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(My Fox Dallas)   Congrats on your marathon win, now give the trophy to the guy behind you   (myfoxdfw.com) divider line 41
    More: Asinine, marathons, trophy  
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4669 clicks; posted to Sports » on 27 Feb 2012 at 2:36 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-02-27 11:32:31 AM  
dumbass says what?
 
2012-02-27 11:56:59 AM  
I'm assuming the asinine tag is for the guy for not registering which takes, what, 5 minutes?
 
2012-02-27 12:00:08 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: I'm assuming the asinine tag is for the guy for not registering which takes, what, 5 minutes?


Yeah this. I mostly do trail runs, and the RDs are usually more laid back, but you'd still usually have to ask before the race if you were going to trade registrations with somebody else.
 
2012-02-27 02:43:47 PM  
Dude ran so fast the folks at registration couldn't keep up with him.
 
2012-02-27 02:46:37 PM  
If you ain't first, you're last.
 
2012-02-27 02:53:14 PM  
Technically speaking, Scott Downard won Sunday's grueling Cowtown Marathon in Fort Worth. However, the Oklahoma resident was quickly disqualified because he never registered to participate in the event.

How about "Technically speaking, Scott Downard was the first across the finish line" or something like that. "Technically" he did not win. "Technically" he was disqualified for being a moran.
 
2012-02-27 02:53:19 PM  
Wait, it was a 26 mile "marathon"? Stop misusing words!
 
2012-02-27 02:56:34 PM  

PanicMan: Wait, it was a 26 mile "marathon"? Stop misusing words!


Okay, I'm a idiot. For some reason I thought a marathon was 31 miles.
 
2012-02-27 03:01:25 PM  

PanicMan: PanicMan: Wait, it was a 26 mile "marathon"? Stop misusing words!

Okay, I'm a idiot. For some reason I thought a marathon was 31 miles.


Much like the runner with the fastest time, PanicMan sees his own error and admits it.

Dumbass? Perhaps (not PanicMan, the runner) but I'd tip my hat to the guy for not whining "it's not fair!!!"
 
2012-02-27 03:06:21 PM  
Do not bandit races that you can win.
 
2012-02-27 03:10:07 PM  

PanicMan: Okay, I'm a idiot. For some reason I thought a marathon was 31 miles.


I thought they were 26.2 miles.
 
2012-02-27 03:21:22 PM  
I have a half-marathon bib that I'm trying to sell, so I'm getting a kick out of this story.

/Seriously, who starts a conference on a Sunday?
 
2012-02-27 03:31:02 PM  
What's asinine? Even the guy disqualified didn't challenge the decision.
 
2012-02-27 03:35:04 PM  
Ah, Texas. More guns and cows than people, but the people are usually pretty polite about things.

/maybe because of all the guns
 
2012-02-27 03:38:43 PM  
We ALL know who won. By 6 minutes.

Kolin Styles is a loser
 
2012-02-27 03:40:37 PM  
It's their right to make the decision they did, and I applaud the guy for not making a fuss over it, but if he had a number and was officially timed, it really doesn't make too much of a difference. He didn't cheat in any way. I dunno, I think I'd still call him the winner even if I was the guy who came in second. Seriously, how does the "new winner" feel? Is he excited that he "won" the race without being the fastest guy in it?
 
2012-02-27 03:46:03 PM  
Semantics. He won.
 
2012-02-27 04:02:42 PM  
Something about his attitude says to me he totally didn't expect to win. Just showed up in a "what the hell?" type fashion.

At least he's a good sport about it.
 
2012-02-27 04:05:07 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: I'm assuming the asinine tag is for the guy for not registering which takes, what, 5 minutes?


Yeah, and he won by 6 minutes. Shame.
 
2012-02-27 04:27:36 PM  

WinoRhino: It's their right to make the decision they did, and I applaud the guy for not making a fuss over it, but if he had a number and was officially timed, it really doesn't make too much of a difference. He didn't cheat in any way. I dunno, I think I'd still call him the winner even if I was the guy who came in second. Seriously, how does the "new winner" feel? Is he excited that he "won" the race without being the fastest guy in it?


He didn't have a number.

If you don't register, you are not in the race. If you are not in the race, you can not win.
 
