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(Click Orlando)   Just when you've come to grips with rising gas prices, prepare yourself for water tripling in price   (clickorlando.com) divider line 158
    More: Scary, drinking water, gas prices  
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11293 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Feb 2012 at 1:24 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-28 10:05:11 AM
Many consumers could see their water bills double or even triple, as the country attempts to overhaul its aging water system over the next 25 years.

2011 (Some Guy) Who should pay for the aging water infrastructure? Baby boomers whistle and point out that they got theirs, so f*ck you (199)

2008 (usatoday.com) So you've managed to escape the collapsing bridges and crumbling roads that define American infrastructure, right? Well, good luck with the sewers (123)

2008 (MSNBC) FEMA: Levees likely to be overtopped. Rest of the nation: Uh, can we get a refund or something? (313)
2008-09-01 10:32:38 AM
Crumbling nation? U.S. infrastructure gets a 'D'

Mayors ask Congress to help fix U.S. infrastructure



Crumbling U.S. Sewage System Undermines Public Health



Compare with the financial toll of the Iraq war


/we need to take care of some crap here, at the moment.


i369.photobucket.com
 
2012-02-28 10:14:03 AM
The new oil.

/Lives in Canada where most of the world's fresh water is, so ...not terribly concerned.
//Also live in a town where it rains so much we go to England for our vacations.
///"Close my eyes, shut my brain..."
 
2012-02-28 10:48:20 AM
There are a bunch of communities in my area that are pretty unhappy about their tapwater turning flammable after the oil companies started fracking in the area.
 
2012-02-28 10:49:37 AM
yawn

next up: the sky is falling



the way I read this is that dumb-asses who didnt plan for the future will continue to get screwed by their dumb-ass decisions. Good thing that we cut taxes and spending on infrastructure.
 
2012-02-28 10:50:13 AM

unlikely: There are a bunch of communities in my area that are pretty unhappy about their tapwater turning flammable after the oil companies started fracking in the area.


lol
didnt most of them get paid to LET them frak in the first place??
 
2012-02-28 11:17:28 AM
I'll just run a hose to Lake Michigan. I'll be fine. Screw all you guys.
 
2012-02-28 11:20:04 AM
Let them drink Coke
 
2012-02-28 11:22:07 AM
Approves
www.jonathanrosenbaum.com
 
2012-02-28 11:23:11 AM

Lando Lincoln: I'll just run a hose to Lake Michigan. I'll be fine. Screw all you guys.


doesnt joliet already get chicago water??
and yah, so glad that we are not allowed to share great lake water with the desert west
 
2012-02-28 11:29:06 AM

namatad: Lando Lincoln: I'll just run a hose to Lake Michigan. I'll be fine. Screw all you guys.

doesnt joliet already get chicago water??
and yah, so glad that we are not allowed to share great lake water with the desert west


No. Plainfield gets water from Lake Michigan, but Joliet still has their own water supply. Which has a nice robust amount of radium in it. That's okay. It helps you see in the dark.
 
2012-02-28 11:49:54 AM

namatad: didnt most of them get paid to LET them frak in the first place??


No... does that happen elsewhere?
 
2012-02-28 11:58:34 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Approves




img594.imageshack.us
PROUD
 
2012-02-28 12:09:24 PM
Home Depot has tons of untapped labor
 
2012-02-28 12:55:15 PM

quatchi: The new oil.


Yup. It might not be yet, but it's going to be.
 
2012-02-28 01:10:07 PM

pudding7: Yup. It might not be yet, but it's going to be.


This an article thats spending a bit of time highlighting infrastructure problems in the US.

This "oil" analog is a bit hyperbolic as, last time i checked, you couldn't set up a plant like a desalination plant and make light sweet crude out of the substance covering most of the earths surface.

I can't make gas out of some salt water, plastic sheeting, and a pot.
 
2012-02-28 01:10:08 PM

pudding7: quatchi: The new oil.

Yup. It might not be yet, but it's going to be.


No, it's not. Oil is a rather rare resource and once you use it, it ceases to be oil. Water is all over the goddamn planet and once you use water it stays water.
 
2012-02-28 01:13:05 PM

Lando Lincoln: Water is all over the goddamn planet and once you use water it stays water.


Well, enough about American adjunct lagers.
 
