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(TechEBlog)   Five cool hydrogen experiments   (techeblog.com) divider line 28
    More: Cool, hydrogen, experiments  
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6760 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Feb 2012 at 5:08 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-18 12:01:19 PM
The bit towards the end in #1 about hydrite really surprised me. It's 100% illegal to buy, but 100% legal to make yourself -- as long as you build your own accelerator and pay the steep licensing fee. What a country.
 
2012-02-18 02:24:50 PM
the solar+battery+hydrogen+heat pump house design was pretty awesome. of course what he calls "super insulation" is "minimum code" where live :D ROTFL
 
2012-02-18 03:07:10 PM
Eyes in the dark, one moon circles.
 
2012-02-18 05:12:41 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: The bit towards the end in #1 about hydrite really surprised me. It's 100% illegal to buy, but 100% legal to make yourself -- as long as you build your own accelerator and pay the steep licensing fee. What a country.


There are other metal hydrides; the one he mentioned isn't the only one that will bind hydrogen. Also, Bob Lazar has an, uh, "interesting" history.
 
2012-02-18 05:25:37 PM
Hydrite is illegal to buy?

I would like to know more.
 
mhd
2012-02-18 05:41:33 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2012-02-18 06:17:43 PM
Sometimes I think about how the dinosaurs lived on this earth for hundreds of millions of years, and man has only had his combustible engine for 150 years give or take. In that time we've damn near depleted our fossil fuel supply. Then I think, would it be possible to deplete all the hydrogen in the universe? Hell yeah, we can.
 
2012-02-18 06:19:37 PM

Sliding Carp: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: The bit towards the end in #1 about hydrite really surprised me. It's 100% illegal to buy, but 100% legal to make yourself -- as long as you build your own accelerator and pay the steep licensing fee. What a country.

There are other metal hydrides; the one he mentioned isn't the only one that will bind hydrogen. Also, Bob Lazar has an, uh, "interesting" history.


yes, yes he does...but he does appear to have a good degree of engineering skill and physics education.

But there are a good number of professionals and academics with the level of knowledge he displays publicly. Is he a liar about working at Area 51/S-4? I could care less...that was an entertaining demonstration.
 
2012-02-18 06:24:05 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: The bit towards the end in #1 about hydrite really surprised me. It's 100% illegal to buy, but 100% legal to make yourself -- as long as you build your own accelerator and pay the steep licensing fee. What a country.


Yeah, it's also a load of bullshiat. The lithium isotope doesn't have much effect on its hydrogen bonding, and there's no reason in hell to use deuterium as a fuel, so the whole thing about lithium-6 deuteride being used in weapons is a non-sequitur. You can buy ordinary lithium hydride pretty easily.

And even if you did want 6LiD, you don't need a particle accelerator to make it. Bullshiat video is bullshiat.

/Didn't bother watching the rest of the bullshiat video.
 
2012-02-18 06:39:19 PM

Professor Science: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: The bit towards the end in #1 about hydrite really surprised me. It's 100% illegal to buy, but 100% legal to make yourself -- as long as you build your own accelerator and pay the steep licensing fee. What a country.

Yeah, it's also a load of bullshiat. The lithium isotope doesn't have much effect on its hydrogen bonding, and there's no reason in hell to use deuterium as a fuel, so the whole thing about lithium-6 deuteride being used in weapons is a non-sequitur. You can buy ordinary lithium hydride pretty easily.

And even if you did want 6LiD, you don't need a particle accelerator to make it. Bullshiat video is bullshiat.

/Didn't bother watching the rest of the bullshiat video.


This.

There are other hydrogen storage materials in the works too (ammonia borane, organic hydrides, etc), some of them being funded by the US DOE. Paranoid video is bullshiat as well.
 
2012-02-18 07:05:24 PM
Fetch ze Hofmann apparatus!
 
2012-02-18 07:22:27 PM

LeroyBourne: Then I think, would it be possible to deplete all the hydrogen in the universe? Hell yeah, we can.


You know the hydrogen isn't lost when you burn it, right? It just turns back into water...

=Smidge=
 
2012-02-18 07:50:24 PM

Professor Science: You can buy ordinary lithium hydride pretty easily.


They also sell lithium deuteride (new window). It's not lithium-6 specifically, but the Castle Bravo test demonstrated that isotope enrichment of the lithium isn't necessary for a thermonuclear weapon.

Bondith: There are other hydrogen storage materials in the works too (ammonia borane, organic hydrides, etc),


Also chicken feathers (new window).
 
2012-02-18 08:04:11 PM
6. Ignite it

Take a bunch of empty tin cans,
tie a string around them,
fill cans with hydrogen,
hang tin cans out of the 3rd floor chem lab room,
use a long stick to ignite the hydrogen.
(like this, just with several cans hanging outside the window)


When doing it several times on the same day because it was one of the experiments the chemistry teachers and the advanced chemistry class "performed" during the public school fair, the cans must have been a bit too big or at least too full (a small bucket might have been involved..); this led to police stopping by - they had sent out people to investigate the source of the rather mysterious explosions they had been hearing all day (their HQ was a few blocks away)



Chem class was awesome, as were all the teachers.
(Pyro)maniacs, the lot of them. Good times. :)

"I just love demonstrating this experiment to students: it's not easy to make it work, but the explosion if it doesn't work is really pretty. I always hope it fails and somehow it usually does."