2012-02-27 04:35:59 PM  

bacongood: WinoRhino: It's their right to make the decision they did, and I applaud the guy for not making a fuss over it, but if he had a number and was officially timed, it really doesn't make too much of a difference. He didn't cheat in any way. I dunno, I think I'd still call him the winner even if I was the guy who came in second. Seriously, how does the "new winner" feel? Is he excited that he "won" the race without being the fastest guy in it?

He didn't have a number.

If you don't register, you are not in the race. If you are not in the race, you can not win.



I followed the link in the article. Registration is $100.

Friend probably figured why waste $100, let friend run when he could. Scott figured whatever...he'll probably never win.

I would bet this was not some malicious attempt to sneak about the rules. Rather just someone using a bib that would have otherwise gone unused.
 
2012-02-27 04:41:01 PM  

bacongood: He didn't have a number.


Yes, he did. He used the number of a friend who could not make it to the event. That friend didn't use it. It was a valid entry. It had the wrong name assigned to it. That's a clerical issue, not an athletic issue. The entry fee was paid.
 
2012-02-27 04:43:54 PM  
I just want to know who jumps in to the spot of a friend and suddenly wins a marathon. Don't you have to train for that shiat?

"Hey, bob, you want to run a marathon next week? I can't make it"

"Sure, why not?"
 
2012-02-27 04:47:54 PM  

mrtoadswildride: Friend probably figured why waste $100, let friend run when he could. Scott figured whatever...he'll probably never win.


You don't run a 2:31 marathon by accident, though. That won't factor in a major race but the guy has to know that it gives you a good chance of placing in a smaller one. Very strange.
 
2012-02-27 04:53:46 PM  

bulldg4life: I just want to know who jumps in to the spot of a friend and suddenly wins a marathon. Don't you have to train for that shiat?

"Hey, bob, you want to run a marathon next week? I can't make it"

"Sure, why not?"


I've given numbers to friends, and it's nearly always someone I train with, etc. For example, New York is a lottery. I got in, my friend did not. He had family in the area, I transferred the number to him and I just did a local one that year.
 
2012-02-27 05:00:16 PM  

WinoRhino: bacongood: He didn't have a number.

Yes, he did. He used the number of a friend who could not make it to the event. That friend didn't use it. It was a valid entry. It had the wrong name assigned to it. That's a clerical issue, not an athletic issue. The entry fee was paid.


No.
The friend is the one who signed the waiver of liability.
The friend is the one who signs the agreement.

And if he took 5 minutes to do an internet search, he would know his time would put him in the top 5 in every race for the last several years. So it's his own damn fault.
 
2012-02-27 05:06:43 PM  

Komplex: WinoRhino: bacongood: He didn't have a number.

Yes, he did. He used the number of a friend who could not make it to the event. That friend didn't use it. It was a valid entry. It had the wrong name assigned to it. That's a clerical issue, not an athletic issue. The entry fee was paid.

No.
The friend is the one who signed the waiver of liability.
The friend is the one who signs the agreement.

And if he took 5 minutes to do an internet search, he would know his time would put him in the top 5 in every race for the last several years. So it's his own damn fault.


i288.photobucket.com

/hot
 
2012-02-27 05:13:19 PM  

mrtoadswildride:
I would bet this was not some malicious attempt to sneak about the rules. Rather just someone using a bib that would have otherwise gone unused.


Never said it was malicious; I have bandited a race or two before as well. But everyone knows that if you bandit, you don't take the medal. Not even the participation medal.

WinoRhino: bacongood: He didn't have a number.

Yes, he did. He used the number of a friend who could not make it to the event. That friend didn't use it. It was a valid entry. It had the wrong name assigned to it. That's a clerical issue, not an athletic issue. The entry fee was paid.


His friend had a number; he did not. A clerical issue is spelling a name wrong.
 
2012-02-27 05:37:56 PM  

bacongood: Never said it was malicious; I have bandited a race or two before as well. But everyone knows that if you bandit, you don't take the medal. Not even the participation medal.


I don't think there's anything wrong with taking the participation medal, assuming you're a "someone else's number" bandit and not someone who just hopped in. There's at least as many medals as numbers sold and there isn't much use for the ones that don't get handed out.

You obviously forfeit the prize, though.
 
2012-02-27 05:51:27 PM  
He won the race but lost the bureaucracy. To win the race he had to run 26.2 miles faster than everyone else and he did that.
 
