58 AM  

Diogenes: I'm a big fan of Weimar Period German cinema, so I'm really getting a kick......

I would have added The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, but I don't know what I would have removed to make room for it.


Came here to complain about the lack of Caligari as well. Also, any of the Mabuse movies. I mean, Metropolis, while visually interesting, has such a horrendously silly plot (the heart brings the workers and employers together...). Lang was so much better off after Thea Von Harbou.
 
2012-03-01 11:33:38 AM  

DonkeyDixon: Tyrone Slothrop:
Hugo was fun, but there's a jarring tone shift when they finally get the automaton working. As one reviewer said, it goes from being about kids' problems to being about adults' problems.

Both Hugo and Drive were two movies that I probably would have loved had they not been deceptively marketed. Hugo's previews made it look to be a kid's fantasy movie, but it was about a pissed off old man. Drive's trailers went for the hardcore action/mob movie, when it was actually a romance. As they were, I walked out of each wishing I could get my money back.

Don't promise me an apple and then give me an orange.


You must have LOOOOOOOOOVED Inglorious Bastards then.

/it's good to be surprised sometimes.
 
2012-03-01 11:33:56 AM  
Netflix online usually gives odd recommendations to me, but one in particular, "Sherlock Jr." starring Buster Keaton was interesting. I watched it and couldn't believe the special effects for the time and the chase scene at the end is hilarious.

Try "Sherlock Jr." if you get the chance.
 
2012-03-01 11:41:18 AM  

Diogenes:
I would have added The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, but I don't know what I would have removed to make room for it.


You just want us to watch it so the curse is transferred from you to one of us.
 
2012-03-01 11:41:58 AM  
The article didn't mention it, so for anyone thinking WTF am I supposed to get a silent movie, you can stream many if not all of the recommendations from Archive.org for free. Just watched Metropolis the other day and it reminded me that I need to introduce that movie to my wife.

Then we will start an Industrial band, like everyone else who's ever seen Metropolis.

Le Voyage dans la Lune (new window)

Charlie Chaplin movies (new window)

Nosferatu (new window)

Metropolis (new window)
 
2012-03-01 11:47:47 AM  
The only thing better than a silent film is a talkie.
 
2012-03-01 11:49:49 AM  
1927 Napoleon
 
2012-03-01 11:53:35 AM  

gochuck: Diogenes: I'm a big fan of Weimar Period German cinema, so I'm really getting a kick......

I would have added The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, but I don't know what I would have removed to make room for it.

Came here to complain about the lack of Caligari as well. Also, any of the Mabuse movies. I mean, Metropolis, while visually interesting, has such a horrendously silly plot (the heart brings the workers and employers together...). Lang was so much better off after Thea Von Harbou.


The plot's fine, it's being hit over the head with the subtext (or given how much it flaunts it, supertext) that makes it a lesser film. Visually amazing for the time, though.
 
2012-03-01 11:56:29 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: The plot's fine, it's being hit over the head with the subtext (or given how much it flaunts it, supertext) that makes it a lesser film. Visually amazing for the time, though.


It's a product of its time. Many of the Wiemar Period films, including Nosferatu, played with that symbolism. The mysterious force that takes us over.
 
2012-03-01 11:57:05 AM  
Metropolis for me is #1. It portrayed the distopian future of Blade Runner 60 years before Blade Runner and an android 30 years before the computer. It was the original German expressionism on film before Tim Burton was an itch in his daddy's pants. And its theme of class warfare is somewhat applicable today. Probably the most all encompassing relevant film of the silent film era.
 
2012-03-01 12:03:15 PM  
Paulette Goddard is so hot in Chaplin's Modern Times

lh6.googleusercontent.com
 
2012-03-01 12:04:45 PM  
 
2012-03-01 12:04:56 PM  

Toquinha: Optimal_Illusion: List fails without Mel Brooks' "Silent Movie."

NON!


What did he say?
 
2012-03-01 12:09:43 PM  

Tax Boy: You must have LOOOOOOOOOVED Inglorious Bastards then.

/it's good to be surprised sometimes.


Actually yes, I did love Inglorious Basterds. I don't remember any issues with expectations set up by the trailers, but I can't say as I actually remember seeing them in the first place.

Surprises are one thing, but if you're in the mood for one thing and you get blindsided by another it can be annoying at best. To wax hyperbolic, the way Hugo and Drive turned out vs what they were actually about, was like if Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone had been about the oppression of 17th century women during the Salem Witch Trials.

I'm not saying either Drive or Hugo were bad movies, but it seems like the production companies had advertised what they were really about, they knew they would have lost ticket sales, so they decided to whore themselves out to markets that had no reason to see the movies in the first place.

Imagine if this had been an actual trailer for The Shining (new window)
 
2012-03-01 12:11:06 PM  

wowzer97pooh: Sixteen seconds in you can watch a very old Buster Keaton stop a train. (new window)


Wow. That's just masterful timing. He knows exactly how to play that camera like a fiddle.
 
2012-03-01 12:12:19 PM  
Les Triplets de Belleville has sound effects, but pretty much zero dialogue. And it's absolutely fantastic.
 
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