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(BBC)   The myth of the eight-hour sleep   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 150
    More: Interesting, Western society, industrial revolution, sleep disorders, Don Quixote, value-systems, reformation, In Time, sleep  
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26527 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Feb 2012 at 3:15 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-23 09:33:05 AM
I set my scheduel to Centaurian time. It's a 36 hour day.You guys should try it. Give it a few weeks, and you'll get used to it. Or have a psychotic episode.
 
2012-02-23 09:57:09 AM

MythDragon: Fail in Human Form: That actually really good advice. I would add get some type of white noise generator and try to focus on the ambient sound. Eventually you'll just drift off without even noticing it.

I always have a portable fan going in my room (in winter, I just point it away from me). The white noise drowns out all the other noises that would otherwise irritate me, be it cars going by, roommate watching TV downstairs, dog scrapping around in her crate, squirrels running across the roof, or whatever. Downside to that is I have a REALLY hard time getting to sleep if I don't have a fan avaliable. When I go to a hotel, I have to set the AC to max to that it stays on.


Please be careful with the fan. If you don't open a window, you may die from fan death.
 
2012-02-23 10:02:13 AM

jaylectricity: Well first off, you don't want 8 hours. You want 7.5 or 9 hours. You want to wake up right at the end of a 90 minute REM cycle. If you wake up after exactly 8 hours you're going to feel a bit groggy for a bit. Now, if you go to bed at 10PM and fall asleep sometime in the next half hour, you'll probably wake up close to 6AM on your own. If you miss your window, try to fall asleep 4.5 hours before you need to wake up. If you wake up within an hour of when you need to wake up, you might as well just get up. Falling back asleep will mess you up because you'll wake up during your deepest sleep.

Secondly, if you're having a hard time sleeping, just lay as still as you can. Don't worry about the fact that you're not asleep. Just think about whatever it is you feel like thinking about, even if it's about what you need to do the next day. Just lie still and keep your eyes closed as much as possible. If you feel the urge to urinate, get up and walk slowly to the bathroom. Don't turn the light on and sit down to pee. Do not get frustrated at your lack of sleep. Just go back to your bed and lie still. You'll probably fall asleep for a short time anyway.

The key is to not worry about if you're sleeping. Get your body the rest it needs. Your mind will rest as well UNLESS you worry about the fact that you're not sleeping. When you get up in the morning you might not be fully refreshed, but you'll feel a lot better than if you worried all night, got mad at yourself, tried to force yourself to sleep, or if you woke up to do a few shots of bourbon at 4 in the morning.


The waking up at the end of a REM cycle may not be true. I just recently watched a NOVA special on dreams and there was a study mentioned in it where they monitored test subjects brainwaves during sleep and periodically woke them up during REM sleep and then during deep sleep. After waking, they had the subject do word association tests. Basically they gave a few letters of a word and asked the subject to fill in the rest. What they found was that the connotation of words chosen by subjects woken in REM sleep was more likely to be negative when compared to subjects woken during the deep sleep phase (e.g., HO_ for someone woken in REM sleep would likely be something such as HOSTILE whereas someone woken during deep sleep phase would be more likely to choose a word such as HOPE). I forget their exact conclusion, but basically you ensure you are in a crap mood when you wake up by waking up during your REM phase.
 
2012-02-23 10:02:19 AM
Sometimes I run on about four hours of sleep and I'm fine. Sometimes I am actually tired and I'll crash for twenty hours straight. Just kinda depends.
 
2012-02-23 10:12:51 AM
I don't even get 8 hours when I am too drunk to stand
 
2012-02-23 10:18:33 AM

miss diminutive: What I've always wondered is: is our 8 hour sleep schedule is based on the fact that humans evolved near the equator where the nights remain essentially the same length? What if the earth formed differently so that one revolution took 72 hours, would we still sleep for 1/3 of a day like we do now?


I've often wondered this myself, If we had to relocate to another planet That took a week to rotate, would we ultimately adjust or would we have to sleep 7 times per revolution?.........inquiring minds need to know this shiat.
 
2012-02-23 10:18:50 AM
with my prostrate, i'm lucky to get 4 hours straight.
 
2012-02-23 10:20:49 AM
Lifelong chronic insomniac. I often go through days (and nights) where I don't sleep at all.

