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(Hot Air)   UK: Hey everyone, we are starting to privatize our Health Care system to make it more like the USA, this government thing doesn't seem to work very well   (hotair.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Reagan White House, Tory MPs, Donald Berwick, American health care, Andrew Lansley, American Conservative Union, TheDC, USA  
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3887 clicks; posted to Politics » on 19 Feb 2012 at 8:51 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-19 10:51:03 PM  

badhatharry: Flint Ironstag: elchip: . It is still free to the patient.

So some doctors are not government employees. They just get paid by the government.


Most doctors are employed directly by the NHS. It's only when you get to be a consultant that you "consult" for the NHS but work mainly in your own practice. And many "NHS Staff" are now actually employed by the private company that runs the hospital for the NHS rather than being employed directly by the NHS.
 
2012-02-19 10:55:04 PM  
It's always funny watching people who have never left their birth city try to expound at length about the experiences of people in other countries.
 
2012-02-19 10:56:06 PM  

tenpoundsofcheese: We should find out why Mexico is doing such a good job and copy their healthcare system. Healthcare costs about 1/9th of the US and a life expectancy only 3 years lower!


Maybe the sad truth is that for many recent advancements, we haven't seen much of a payoff in life expectancy. i.e., we've spent $200 billion on cancer research in the last 40 years; the death rate from cancer has dropped only 5 percent since 1950.
 
2012-02-19 10:58:02 PM  

elchip: Bungles: Only last month I had my knee scanned and strapped by a non-NHS doctor, in a private hospital, in London. HOW COULD THIS BE! HAVE I SLIPPED INTO A PARALLEL UNIVERSE?

Sorry, most hospitals are NHS-run and doctors and nurses in NHS-run hospitals are government employees.

It's my understanding that you have to get supplemental private insurance to get private hospital care covered, do you not?



Yup, anyone can get private insurance (which can be supplemental services or accommodation, or essentially entirely replace NHS - even though you're still covered by the NHS if you need it) - it's a fraction of the cost of the US equivalent, else they'd have literally zero customers. The fact that the vast majority still choose to be sole NHS patients shows how people actually act in a free market. They prefer the care/cost of the NHS.

There's no-one stopping people from getting private care, and virtually anyone in employment could afford some sort of cover. Yet the vast majority don't, even the very richest.

Would that really be the case if the NHS was like some sort of 19C Calcutta hole, like Fox likes to suggest?
 
2012-02-19 11:00:54 PM  

elchip: Bungles: Only last month I had my knee scanned and strapped by a non-NHS doctor, in a private hospital, in London. HOW COULD THIS BE! HAVE I SLIPPED INTO A PARALLEL UNIVERSE?

Sorry, most hospitals are NHS-run and doctors and nurses in NHS-run hospitals are government employees.

It's my understanding that you have to get supplemental private insurance to get private hospital care covered, do you not?


You can just pay out of pocket if you want. Or in some cases the NHS will pay for the private treatment if there is a wait or they have better facilities for some special cases. As I said before I don't know anyone who has had to do that so I can't really comment. This page explains a bit more about the NHS paying for treatment from providers outside the NHS.

And private health insurance costs a lot less then the US because, I assume, they do not have to fund emergency treatment since the NHS is there for that.
 
2012-02-19 11:02:05 PM  

Flint Ironstag: /CSB time. I badly tore a ligament in my ankle in December. Thought the swelling would go down after a day or so, but it didn't so I went to my local A+E. This was Saturday afternoon. Brand new hospital, spotless. Checked in and say down. Waited about twenty minutes to be looked at, sent for X Ray, waited about twenty minutes after that for the consultant to call me and we looked at the X Rays on her PC (all digital system, very high tech) and she said nothing was broken, I really just had to rest it.


Here's what would happen in the US.