2012-02-28 01:20:53 PM
This isn't new, subs. Some of us have been saying this for years. But most don't care- their water magically appears from the tap in the kitchen, back of the toilet and head of the shower.
 
2012-02-28 01:20:56 PM

Lando Lincoln: pudding7: quatchi: The new oil.

Yup. It might not be yet, but it's going to be.

No, it's not. Oil is a rather rare resource and once you use it, it ceases to be oil. Water is all over the goddamn planet and once you use water it stays water.


Let's see what happens in 20 years when there are a billion more people on this planet, and the taps in Los Angeles and Las Vegas run dry because Lake Mead is only about 12 feet deep.
 
2012-02-28 01:25:36 PM

pudding7: Lando Lincoln: pudding7: quatchi: The new oil.

Yup. It might not be yet, but it's going to be.

No, it's not. Oil is a rather rare resource and once you use it, it ceases to be oil. Water is all over the goddamn planet and once you use water it stays water.

Let's see what happens in 20 years when there are a billion more people on this planet, and the taps in Los Angeles and Las Vegas run dry because Lake Mead is only about 12 feet deep.


You realize that LA is right next to an ocean, right?
 
2012-02-28 01:26:45 PM

pudding7: Let's see what happens in 20 years when there are a billion more people on this planet, and the taps in Los Angeles and Las Vegas run dry because Lake Mead is only about 12 feet deep.


Party Boy: desalination plant

.. for starters.

The conflict issue seems to be a bigger issue for developing countries, though - and these happen to be some of the regions with exploding populations.
 
2012-02-28 01:27:51 PM

Lando Lincoln: You realize that LA is right next to an ocean, right?


Desalinization is really expensive and impractical for large scale industrial and agriculture use.
 
2012-02-28 01:31:21 PM

unlikely: There are a bunch of communities in my area that are pretty unhappy about their tapwater turning flammable after the oil companies started fracking in the area.


Entirely coincidental.
 
2012-02-28 01:32:16 PM

12349876: Lando Lincoln: You realize that LA is right next to an ocean, right?

Desalinization is really expensive and impractical for large scale industrial and agriculture use.


Dying is worse, so...my guess is, there will be some real technology investments going into desalinization in the near future.
 
2012-02-28 01:32:24 PM

12349876: Lando Lincoln: You realize that LA is right next to an ocean, right?

Desalinization is really expensive and impractical for large scale industrial and agriculture use.



Don't you know the poem? Water water everywhere, so lets all have a drink.
 
2012-02-28 01:32:39 PM
My well laughs. If that should somehow run dry, Lake Michigan is right next door.
 
2012-02-28 01:32:53 PM
Oh... and another reason I live on a well!. I can power my pump by gas, electricity and good'ol human power(tm).

Water is free as in beer :-)
 
2012-02-28 01:33:27 PM
I was just chatting with a coworker about this very issue.

I live in Eugene, Oregon, and the city is in danger of losing some of it's water rights on the McKenzie River that it feels are required to satisfy the demand that comes with future projected growth.

The solution? Sell the excess to a town down the road about 12 miles named Veneta. That town approved new residential building on the order of about 600 homes right before the real estate bubble burst, without the water resources to support such development.

The best/worst part? Eugene can legally cut the water off at anytime if they need it for their own use. And Veneta's bills will go up at least 100% to pay for the pipeline as well as the water.

Oh, and now the whole project is being sued by an environmental group, because the proposed water pipe could go through 100 ft of land that is some of the last remaining habitat for Fender's Blue Butterfly and 3 other endangered species and the increased traffic from the population growth could kill more butterflies. Farking BANANAs.

//I'm a staunch conservationist, not a preservationist though.
 
2012-02-28 01:33:56 PM

Lando Lincoln: pudding7: Lando Lincoln: pudding7: quatchi: The new oil.

Yup. It might not be yet, but it's going to be.

No, it's not. Oil is a rather rare resource and once you use it, it ceases to be oil. Water is all over the goddamn planet and once you use water it stays water.

Let's see what happens in 20 years when there are a billion more people on this planet, and the taps in Los Angeles and Las Vegas run dry because Lake Mead is only about 12 feet deep.

You realize that LA is right next to an ocean, right?