/Spent time in the university sleep lab.
//Normison no longer has any effect.
///I envy you deep sleepers.
 
2012-02-23 10:22:39 AM

Tanukis_Parachute: with my prostrate, i'm lucky to get 4 hours straight.


Perhaps you should try lying down instead.
 
2012-02-23 10:28:47 AM
My roomate can slep 18-20 hours a day waking up to pee and get a snack. I will leave for work in the morning she is passed out on the couch . get home from work still there, Ill go to bed, still there.

Myself I am sleeping "normal" for the past few years. About 7 years ago I got in a real bad car accident coming home from work. If I did sleep I had the worst nightmares ever and would wake up screaming. Lost weight got even paler. I was a hot mess. It took years for me to actually get a good night sleep. Its great to be mostly normal now.
 
2012-02-23 10:31:40 AM

foxyshadis: ArcadianRefugee: jaylectricity: Well first off, you don't want 8 hours. You want 7.5 or 9 hours. You want to wake up right at the end of a 90 minute REM cycle. If you wake up after exactly 8 hours you're going to feel a bit groggy for a bit.

1) Go ahead and invent an alarm clock that reads body functions so it knows when you enter/exit REM, then wakes you accordingly (though obviously not later than you wish to be woken).
2) Profit.
3) Remember who gave you the idea.

Someone already has:
ecx.images-amazon.com
Philips Wake-up Light

Hot damn it's expensive, though.

I've also seen "binaural beats" that induce lucid dreaming and purport to wake you up completely refreshed at the end of the session.




Recommended by National Sleep Foundation

I would like to join this organization.


/zzzzzzzzzzz....
 
2012-02-23 10:33:28 AM

foxyshadis: I've also seen "binaural beats" that induce lucid dreaming and purport to wake you up completely refreshed at the end of the session.


I'm a big fan of binaural/brainwave music, but they function best as a sleeping med enhancer (never had any luck falling asleep just listening to that music on its own.) Brainwave Suite (esp. the Theta wave CD) is my go-to for general meditation coupled with vivid dreaming. I've used a few subliminal brainwave mp3s (like this one) to help with deeper sleep. Although I'm a bit suspicious of subliminal messages in music, I'm reasonably certain it's not turning me into a Manchurian candidate.

My insomnia is so chronic, I will do almost anything to get a good night's sleep. So far, Lunesta + ear plugs + sleep mask = about 5 hours of actual sleep.
 
2012-02-23 10:44:48 AM
This article was a revelation for me; I probably wake up in the middle of the night once or twice a week around 4am. On days where I have to wake up at 6:15 for work, I feel pretty tired, on other days when I can wake up when I want I just naturally get up between 8-10. I never really worried about it, but it makes sense now. When I am training hard (long-distance running), however, my sleep is completely different. I sleep straight through the night, often for 10-12 hours, but if I don't spend that time sleeping I'll get hurt/sick pretty quick. The worst were 5:30pm speed workouts, get home around 8, eat dinner, then lie in bed trying to get my mind to shut down with images of trails flying through my brain while feeling paranoid that if I don't get to sleep soon all that training will go to waste when I get a cold. I think I read somewhere that Tour de France riders can't really sleep during the race because they are so wired from the hours of constant alertness on the road - I can definitely believe that. And the night before a race, I'll be lucky to get any sleep at all. Can't even imagine going through that for three weeks in a row, or during the RAAM, love this book Link (new window)
 
2012-02-23 10:49:01 AM
I can fall to sleep very easily now because I learned years ago to develop a habit that basically tells my body that it's time to start sleeping. I start reading a book and usually after four or five pages, the words stop making sense. If I find myself having to backtrack, I know I'm ready to sleep. Put the book away, turn out the light and usually I'm asleep within seconds. My wife at the time hated how I could do that so easily, sometimes without reading.

If I do wake up, I usually just look at the time and fall alseep again a few seconds later. Then, the dreams start kicking in. I'll fall asleep and start dreaming immediately. I'll wake up for a few seconds and then repeat the cycle multiple times until I finally have to get up in the morning. It can be frustrating when the dream cycles get disrupted (my cat will sometimes reach out with her paw and play with my bottom lip if she wants attention while I'm sleeping) because I feel like I've been doing some heavy duty processing.