I badly tore a ligament in my ankle in December. Thought the swelling would go down after a day or so, but it didn't so I went to my local emergency room. Waited about three hours to be looked at. They sent me to get X-rays, which took an additional two hours. They said it didn't look broken, but I should see a specialist. Made an appointment to see a specialist on Monday. I got lucky and got in two weeks later. The specialist, being $200,000 in debt to student loans, recommended surgery. The surgery did not make my ankle better, so I was sent to physical therapy. The PT, being $60,000 in debt to student loans, recommended I go through six months of rehab. Meanwhile, I'm fighting the insurance company to pay the $30,000 bill I had received at that time. I had to go hire a lawyer to fight the insurance company. My ankle was still not getting any better. I went to another specialist, who said the previous doctor had botched the surgery. My lawyer filed a lawsuit against that doctor. The insurance company won their case against me, so I'm on the hook for what is now $45,000. Because of my ankle I had not been able to work, so I filed for bankruptcy protection. Hopefully, I'll win my lawsuit and at least be able to come out even minus my ankle still being hurt. USA! USA! USA!
 
2012-02-19 11:02:09 PM  

Bungles: Yup, anyone can get private insurance (which can be supplemental services or accommodation, or essentially entirely replace NHS - even though you're still covered by the NHS if you need it) - it's a fraction of the cost of the US equivalent, else they'd have literally zero customers. The fact that the vast majority still choose to be sole NHS patients shows how people actually act in a free market. They prefer the care/cost of the NHS.

There's no-one stopping people from getting private care, and virtually anyone in employment could afford some sort of cover. Yet the vast majority don't, even the very richest.

Would that really be the case if the NHS was like some sort of 19C Calcutta hole, like Fox likes to suggest?


Although, I've heard from an expat -- again, it's just an anecdote that I can't verify -- that the NHS hospitals generally have people in wards where there's lots of people in a big room with only curtains for privacy. (The private hospitals have private or double rooms.) Unfortunately, Americans have gotten used to all sorts of fancy amenities in their hospitals... private rooms, food on demand, flat-screen TVs with DVD players...
 
2012-02-19 11:09:46 PM  
I wonder if HotAir got around to mentioning the fact that even Margaret goddamn Thatcher considered even touching the NHS? Thought not
 
2012-02-19 11:11:56 PM  
I predict people will try different methods of improving healthcare while others protest. They will all have valid points, but until they decide to work together toward an agreement we will try half good ideas for quite some time into the future.
 
2012-02-19 11:12:16 PM  

elchip: Bungles: Yup, anyone can get private insurance (which can be supplemental services or accommodation, or essentially entirely replace NHS - even though you're still covered by the NHS if you need it) - it's a fraction of the cost of the US equivalent, else they'd have literally zero customers. The fact that the vast majority still choose to be sole NHS patients shows how people actually act in a free market. They prefer the care/cost of the NHS.

There's no-one stopping people from getting private care, and virtually anyone in employment could afford some sort of cover. Yet the vast majority don't, even the very richest.

Would that really be the case if the NHS was like some sort of 19C Calcutta hole, like Fox likes to suggest?

Although, I've heard from an expat -- again, it's just an anecdote that I can't verify -- that the NHS hospitals generally have people in wards where there's lots of people in a big room with only curtains for privacy. (The private hospitals have private or double rooms.) Unfortunately, Americans have gotten used to all sorts of fancy amenities in their hospitals... private rooms, food on demand, flat-screen TVs with DVD players...


In a typical ward in 2012, there would be other people there, but in *most* hospitals the numbers are low (say 4 or 6 beds, screened with curtains, as you say). In serious cases, most ICUs etc have single occupancy areas.


If having three others in your room isn't your cup of tea, than you can get private insurance which can guarantee things like a private room in a private wing, and an essentially hotel-like experience.