Start drinking ocean water when you're thirsty, and see where that gets you.

When that fails, and you get released from the hospital, try to create a desalinization system that can function for a city. We'll wait.
 
2012-02-28 01:33:58 PM

quatchi: The new oil.

/Lives in Canada where most of the world's fresh water is, so ...not terribly concerned.
//Also live in a town where it rains so much we go to England for our vacations.
///"Close my eyes, shut my brain..."


Where is this? I may move there.
 
2012-02-28 01:34:17 PM
I'm enjoying the seafood while I can, in another 50 years the variety might not be good as it is now.
/ I won't be around when the ocean dies, at least I hope I won't be.
 
2012-02-28 01:34:56 PM
Water wars. Begun they have.
 
2012-02-28 01:34:59 PM
The $1 trillion in water infrastructure costs over the next 25 years includes fixing leaky pipes, replacing pipelines and expanding water systems to accommodate growing populations. According to a spokesperson for the dept. of pulling outrageous, random-dartboard-with-post-it-notes-on-it numbers out of their asses. Trillion. It's the new billion© Bank of Zimbabwe, 2009
 
2012-02-28 01:35:05 PM

12349876: Lando Lincoln: You realize that LA is right next to an ocean, right?

Desalinization is really expensive and impractical for large scale industrial and agriculture use.


No, I'm pretty sure all we need is a really big plastic sheet, and a large pot.
 
2012-02-28 01:36:10 PM

unlikely: There are a bunch of communities in my area that are pretty unhappy about their tapwater turning flammable after the oil companies started fracking in the area.


I heard of those communities. They are right next door to the communities that have had flammable tap water for over a century. They should set up a meeting with them to find out how they have dealt with it all these decades and have a learning moment. Could be a win-win.
 
2012-02-28 01:36:36 PM
So instead of $23 every other month I'll get a bill for $50 or $60 six times per year? Meh. Scary is a bit melodramatic.
 
2012-02-28 01:38:18 PM
Just switch to

i2.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-02-28 01:40:04 PM

iron_city_ap: My well laughs. If that should somehow run dry, Lake Michigan is right next door.


That's what one of my uncle said. He lives 6 miles from Lake Huron. Laughed at how other people had to drill 200-300ft for water, when his was much shallower

Then the 3000 head dairy farm went in, and his formerly shallow well(90ft-100ft) had to be re-drilled to 200 ft, because the dairy sucked that much water out of the aquifer his pump started to suck sand, which of course destroyed the pump, his water softener, and water heater.
 
2012-02-28 01:42:38 PM
Just keep fracking. That will solve our energy problems.

/hey, why is all the groundwater undrinkable now?
 
2012-02-28 01:42:51 PM
My but this is coming in handy today.

Insofar as economic growth is driven by oil consumption growth, post-peak societies must adapt. Hubbert believed:[9]

"Our principal constraints are cultural. During the last two centuries we have known nothing but exponential growth and in parallel we have evolved what amounts to an exponential-growth culture, a culture so heavily dependent upon the continuance of exponential growth for its stability that it is incapable of reckoning with problems of nongrowth."


Some economists describe the problem as uneconomic growth or a false economy. At the political right, Fred Ikle has warned about "conservatives addicted to the Utopia of Perpetual Growth".[10] Brief oil interruptions in 1973 and 1979 markedly slowed - but did not stop - the growth of world GDP.[11]

Between 1950 and 1984, as the Green Revolution transformed agriculture around the globe, world grain production increased by 250%. The energy for the Green Revolution was provided by fossil fuels in the form of fertilizers (natural gas), pesticides (oil), and hydrocarbon fueled irrigation.[12]

David Pimentel, professor of ecology and agriculture at Cornell University, and Mario Giampietro, senior researcher at the National Research Institute on Food and Nutrition (INRAN), place in their study Food, Land, Population and the U.S. Economy the maximum U.S. population for a sustainable economy at 200 million. To achieve a sustainable economy world population will have to be reduced by two-thirds, says the study.[13] Without population reduction, this study predicts an agricultural crisis beginning in 2020, becoming critical c. 2050. The peaking of global oil along with the decline in regional natural gas production may precipitate this agricultural crisis sooner than generally expected. Dale Allen Pfeiffer claims that coming decades could see spiraling food prices without relief and massive starvation on a global level such as never experienced before.[14][15]
(new window)
 
2012-02-28 01:43:16 PM

Party Boy: pudding7: Let's see what happens in 20 years when there are a billion more people on this planet, and the taps in Los Angeles and Las Vegas run dry because Lake Mead is only about 12 feet deep.