I'm only had three or four nights of solid sleep (go to bed at whatever time and wake up 8 hours or so later) in my entire life. When that has happened, I woke up immediately and was perfectly rested. That's an interesting feeling because I closed my eyes and then opened them what appears to be a split-second later only to see that it's morning.
 
2012-02-23 10:51:30 AM

SJKebab: foxyshadis: Someone already has:

Philips Wake-up Light

That just looks like a gradual wake up light. I keep my blinds open to get that effect.

chrylis: There's an interesting little gadget called the Zeo

Now we're talking. Thanks for the tip.


But leaving the blinds open will be pointless in winter, as it's still dark when I leave for work, and in summer would result in waking up at 5AM.
 
2012-02-23 10:53:23 AM
I wish I could remember what it is like to be fully rested. Been working rotating shifts for 8 years now. Love my job, but damn it is tough sometimes.

I can definitely vouch for the 'FFS, do not wake up during the wrong part of the sleep cycle.' Sleep inertia is one of the most physically and psychologically uncomfortable experiences you can have.
 
2012-02-23 11:05:56 AM
I have the Philips wake-up light since I live in (my mom's) basement and it's dark.

It works pretty good, but if you are still tired in the morning it's really easy to fall back asleep regardless.

It really is all about the timing. Jayelectricity is absolutely correct, you need to wake up during the lightest REM cycle. So for most people that is 7.5, or 9 hours of sleep. It is hard to judge when you actually fall asleep though. I'm guessing 15 minutes or so for many people. So if I have to be up at 8 I get into bed around either 10:45 or 12:15 depending on how sleepy I feel.

Another trick is to never, ever read your iPhone or tablet in bed, or go directly from your PC's glowing LCD screen to bed. It's like your eyes have been staring at the sun. Give yourself 30 to 60 minutes of NO electronic crap before retiring for the night.

Actually some sleep docs say don't even read in bed because of the light...although for some people reading in bed does make them very sleepy. Not me: if I start reading something good like fiction I'll end up staying up until 3:30 am and it will cause my mind to race.

Beds (bedrooms) should be for sleep and sex only, according to some sleep experts.

And if you have to get up to take a piss in the middle of the night, don't turn on any lights, or if you have to turn them on keep your eyes slitted. Just be careful and don't piss all over the floor or stub your toe on furniture or walk right into a wall (done that).

And stay away from meth, coke and LSD.
 
2012-02-23 11:06:21 AM

RexTalionis: Try valerian root extract.


If that doesn't work, try a shark cartilage enema.
 
2012-02-23 11:06:33 AM

TopNotched: miss diminutive: What I've always wondered is: is our 8 hour sleep schedule is based on the fact that humans evolved near the equator where the nights remain essentially the same length? What if the earth formed differently so that one revolution took 72 hours, would we still sleep for 1/3 of a day like we do now?

I've often wondered this myself, If we had to relocate to another planet That took a week to rotate, would we ultimately adjust or would we have to sleep 7 times per revolution?.........inquiring minds need to know this shiat.


I'm glad I'm not the only one with questions like this rattling around their brain.
 
2012-02-23 11:15:41 AM
Well five hours a night is all i need ... except when I go on a bender ... I really don't know what happens when that happens ...
 
2012-02-23 11:26:12 AM
Hmm, interesting. I used to do this almost every night when I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in rural western Kenya. My house had no electricity (nor did the community of ~20,000 I lived in) so I would go to bed a few hours after dark, sleep 'til about midnight, wake up and read or write letters for a few hours (by lamp light), then go back to bed and sleep 'til sunrise. I lived right on the equator so the daytime varied only about 15 minutes year 'round...12 hours of daytime and 12 of night. I didn't do this while visiting friends with electricity or while staying in Nairobi...just at home. And of course, that ended when I returned to the States.
 
2012-02-23 11:58:52 AM

miss diminutive: TopNotched: miss diminutive: What I've always wondered is: is our 8 hour sleep schedule is based on the fact that humans evolved near the equator where the nights remain essentially the same length? What if the earth formed differently so that one revolution took 72 hours, would we still sleep for 1/3 of a day like we do now?