The difference is that sort of coverage might be £20/month, not hundreds. You can pay out of pocket too: a family member recently gave birth at the Kensington and Chelsea, one of of the hospitals in London favoured by celebrities, that has private and NHS wings. 5 days in a beautiful bespoke private room, a 30 hour complex labour that ended in a caesarian, and full post-care cost £9,000. I don't know the US equivalent costs, but I expect that to seem incredibly cheap.
 
2012-02-19 11:13:20 PM  

elchip:
Although, I've heard from an expat -- again, it's just an anecdote that I can't verify -- that the NHS hospitals generally have people in wards where there's lots of people in a big room with only curtains for privacy. (The private hospitals have private or double rooms.) Unfortunately, Americans have gotten used to all sorts of fancy amenities in their hospitals... private rooms, food on demand, flat-screen TVs with DVD players...


That's pretty much true. That last time I visited an in patient the ward was a long corridor with bays of four beds, with curtains. I believe you can pay for a private room, I was in hospital for a few days when I was about eighteen and got a free upgrade to a private room.
 
2012-02-19 11:15:55 PM  

Bungles: Wait, NHS = Sharia Law now. Is that the latest bullet point?


Damn, that would fly well at CPAC
 
2012-02-19 11:21:21 PM  

bulldg4life: In a shocking turn of events, having some combination of public/private insurance is what a large percentage of Americans are advocating. In fact, many systems have a public base of care and you are free to supplement that with private care.

What a crazy idiotic idea. Why...they expect 20% overhead? F*ck that.


Lowered expectations. It's always either been paying a $50-100 premium that pretty much obligates you to be sick a few times a month, then pay unreasonable 'co-pays' (Thought my three years of unused coverage would pay that.) once something happens.

Medicare/Medicaid are pretty good, until that flu turns into pneumonia. Myself, I can't imagine a fed system that works any better, even with good implementations dotted on the map On top of that, 'socialism' is a profanity, thanks to the Cold War relics in power, who likely have blood pressure spikes whenever they see a red light. Is it any wonder we're willing to compromise so early?
 
2012-02-19 11:23:13 PM  
img827.imageshack.us

FYI this is a quote (for 30 year old male) I just got from a UK private health insurer, the biggest one with lots of their own hospitals. Option one covers everything, including private room etc.

/Looks to me that paying for option two and option three would get you option one for £5 less....
 
2012-02-19 11:28:15 PM  

Flint Ironstag: That's pretty much true


And the difference comes down in part to the age of hospitals and design philosophies, not how medical care is funded. Shared rooms were the norm in the US and can still be found at plenty of older hospitals. Private rooms are the expected status quo in hospitals for only a couple decades here. And that is just a matter of hospital design philosophy, where things have changed fairly quickly. I once worked at a hospital that was opened in 1980, it had shared rooms, two people to a room. Then a few years back I spent a few days at a hospital that was opened in the mid 90s, all rooms are private rooms. When the hospital where I worked was built, the idea was that a room shared by more than two people was not ideal for patients. When the hospital I was at was built, thinking had changed to say that private rooms are ideal for patients.
 
2012-02-19 11:44:09 PM  

elchip: tenpoundsofcheese: We should find out why Mexico is doing such a good job and copy their healthcare system. Healthcare costs about 1/9th of the US and a life expectancy only 3 years lower!

Maybe the sad truth is that for many recent advancements, we haven't seen much of a payoff in life expectancy. i.e., we've spent $200 billion on cancer research in the last 40 years; the death rate from cancer has dropped only 5 percent since 1950.


I don't think those numbers include cost of research, but i could be wrong. I thought it was just spending on actual health care.
 
2012-02-19 11:53:40 PM  
d_the_sandman:

And I'm just playing devil's advocate on this one, but one aspect of the USvsUK healthcare debate that left-leaning folks rarely seem to address is the question of innovation. The current US model is no more sustainable than the UK's, but we do still lead the world in medical innovation.