2012-02-27 05:57:03 PM  

PluckYew: He won the race but lost the bureaucracy. To win the race he had to run 26.2 miles faster than everyone else and he did that.


So if I go out and run the exact same course tomorrow, faster than anybody, does that make me the winner of the race? According to you, I would be the winner.
 
2012-02-27 06:40:32 PM  

bangmaid: So if I go out and run the exact same course tomorrow, faster than anybody, does that make me the winner of the race? According to you, I would be the winner.


No, he didn't say that at all. Current weather conditions affect the outcome, as do other factors running against people (they might push your pace early, draft you, etc). He was exposed to all those the same as the other runners. He won the race, but was DQ'd for not using his own number. And again,I am not saying they were wrong for DQ'ing him. But using someone else's bib did not make him faster. Arguing that is illogical and silly. So is arguing the semantics that he "won" the race or not, by trying to define "win" as "was faster than everyone else and used a bib that he registered for himself."

Komplex: No.
The friend is the one who signed the waiver of liability.
The friend is the one who signs the agreement.


Who gives a shiat? He ran, he was the fastest. They can DQ him all they want. He was the fastest. Se the above point.

bacongood: Never said it was malicious; I have bandited a race or two before as well. But everyone knows that if you bandit, you don't take the medal. Not even the participation medal.


I kind of agree with this, but only because I wouldn't want an official runner to miss out on getting one. I ran Boston as a bandit 4 times, and once officially for a 5th and last time. I only took the medal on the official run (which, sadly, was my worst time of all 5. Go figure.)
 
2012-02-27 06:51:44 PM  

WinoRhino: bangmaid: So if I go out and run the exact same course tomorrow, faster than anybody, does that make me the winner of the race? According to you, I would be the winner.

No, he didn't say that at all. Current weather conditions affect the outcome, as do other factors running against people (they might push your pace early, draft you, etc). He was exposed to all those the same as the other runners. He won the race, but was DQ'd for not using his own number. And again,I am not saying they were wrong for DQ'ing him. But using someone else's bib did not make him faster. Arguing that is illogical and silly. So is arguing the semantics that he "won" the race or not, by trying to define "win" as "was faster than everyone else and used a bib that he registered for himself."

Komplex: No.
The friend is the one who signed the waiver of liability.
The friend is the one who signs the agreement.

Who gives a shiat? He ran, he was the fastest. They can DQ him all they want. He was the fastest. Se the above point.

bacongood: Never said it was malicious; I have bandited a race or two before as well. But everyone knows that if you bandit, you don't take the medal. Not even the participation medal.

I kind of agree with this, but only because I wouldn't want an official runner to miss out on getting one. I ran Boston as a bandit 4 times, and once officially for a 5th and last time. I only took the medal on the official run (which, sadly, was my worst time of all 5. Go figure.)


He claimed that simply running the fastest means you win the race, not taking into account that you must sign a contract to be a valid participant. This guy (and other "bandits") are not part of the race. Doesn't matter if his friend bought a bib and signed the TOS. This "winner" did not. Same thing as running the course the day after.

As for you and your "bandit" races, fark you. When you qualify and pay the legit way and spend the first 3 miles walking because it's too crowded, the experience is ruined by the masses (yes, more people than just you) that cheat the system.
 
2012-02-27 07:02:02 PM  

bangmaid: As for you and your "bandit" races, fark you. When you qualify and pay the legit way and spend the first 3 miles walking because it's too crowded, the experience is ruined by the masses (yes, more people than just you) that cheat the system.


whywerunn.files.wordpress.com

U mad bro?
 
2012-02-27 08:38:09 PM  
Rosie Ruiz says, "Oh no he din't!!"



/originally typed "Rosie Perez"
//really drunk
 
2012-02-27 09:25:12 PM  

serial_crusher: Peter von Nostrand: I'm assuming the asinine tag is for the guy for not registering which takes, what, 5 minutes?

Yeah this. I mostly do trail runs, and the RDs are usually more laid back, but you'd still usually have to ask before the race if you were going to trade registrations with somebody else.


I don't think he cared. It was probably a last minute thing, he took his buddie's number and happened to win. Meh. I don't think he was upset by it, and understood.
 