I've often wondered this myself, If we had to relocate to another planet That took a week to rotate, would we ultimately adjust or would we have to sleep 7 times per revolution?.........inquiring minds need to know this shiat.

I'm glad I'm not the only one with questions like this rattling around their brain.


I've read that people sleep a lot less during the summer when they're near the poles and have a lot more daylight. I talked to someone who was stationed in Iceland with the air force and he said that during the summer, the sun would barely dip below the horizon for a half hour before coming back up and people tended to sleep a lot less as a result. I imagine that there's a limit to how much the body can adjust though. On a planet with a 160 hour rotation, you probably have to sleep a couple of times a day at least. And of course it would probably take hundreds of years, if not more, for a change that significant to come into play.
 
2012-02-23 12:08:58 PM
fark. I used to sleep in two shifts like that. Once from 4 pm to about 8 pm and then from 1 am to 5 or 6 am and I have never been that well rested in my life.

I want to go back to that.
 
2012-02-23 12:21:51 PM
Protip: Blackout curtains have improved my sleep cycles GREATLY.
 
2012-02-23 12:35:14 PM

Summer Glau's Love Slave: Lifelong chronic insomniac. I often go through days (and nights) where I don't sleep at all.

/Spent time in the university sleep lab.
//Normison no longer has any effect.
///I envy you deep sleepers.


Ritalin has been my miracle drug. I never slept before. I do now.

Check out www.totallyadd.com

I never suspected it until I saw the 90 minute Canadian PBS.
 
2012-02-23 01:25:22 PM
As the father of a 3 week old baby, I too agree that 8 hours of consecutive sleep is a myth.
 
2012-02-23 01:25:50 PM

miss diminutive: The article was an interesting read, I've often wondered what our human ancestors did for countless generations when there was essentially no light after sundown. Their world must have just essentially shut down. Although on the bright side, there wouldn't have been any light pollution so the view of the stars must have been breathtaking.


I lived in a pre-electricity city in Yemen in the early 1960s, elevation 4800 feet in the mountains, and the night sky was unbelievable. Milky Way splashed across the night star was so gorgeous, and the light from a full moon was bright enough to read a book.

We had to make our own entertainment, though. No phone, no TV, could only listen to the record player when my Dad fired up the diesel generator, and the shortwave radio ran on batteries.
 
2012-02-23 01:27:49 PM
Physical exercise. If you have used your useless body at all during the day in any type of intensive exercise you won't have a choice about going to sleep or staying up or whatever. You will just become tired. People didn't have sleep problems back in olden times because they actually did something and they weren't hyper-stimulating their brains until 3am. During the day they used their bodies and during the night they just sat around drinking and talking and slowed down until it was time to sleep. If you use your body it will force you to go to sleep.
 
2012-02-23 01:55:35 PM

Barry McCackiner: Physical exercise. If you have used your useless body at all during the day in any type of intensive exercise you won't have a choice about going to sleep or staying up or whatever. You will just become tired. People didn't have sleep problems back in olden times because they actually did something and they weren't hyper-stimulating their brains until 3am. During the day they used their bodies and during the night they just sat around drinking and talking and slowed down until it was time to sleep. If you use your body it will force you to go to sleep.


That's not necessarily true. At the time I was in Kenya I was a low-ranking international class 10k and marathon runner, putting in about 20 miles a day of road work as well as teaching high school full time. Mere exercise is not enough.
 
2012-02-23 02:05:01 PM
WOW
just WOW

as someone who has had sleep problems for the last 50 years, this article blew me away.
I used to think that something WAS wrong when I woke up and read for a few hours and went back to sleep!!!
BWahahahahahahahah now I will just embrace the time.

1) if you SNORE and have not had a sleep study, get one now and find out if you have sleep apnea. Dont wait! (record yourself with your laptop all night. infrared cameras FTW)

2) if you have sleep apnea and cant use a CPAC, get a sleep apnea mouth piece. you will thank me later.

3) I used to have MASSIVE problems falling asleep. some was related to the sleep apnea, some was related to untreated/undertreated hypothyroidism. once that was fixed, I never had trouble falling asleep again. Don't trust your doctor. GET THE ACTUAL TSH number and research WTF IT MEANS!!!! Sub-clinical hypothyroidism is killing people slowly and they dont even know it.