That's because who pays for health coverage has nothing at all to do with healthcare research in the US. We have the US National Institutes of Health with a $31 billion research budget. Almost all our advances in therapies and the initial development in new drugs come from there, not individual hospitals or insurers.

Aetna, Blue Cross etcetera do not fund innovation, so it really doesn't make any sense to drag the research angle in to a discussion of who pays for patient care in the US.
 
2012-02-19 11:54:54 PM  

tenpoundsofcheese: We should find out why Mexico is doing such a good job and copy their healthcare system. Healthcare costs about 1/9th of the US and a life expectancy only 3 years lower!


Mexico basically has a single payer system. Publicly funded. Privately delivered.
 
2012-02-19 11:57:15 PM  

relcec: Flappyhead: relcec: Flint Ironstag: I love the US, and love visiting and have had great times and met lots of great people, including cops, but when I remember that the UK has the NHS and the US has HOAs I am glad I live in the UK. You folks are really getting screwed in that deal...

you point and laugh at us, but the rest of the civilized world points and laughs at the NHS.

relcec: Flint Ironstag: And funny how they do not mention that the NHS costs less than half, per capita, than the US spends on healthcare.

So much for "bloated government inefficiency..."

our governemnt limits the numbers of doctors that can be trained through residency programs in any given year in order to keep the doctor supply artificially low and jack up their salaries.
their government designed their system to keep costs low. our governemnt designed our system to rip us off at every stage of the game. so yeah, it's the governments fault. the governemnt makes healthcare expensive at every single point it can. I have to go the doc every three months to get prescription for f*cking lunesta and pay $120. I'll probably have to do this for the rest of my god damn life. for some f*cking sleeping pills.

Make up your damn mind jackhole.

care to explain your problem?

/and I don't why the British system isn't rated as highly as it's neighbors, I just know it isn't. I'll withdraw my diagnosis. that was my politics seeping in obviously.


I think I know his problem. he can't sleep...is irrational and doesn't understand cost shifting and many other things that happen in the medical industry.
 
2012-02-20 12:01:11 AM  
d_the_sandman:

And I'm just playing devil's advocate on this one, but one aspect of the USvsUK healthcare debate that left-leaning folks rarely seem to address is the question of innovation. The current US model is no more sustainable than the UK's, but we do still lead the world in medical innovation.

That's because who pays for health coverage has nothing at all to do with healthcare research in the US. We have the US National Institutes of Health with a $31 billion research budget. Almost all our advances in therapies and the initial development in new drugs come from there, not individual hospitals or insurers.

Aetna, Blue Cross etcetera do not fund innovation, so it really doesn't make any sense to drag the research angle in to a discussion of who pays for patient care in the US.


Or to put it more succinctly, the innovation side of medical care in the US is *ALREADY* almost entirely publicly funded, and has been for over a century.
 
2012-02-20 12:02:12 AM  

Flint Ironstag: Really? I live here and have used it, as have many of my family and friends, with no problems. What's wrong with it?


There is nothing wrong with the NHS. My father-in-law got reasonable, measured care for the cancer the found on his kidney, and prostrate treatment. There was no issue with blame of medical records, because they have ALL his medical records. Also, There weren't a dozen people dedicated to fighting payment (who had to be paid , regardless of payment or non-payment of bills)

We need single payer here in the US. Romney is right: It's a matter of personal responsibility, since people get emergency care when they need it.

Also, I was employed to do systems integration on large regional hospitals in the late 1990s in the UK such that medical records could be transferred from the records system to the admissions system. How many US hospitals would have found that taking 25 minutes off each patient's triage process would be worth investment?
 
2012-02-20 12:05:28 AM  

tenpoundsofcheese: We should find out why Mexico is doing such a good job and copy their healthcare system. Healthcare costs about 1/9th of the US and a life expectancy only 3 years lower!


Less obesity and smoking.
 
2012-02-20 12:15:44 AM  

BSABSVR: It's always funny watching people who have never left their birth city try to expound at length about the experiences of people in other countries.