2012-02-27 11:04:07 PM  

WinoRhino: bulldg4life: I just want to know who jumps in to the spot of a friend and suddenly wins a marathon. Don't you have to train for that shiat?

"Hey, bob, you want to run a marathon next week? I can't make it"

"Sure, why not?"

I've given numbers to friends, and it's nearly always someone I train with, etc. For example, New York is a lottery. I got in, my friend did not. He had family in the area, I transferred the number to him and I just did a local one that year.


I call shenanigans.

NYRR will not allow you to transfer your marathon bib and if you get caught using someone else's bib both giver and receiver are banned from all future NYRR events.
 
2012-02-28 12:29:59 AM  
Eh, so what? It gave the guy a chance to train and had support people there for free. I doubt he was really concerned about not getting some ribbon. For him it was water stations and free goo packs.

So what if he won. Running against a bunch of Texas 'tards wearing cowboy hats and boots/ I'm surprised he only won by 6 minutes against the mid-west heifers.

No news here.
 
2012-02-28 06:57:52 AM  

Joshudan: I call shenanigans.


Call it all you want, but we did.
 
2012-02-28 09:49:00 AM  

Joshudan: WinoRhino: bulldg4life: I just want to know who jumps in to the spot of a friend and suddenly wins a marathon. Don't you have to train for that shiat?

"Hey, bob, you want to run a marathon next week? I can't make it"

"Sure, why not?"

I've given numbers to friends, and it's nearly always someone I train with, etc. For example, New York is a lottery. I got in, my friend did not. He had family in the area, I transferred the number to him and I just did a local one that year.

I call shenanigans.

NYRR will not allow you to transfer your marathon bib and if you get caught using someone else's bib both giver and receiver are banned from all future NYRR events.


I am not positive about NY's rule, but several races have realized there is money to be had by allowing bib selling. The old rule was to take a 20k runner race and sell 30k spots, because only 2/3 would actually run. If you allowed bib swapping, there would be too many people on the course so they cracked down on bandits. Now, some are selling 25k spots, and authorizing swapping for a fee. So they get almost as much money, but less risk that the course will be crowded.

Personally, I will bandit some races. But if the race is unique in some way (you have to qualify like Boston, special location like Chicago's Soldier Field 10 miler, etc.), I won't. But that 5k that uses the most common paths in a park... half the time I accidently run into the pack and just go with it as a 3 mile tempo. I've also jumped a couple halfs to pace friends.
 
2012-02-28 03:42:15 PM  

bacongood: Joshudan: WinoRhino: bulldg4life: I just want to know who jumps in to the spot of a friend and suddenly wins a marathon. Don't you have to train for that shiat?

"Hey, bob, you want to run a marathon next week? I can't make it"

"Sure, why not?"

I've given numbers to friends, and it's nearly always someone I train with, etc. For example, New York is a lottery. I got in, my friend did not. He had family in the area, I transferred the number to him and I just did a local one that year.

I call shenanigans.

NYRR will not allow you to transfer your marathon bib and if you get caught using someone else's bib both giver and receiver are banned from all future NYRR events.

I am not positive about NY's rule, but several races have realized there is money to be had by allowing bib selling. The old rule was to take a 20k runner race and sell 30k spots, because only 2/3 would actually run. If you allowed bib swapping, there would be too many people on the course so they cracked down on bandits. Now, some are selling 25k spots, and authorizing swapping for a fee. So they get almost as much money, but less risk that the course will be crowded.

Personally, I will bandit some races. But if the race is unique in some way (you have to qualify like Boston, special location like Chicago's Soldier Field 10 miler, etc.), I won't. But that 5k that uses the most common paths in a park... half the time I accidently run into the pack and just go with it as a 3 mile tempo. I've also jumped a couple halfs to pace friends.


Totally agree with you. Play by the rules on the big name races but sneaking in with an old bib to be with friends is cool and unless you try to cross the finish field judges won't care. Heck, my 9-year old daughter ran the last mile of last year's ING NY with me. Of course she got pulled off 100 yards before the finish and I had to go pick her up after collecting my stuff. My wife wasn't happy and I knew I shouldn't have done it, but sometimes things happen when you've run 25 miles in a row.

But running a marathon and winning with someone else's bib is silly and IMO rude. If you get caught doing it you should pay the price like this guy, who happens to be PDQ so I'm sure he can win a medal or two with his own bib.
 
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