/CSB
 
2012-02-23 02:10:35 PM

Stone Meadow: Barry McCackiner: Physical exercise. If you have used your useless body at all during the day in any type of intensive exercise you won't have a choice about going to sleep or staying up or whatever. You will just become tired. People didn't have sleep problems back in olden times because they actually did something and they weren't hyper-stimulating their brains until 3am. During the day they used their bodies and during the night they just sat around drinking and talking and slowed down until it was time to sleep. If you use your body it will force you to go to sleep.

That's not necessarily true. At the time I was in Kenya I was a low-ranking international class 10k and marathon runner, putting in about 20 miles a day of road work as well as teaching high school full time. Mere exercise is not enough.


THIS THIS and MORE THIS.
I love when tards who were able to fix their trivial sleep problem assume that everyone else is probably being affected by the same problem.
I really love when tards with minor or trivial sleep problems (once a week, once a month) suggest you try BLANK.
For the love of god, dont you think we have literally tried EVERYTHING??????
bwhahahaahah

FFS, gone have to start punching people who suggest valerian root or tylenol PM.
If the easy stuff worked, we wouldnt have sleep problems!!!

/so happy that I have most/all of my sleep problems under control and actually wake up RESTED (or mostly rested)!! YAY
/if you have sleep problems and havent been to a sleep CLINIC (rather than your doctor), get to one as soon as you can. A team of specialists is infinitely better than "have you tried BLANK". We actually work on 3-5 fronts at one time, along with keeping a detailed sleep journal/day journal. TADA.
/or you can take valerian root and solve EVERYTHING!!! :D
 
2012-02-23 02:10:42 PM

Jgok: Fail in Human Form: I would add get some type of white noise generator and try to focus on the ambient sound. Eventually you'll just drift off without even noticing it.

But that doesn't help when THE RINGING IN YOUR EARS is loud enough to drown out anything short of a jet engine :p

/ok, maybe that was an exaggeration
//but it certainly feels like that right now...


I feel your pain on that one. I've always had a little ringing in both ears, but I had an ear infection the last weekend and now I have this constant high pitch squeal in my left ear. It's driving me nuts.

/At least the side if my head stopped aching
 
2012-02-23 02:16:25 PM

MythDragon: Fail in Human Form: That actually really good advice. I would add get some type of white noise generator and try to focus on the ambient sound. Eventually you'll just drift off without even noticing it.

I always have a portable fan going in my room (in winter, I just point it away from me). The white noise drowns out all the other noises that would otherwise irritate me, be it cars going by, roommate watching TV downstairs, dog scrapping around in her crate, squirrels running across the roof, or whatever. Downside to that is I have a REALLY hard time getting to sleep if I don't have a fan avaliable. When I go to a hotel, I have to set the AC to max to that it stays on.


I use an app on my iPad as my alarm clock/white noise generator called White Noise Pro. It has a mix pad setting that allows me to mix 3 different sounds and it creates a faux 3d effect that makes the sounds seem to move around which helps it from becoming monotonous. Works like a charm.
 
2012-02-23 02:24:37 PM
A few things:
Read a really great book called "The Head Trip". It's all about the different states of consciousness. He has a whole chapter on "The Watch" as it was known to some cultures. The hypnogogic state going into The Watch combined with it's body paralysis/numbness is what gave rise to many of the legends we have of Succubus/Incubus, faeries, and the like.

Sleep apnea. I recently lost about 60 pounds. My snoring has all but ceased. Weight loss is the number one way to fix your snoring issues. Trust me. (It also improved my erectile function).

The way I lost weight may have had something to do with my sleep difficulties being mostly corrected. I used the HCG protocol. Not only will it make you lose mad amounts of fat, it actually resets your thyroid and clears up hypothyroidism.
 
2012-02-23 03:04:30 PM
typically i get 3 to 4 hours a night have have been like that since i was 8 or 9. that was 32 years ago.
 
2012-02-23 04:32:54 PM

Stone Meadow: Barry McCackiner: Physical exercise. If you have used your useless body at all during the day in any type of intensive exercise you won't have a choice about going to sleep or staying up or whatever. You will just become tired. People didn't have sleep problems back in olden times because they actually did something and they weren't hyper-stimulating their brains until 3am. During the day they used their bodies and during the night they just sat around drinking and talking and slowed down until it was time to sleep. If you use your body it will force you to go to sleep.