I like when people try to tell me that I'm better off with American health care and my "Cadillac insurance plan" than I was in Canada with my Yukon health care card. Experientially, I'm not, and yet rightists repeatedly try to tell me that I should believe them instead of my lying eyes.

Everything is worse here. I pay out the ass for care that wouldn't pass muster at Whitehorse General, and health care in the Yukon is the laughingstock of Canada.
 
2012-02-20 12:25:08 AM  

snuff3r: Test for whether to not bother reading the full article:

1) Blather? Check
2) Derp? Check
3) Nonsense? Check

Nice try, retardmitter.


How about it's a link to a wingnut site like the very appropriately named HotAir? Then you can avoid the blather, the derp and the nonsense altogether.

/NGTRTFA
 
2012-02-20 12:28:28 AM  

hubiestubert: I'm sure that this will have no fallout with their public whatsoever.

Truly, it will be the best of all possible worlds...


Anyone remember Margaret Thatcher and the Poll Tax Riots?
 
2012-02-20 12:29:08 AM  

A Dark Evil Omen: health care in the Yukon


There's health care in the Yukon? ;)
 
2012-02-20 01:02:37 AM  

relcec: it just sucks compared to other places like france, spain, greece, luxembourg, italy, austria, some nordic countries, all of europe I guess. singapore and japan. really antiquated mostly.


Well, I live there and can say the system is fairly similar, it's just run on a smaller scale at the level of each autonomy. Similar to how Scotland and England have separate NHS systems. I have a private insurance card thanks to my contract, but it is around €40 per month and would never even consider it on my own, just use the government system. SaludMadrid (government) owns and operates hospitals, but there are also private hospitals. I mean, so they get enough business to warrant existing, but almost everyone I know (including rich people) just use the public system.
 
2012-02-20 01:02:42 AM  
If the government ever does this in Canada I will buy a gun
but they won't because they know they will lose
 
2012-02-20 01:14:05 AM  
Fun game: try to find any link that corroborates their claim, other than links to other blogs in the right wing echo chamber.

Not to mention that comparing Obamacare to the NHS in any way is just fundamentally retarded. In Britain, the government employs all doctors. Nobody in America, or in most parts of the world for that matter, thinks that is a good idea.
 
2012-02-20 01:16:09 AM  
www.davinciinstitute.com
Look how shiatty the nations that don't have health care are! Though it is interesting that the two biggest superpowers don't have universal healthcare.
 
2012-02-20 01:16:39 AM  

Without Fail: tenpoundsofcheese: We should find out why Mexico is doing such a good job and copy their healthcare system. Healthcare costs about 1/9th of the US and a life expectancy only 3 years lower!

Less obesity and smoking.


And more tacos!
 
2012-02-20 01:30:00 AM  

TheJoe03: Though it is interesting that the two biggest superpowers don't have universal healthcare.


One is a corrupt nightmare of rigged elections, lethal pollution, and a general disregard for the health and safety of anyone or anything. The other is China, which I also hear is a bit of a shiathole.
 
2012-02-20 01:30:58 AM  

WhyteRaven74: A Dark Evil Omen: health care in the Yukon

There's health care in the Yukon? ;)


Yep! We have roads and hospitals and electricity and everything!
 
2012-02-20 01:36:51 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: One is a corrupt nightmare of rigged elections, lethal pollution, and a general disregard for the health and safety of anyone or anything. The other is China, which I also hear is a bit of a shiathole.


Heyo!
 
2012-02-20 01:37:37 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

If only
 
2012-02-20 01:59:12 AM  
The only reason the UK is doing this is because they're trying to save money. They don't care if health care costs increase 30% or more because any increases will be paid by individuals or they won't get any care. The government is having budget issues so this is their brilliant idea on how to cut government spending. It's true, it will cut government spending, and bankrupt individuals instead or create tens of millions of uninsured just like America. Saying this is because government health care doesn't work well is very disingenuous and typical of right wing hacks who desperately want to make the American system look good when everyone knows it cannot compete with any single payer system.
 