Party Boy: desalination plant .. for starters.

The conflict issue seems to be a bigger issue for developing countries, though - and these happen to be some of the regions with exploding populations.


So let them learn a lesson in sustainability. Nations with irresponsible birth rates will face Malthusian catastrophes when they run out of water. It's not our job to prevent this from happening and so remove the disincentive to practice sustainable birth rates.
 
2012-02-28 01:43:22 PM

meat0918: iron_city_ap: My well laughs. If that should somehow run dry, Lake Michigan is right next door.

That's what one of my uncle said. He lives 6 miles from Lake Huron. Laughed at how other people had to drill 200-300ft for water, when his was much shallower

Then the 3000 head dairy farm went in, and his formerly shallow well(90ft-100ft) had to be re-drilled to 200 ft, because the dairy sucked that much water out of the aquifer his pump started to suck sand, which of course destroyed the pump, his water softener, and water heater.


My well is below the farm next door's
 
2012-02-28 01:47:56 PM

outtatowner: Water is free as in beer :-)


Know how I know you use Linux? ;)

Also a well owner. fark the western desert states. You assholes wanted to live out in the desert, allowed yourselves to be overpopulated and overtaxed the natural resource available to you. You already have a problem with reliably delivering power and, soon, you'll start having a problem with water and sewer. Then the shiat will really hit the fan and we'll find out just how nasty desperate people can get..
 
2012-02-28 01:48:01 PM

pudding7: the taps in Los Angeles and Las Vegas run dry because Lake Mead is only about 12 feet deep.


12 feet? My, aren't we the optimist.
 
2012-02-28 01:48:07 PM

bunner: The $1 trillion in water infrastructure costs over the next 25 years includes fixing leaky pipes, replacing pipelines and expanding water systems to accommodate growing populations. According to a spokesperson for the dept. of pulling outrageous, random-dartboard-with-post-it-notes-on-it numbers out of their asses. Trillion. It's the new billion© Bank of Zimbabwe, 2009


if only there were SOME way to force people USING the water to PAY for the water.
you move into a new house (growing populations) and you get a WATER BIIL, which includes money to pay for the water and infrastructure.

you live in the middle of nowhere, there is no water and no one to pay for it?
well fark you, MOVE ....
sucks to be you, but why should the rest of the world pay for your isolation??
 
2012-02-28 01:48:10 PM
Uh submitter, I haven't come to grips with rising gas prices yet. $4.35 a gallon here in my neck of the woods in NoCal. Fark oil companies, fark the Middle East, and fark speculators.
 
2012-02-28 01:48:28 PM
ok, this is slightly off the topic. But a co-worker asked how much my water bill was. I said " I don't pay for water " and continued working. She got really miffed and kind of got in my face and said she had a question about her water/sewer bill....and wanted to know what I paid where I live.

So I said "oh, I have a well, so that's why I said I don't pay". And I added that I don't pay for sewer either. She got really mad, like I was messing with her. Another co-worker had to explain to her what a well and septic do.

She just would not accept it. She kept saying "you can't just go pump water out of the ground...."
 
2012-02-28 01:48:48 PM
Finally, now if we could find a way to pollute that giant aquifer in the midwest my uncle T Boones holding of the worlds largest private freshwater supply in Texas will finally pay off! Thanks bottom feeders!
 
2012-02-28 01:48:50 PM

germ78: Just keep fracking. That will solve our energy problems. /hey, why is all the groundwater undrinkable now?


Hardly matters in the long run, does it? If you rely on acquifers, you'll be out of water sooner or later anyway. It's called "groundwater mining."

Aquifer drawdown or overdrafting and the pumping of fossil water increases the total amount of water in the hydrosphere, and may be responsible for up to one quarter of the Earth's total sea level rise since the beginning of the 20th century.[5] (new window)
 
2012-02-28 01:50:50 PM

www.blogcdn.com
Is this the thread where well owners come to be smug?


/well owner
//smug
 
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