That's not necessarily true. At the time I was in Kenya I was a low-ranking international class 10k and marathon runner, putting in about 20 miles a day of road work as well as teaching high school full time. Mere exercise is not enough.


Alright I admit I have never had a serious sleep problem. I guess I can't relate.

/sleeps like a baby
 
2012-02-23 04:58:47 PM

Barry McCackiner:

Alright I admit I have never had a serious sleep problem. I guess I can't relate.

/sleeps like a baby


...crying at the top of your lungs every two hours because you're lying in a pile of your own crap?

That doesn't sound very restful.
 
2012-02-23 05:08:04 PM

socodog: The way I lost weight may have had something to do with my sleep difficulties being mostly corrected. I used the HCG protocol. Not only will it make you lose mad amounts of fat, it actually resets your thyroid and clears up hypothyroidism.


which one? the questionable one or the fraudulent one??

Weight loss
A controversial usage of hCG is as an adjunct to the British endocrinologist Albert T. W. Simeons' ultra-low-calorie weight-loss diet (less than 500 calories). Simeons, while studying pregnant women in India on a calorie-deficient diet, and "fat boys" with pituitary problems (Frölich's syndrome) treated with low-dose hCG, claimed that both lost fat rather than lean (muscle) tissue. He reasoned that hCG must be programming the hypothalamus to do this in the former cases in order to protect the developing fetus by promoting mobilization and consumption of abnormal, excessive adipose deposits. Simeons later published a book entitled Pounds and Inches, designed to combat obesity.[20] Simeons, practicing at Salvator Mundi International Hospital in Rome, Italy, recommended low-dose daily hCG injections (125 IU) in combination with a customized ultra-low-calorie (500 cal/day, high-protein, low-carbohydrate/fat) diet loss of adipose tissue without loss of lean tissue. After Simeons' death, the diet started to spread to specialized centers and via popularization by individuals, such as the controversial author Kevin Trudeau, famous for promotion of alternative therapies and treatments.
The controversy proceeds from warnings by the Journal of the American Medical Association and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition[21] that hCG is neither safe nor effective as a weight-loss aid.[22]
A meta analysis found that studies supporting hCG for weight loss were of poor methodological quality and concluded that "there is no scientific evidence that HCG is effective in the treatment of obesity; it does not bring about weight-loss or fat-redistribution, nor does it reduce hunger or induce a feeling of well-being".[23]
[edit]Homeopathic hCG for weight control
Controversy about, and shortages[24] of, injected hCG for weight loss have led to substantial Internet promotion of "homeopathic hCG" for weight control. The ingredients in these products are often obscure, but if prepared from true hCG via homeopathic dilution, they contain either no hCG at all or only trace amounts (according to the principles of homeopathy this remedy would in any case cure anorexia, not obesity).
The United States Food and Drug Administration has stated that this drug is fraudulent and ineffective for weight loss. It is also not protected as a homeopathic drug and has been deemed an illegal substance.[25][26]
The weight loss indicated by individuals on an "hCG diet" can be attributed entirely to the fact that such diets prescribe a consumption rate of 500-550 calorie per day, or approximately one quarter of what is commonly accepted as the daily recommended value for a male adult of average build and activity. Further, double-blind studies[citation needed] note no decrease in appetite by those taking hCG versus individuals on placebos and have offered no evidence that individuals taking hCG are more likely to lose fat than lean tissue. Long-term results caution that unlike individuals participating in a diet of, for example, 1100 calories per day, those on a 500 calorie per day diet are unlikely to develop more appropriate eating habits and will gain weight more quickly after the diet has completed.[citation needed]
 
2012-02-23 05:09:27 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Barry McCackiner:

Alright I admit I have never had a serious sleep problem. I guess I can't relate.

/sleeps like a baby

...crying at the top of your lungs every two hours because you're lying in a pile of your own crap?

That doesn't sound very restful.


depends
 
2012-02-23 06:53:09 PM

namatad: FirstNationalBastard: Barry McCackiner:

Alright I admit I have never had a serious sleep problem. I guess I can't relate.

/sleeps like a baby

...crying at the top of your lungs every two hours because you're lying in a pile of your own crap?