2012-02-20 02:28:37 AM  
Keep pressurizing the people, your riots will just get bigger and bigger. Tear your farking society apart if you want.
 
2012-02-20 02:35:40 AM  
Now, I live in Australia, where we have a Public and Private health systems. Basically, if you don't have insurance, you still can use the public system, which provides a very high level of care, but you generally have longer wait times, less choice about your doctors, and had less comfortable accommodations in hospital. If you do have Insurance, which is usually far cheaper than insurance in the US, you get to use private facilities, with some out of pocket expenses, get quicker service, have greater choice of doctor (basically any doctor who'll take you, and who you can afford with your insurance), and you can have a private room at a private hospital. Part of the reason why being insured is so cheap here is because our Medicare pays for everyone, not just the uninsured, but contributes towards healthcare costs of insured patients too, with the insurance helping to pay the gap left between government funding and cost of service. It really helps keep the saftey of the public system with the options and benefits of a private system. I think that's the kind of direction that the NHS has been moving in for some years now, and it really is the best of both worlds - universal insurance for everyone, but the option of private insurance for those that want extra services.

My Fiancée had surgery to remove a tumour last year. Nasty thing, size of a tennis ball, wrapped around an artery and vein in her thigh. We went to a private hospital, saw a private surgeon of our choice (best in the state for that particular type of cancer), got radiotherapy at a private clinic two weeks after seeing him, had a team of doctors working on her, had an 8 hour surgery involving 3 different surgeons and spent 3 weeks in hospital (in a private room) recovering, and endless follow-ups, including 40 lymphoma treatment sessions (and more still to come). Now, we had private insurance, which costs under $1000 PER YEAR, and we weren't more than 3500 out of pocket by the end of it, though we could have gotten away with less if we went for less comfortable options.

Meanwhile, I saw a story on a forum the other day of an American who had health insurance at about 10x what we were paying for premiums, who still had to pay $20,000 out of pocket when she got cancer. If that were the case for us, even if we managed to afford the coverage, we'd be bankrupt by the time it came to paying the bills (especially considering she couldn't work during her ordeal). That's the last thing you want to happen to you when major health complications are hitting you. I'll take Australia's system every time, even with insurance.
 
2012-02-20 02:36:48 AM  

Somacandra: hubiestubert: Truly, it will be the best of all possible worlds...

[i.imgur.com image 316x400]


I think I love you.
 
2012-02-20 02:48:02 AM  

Bigdogdaddy: [1.bp.blogspot.com image 562x379]

If only


Their number is negligible and they are stupid, and they all post on fark.
 
2012-02-20 02:56:38 AM  

Flint Ironstag:

The UK is almost exactly average in healthcare spending and life expectancy. The US has well over twice the spending but a lower life expectancy. France and Luxembourg , which you praise, have far higher costs but not much higher LE.

There is a lot of evidence that Japan and other Asian countries have a very good LE due to traditional diet and that LE is dropping with the adoption of a western diet, skewing those figures unfairly.

But if the NHS "sucks" then how come the US spends well over twice as much but Americans die younger? Is it all gun deaths?


I can see that we're going to have to break another persons bubble here.

Life expectancy has almost nothing at all to do with the quality of health care available. Irregardless of where they live, Japanese women have the longest life expectancy, that's just genetics working for them.

We have a lot of health problems in the United States that result directly from poor life style choices, including diet and exercise, and no matter the quality of your health care a poor diet and exercise routine will not lead you to a long happy life.

If you really want to see how good a health care system is then check the mortality rates for things like cancer. As an example, the mortality rate for prostate cancer is significantly lower in the United States... Though I haven't checked the stats in the last couple of years I've been hearing the "life expectancy has something to do with healthcare" lie for going on a decade or more now, so perhaps things have changed.

The "pay more for worse results" myth using infant mortality and life expectancy as "examples" is just one of those things liberals cannot let go it seems.
 
2012-02-20 03:39:05 AM  

maddermaxx: I'll take Australia's system every time, even with insurance.


Take me with you? please?
 
2012-02-20 03:44:27 AM  

randomjsa: Life expectancy has almost nothing at all to do with the quality of health care available. Irregardless of where they live, Japanese women have the longest life expectancy, that's just genetics working for them.


What a load of bullsh*t.
 
2012-02-20 04:04:37 AM  
Irregardless... jesus.
 
2012-02-20 04:47:38 AM  

AmorousRedDragon: randomjsa: Life expectancy has almost nothing at all to do with the quality of health care available. Irregardless of where they live, Japanese women have the longest life expectancy, that's just genetics working for them.

What a load of bullsh*t.


Well, they do eat lots of fish. Just sayin' My "homies" (sp?) in Slovenia can eat whatever they want and not have high cholesterol. Same with me. I told my doc my eating habits and he can't figure it out. Anyways, the Brits can have Obama as their mentor for their health care system. I'll spring for his one-way ticket and a crate of whatever brand of cigarette he smokes.
 
2012-02-20 05:09:43 AM  

relcec:
it's actually the socialist model, that's why I called it that. I get you're none to bright ...


I get you're none to bright too.
 
2012-02-20 05:26:29 AM  

randomjsa: The "pay more for worse results" myth using infant mortality and life expectancy as "examples" is just one of those things liberals cannot let go it seems.


you're absolutely correct that the results are better in the usa. outcomes for almost every disease are the best in the world. but the cost is phenomenally high. we need to fix that. how? ehhh, don't ask me.
 
2012-02-20 05:58:01 AM  
i734.photobucket.com

Go on Cameron, you Tory filth, attack the NHS and condemn your party to the dustbin of history where it belongs.

i734.photobucket.com
 
2012-02-20 06:06:13 AM  

SilentStrider: you know.

if you want a system that actually works, perhaps you should look at Germany's. Not ours.


Hahaha! Oh wait, you're serious? Let me laugh even harder!

Summary of my experience with the German system over the last 7 years:

Generalists and allergy specialist:
-first prescribe a placebo for 3 months [start of the chain with a new doctor]
-if no change, prescribe a cheap generic for 3 months
-if no change, prescribe another formulation for a couple of months [loop on this line until you change doctor]

My wife has a few allergies that do require specific medication, however German doctors seem to have received the strict order to refuse to prescribe said medication. If you change doctor while in the chain above, you start the process from scratch. We have now given up and cross the border to get her cortisone cream and allergy treatments. In 7 years, no German doctor has been able to pinpoint the source of her allergies. On the first visit in Luxembourg, a doctor pointed the most probable cause and gave her the correct medication.

Emergencies:

Our last visit to the emergencies was funny as hell. My wife suffered more damage in the emergencies than in the fire that caused her visit to the emergencies. They also kept us in separate parts of the waiting room for hours while telling me that she was still in intensive care and they would call me as soon as she was out. They also released her without removing the catheters and electrodes.
 
2012-02-20 06:29:33 AM  
Funny thing. Americans spend their time biatching about their healthcare system whilst denigrating everyone else's. Yet everyone else pretty much says they would not trade anything for the American system.

Then again what can you expect when in the 22nd century you have an 18th century healthcare system that is propped by people with the intelligence of 12th century peasants.

Worst thing, is so many who sheik and scream about "SOCIALISM" during the healthcare debate are fat ass morons living off Medicare (sorry but a bunch of fat old people who drive Buicks to their Tea Begger rally are not paying their own way). I wish we could just split this country in two and let the moron class have their own little conservative heaven of tax cuts, free market, and Jesusland.
 
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