That doesn't sound very restful.

depends


No I just sleep on a hammock and then I setup a bedpan underneath me. Depends are too restrictive.
 
2012-02-23 07:05:34 PM

namatad: A meta analysis found that studies supporting hCG for weight loss were of poor methodological quality and concluded that "there is no scientific evidence that HCG is effective in the treatment of obesity; it does not bring about weight-loss or fat-redistribution, nor does it reduce hunger or induce a feeling of well-being".[23]


If you read the actual studies none of them actually followed the protocol. They arbitrarily decided that certain aspects were wrong/unhealthy so they modified them. Not saying hCG does or doesn't work, but the studies that "prove" it doesn't don't pass muster either.
 
2012-02-23 07:42:20 PM

SharkTrager: namatad: A meta analysis found that studies supporting hCG for weight loss were of poor methodological quality and concluded that "there is no scientific evidence that HCG is effective in the treatment of obesity; it does not bring about weight-loss or fat-redistribution, nor does it reduce hunger or induce a feeling of well-being".[23]

If you read the actual studies none of them actually followed the protocol. They arbitrarily decided that certain aspects were wrong/unhealthy so they modified them. Not saying hCG does or doesn't work, but the studies that "prove" it doesn't don't pass muster either.


LOL
well I certainly am never going to read the studies.
but then again, science is about reproducibility. So unless someone has actually produced a study which is scientific/peer reviewed/blah blah blah, we are still just talking about snake oil.
 
2012-02-23 07:53:03 PM
And how does the Alzie data correlate?
 
2012-02-23 10:11:44 PM
I did not use the homeopathic "hcg". There's no such thing.
I used the injectable type under the care of a physician. I can tell you this: it works just like Simeons said.
 
2012-02-24 01:21:19 AM
Don't be afraid to ask a doctor for Ambien. I take the 12.5 mg controlled release when I need something a little extra to help me sleep. One or maybe even two will knock you on your ass and you'll sleep like the dead. Just whatever you do.....DO NOT DRINK ON AMBIEN!

If you're gunshy about asking your doctor for Ambien, weed also can help a lot. Alcohol will put you out, but it's honestly a real shiatty quality of sleep and not worth it. The OTC sleeping pills are garbage and honestly make me feel groggy in the morning.

My shrink told me as long as you don't abuse it (I don't get how people start tripping out on it. Maybe I'm getting the wrong stuff), Ambien's a good way to manage insomnia. Worked for me.
 
2012-02-24 04:18:02 AM
 
2012-02-24 07:15:38 AM
I just wish that the motherfarker at our local Sleep Disorder Clinic would stop calling me on the phone at 2:00 or 3:00 a.m. asking me how I'm coping with my insomnia.
 
2012-02-24 11:18:47 AM

Grables'Daughter: Candygram4Mongo: This is true, and why many of my TFD posts take place between 2AM and 4AM.

The real purpose for tablet computing -- insomniac threadjacking...

I get insomnia about once or twice a month.

And I also spend the whole night partying - usually when I go out to the strip club (as a customer) and pass out for 12-14 hours.


Why you do this to us? The images, GD, they are in my head and they won't go away.

/pictures other things without success
 
2012-02-24 01:50:55 PM
true story. I read this story yesterday. went to bed tonight at 1. woke up at 5, couldn't get back to sleep till 6:30ish, woke up at 10.
 
2012-02-26 01:58:41 AM

mikefinch: jaylectricity: Secondly, if you're having a hard time sleeping, just lay as still as you can. Don't worry about the fact that you're not asleep. Just think about whatever it is you feel like thinking about, even if it's about what you need to do the next day. Just lie still and keep your eyes closed as much as possible. If you feel the urge to urinate, get up and walk slowly to the bathroom. Don't turn the light on and sit down to pee. Do not get frustrated at your lack of sleep. Just go back to your bed and lie still. You'll probably fall asleep for a short time anyway.

... For me this is like telling someone with chronic depression to just " cheer up".



I see what you're saying, but it's not the same. I'm not telling an insomniac to just relax and fall asleep. As far as your analogy goes, it would be more like me saying, "You're gonna feel sad, lot's of people got rich from feeling sad. Some of the funniest people in the world are also the saddest. Just accept it, and live your life accordingly."
 
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