"You know that the biology rooms directly below us are identical to ours, including the second fume hood in the corner? They don't have a real use for it and leave it open to use it as an additional lab workplace if needed. Their fume hood and hours are connected to the same vent. So if they get cheeky and start talking trash again, we'll use our fume hood to vaporize some bromine, close our sash and 'forget' to switch on the ventilation. The stench will sink down into their rooms in no time."
 
2012-02-18 08:23:47 PM

Ivo Shandor: They also sell lithium deuteride (new window). It's not lithium-6 specifically, but the Castle Bravo test demonstrated that isotope enrichment of the lithium isn't necessary for a thermonuclear weapon.


I don't want no nuclear freeze.
No funny looking skin disease.
I don't want my face blown apart.
So the next time you see a Commie -
might be somebody's mommy.
Forget about those bombs and
light a fart
 
2012-02-18 08:36:43 PM

The Voice of Doom: 6. Ignite it

Take a bunch of empty tin cans,
tie a string around them,
fill cans with hydrogen,
hang tin cans out of the 3rd floor chem lab room,
use a long stick to ignite the hydrogen.
(like this, just with several cans hanging outside the window)


What we used to do in high school chem class was to fill a 2 liter soda bottle 2/3 of the way full of Hydrogen and 1/3 with Oxygen. We had lid we had modified to pass through the wires from a power cord we had cut off. Place some steel wool between the ends of the wires, make sure you have a long enough extension cord, and plug it in! Good times.
 
2012-02-18 09:12:53 PM

LeroyBourne: Sometimes I think about how the dinosaurs lived on this earth for hundreds of millions of years, and man has only had his combustible engine for 150 years give or take. In that time we've damn near depleted our fossil fuel supply. Then I think, would it be possible to deplete all the hydrogen in the universe? Hell yeah, we can.


It takes a star the size of the sun nearly 10 billion years to burn off all of it's Hydrogen. Now consider that there are approximately 200-400 billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy alone. Now all these stars don't burn their Hydrogen supply at the same rate, but I think you can appreciate the difference in scale here.
 
2012-02-18 10:32:19 PM

lousyskater: LeroyBourne: Sometimes I think about how the dinosaurs lived on this earth for hundreds of millions of years, and man has only had his combustible engine for 150 years give or take. In that time we've damn near depleted our fossil fuel supply. Then I think, would it be possible to deplete all the hydrogen in the universe? Hell yeah, we can.

It takes a star the size of the sun nearly 10 billion years to burn off all of it's Hydrogen. Now consider that there are approximately 200-400 billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy alone. Now all these stars don't burn their Hydrogen supply at the same rate, but I think you can appreciate the difference in scale here.


Especially when you consider that all of the energy that turned inorganic carbon to organic carbon to eventually fossil fuels came from only a very tiny sliver of the energy output of the sun with all its hydrogen fusion. The difference in scale itself has trouble fitting in the human imagination.
 
2012-02-18 10:57:33 PM

LeroyBourne: Sometimes I think about how the dinosaurs lived on this earth for hundreds of millions of years, and man has only had his combustible engine for 150 years give or take. In that time we've damn near depleted our fossil fuel supply. Then I think, would it be possible to deplete all the hydrogen in the universe? Hell yeah, we can.


www.troycitydesign.com
 
2012-02-18 11:28:31 PM

Smidge204: You know the hydrogen isn't lost when you burn it, right? It just turns back into water...


the hydrogen in the videos (electrolysis/combustion) is just being used as a very inefficient 'battery' to store energy to use later.

the real bang is using it for fusion, in which case it is 'lost' through transformation into heavier elements. though the original comment was surely made in jest (or stupidity), it is at least conceivable that a civilization of type III or higher on the Kardashev Scale could at least put a dent in this. though, of course, nothing like this has ever been observed.
 
2012-02-19 12:02:27 AM
Chemical and nuclear "burning" are rather different processes in scale. One of the motivations for nuclear science was to estimate how long the Sun would last burning at its current rate if it was made of coal or some other chemical burnable. It's a pretty simple calculation and it came out to 300,000 yr or some such. Evidence came to light that the Earth was significantly older than that and by extension was the Sun.
 
2012-02-19 01:27:31 AM

LeroyBourne: Sometimes I think about how the dinosaurs lived on this earth for hundreds of millions of years, and man has only had his combustible engine for 150 years give or take. In that time we've damn near depleted our fossil fuel supply. Then I think, would it be possible to deplete all the hydrogen in the universe? Hell yeah, we can.


It just takes the proper American "can do" attitude.
 
2012-02-19 01:55:44 AM
yagottabefarkingkiddingme...

It is this easy to manufacture hydrogen and run a Corvette for 400 miles on 4 tanks? Folks, we're getting screwed if we have no alternative to gasoline and diesel. This looks too easy...but like a moth to a flame, I have to learn more about this. This would save me a fortune.

Has anyone on Fark done this?

WTF ending of the video. Strange people are strange.
 
2012-02-19 02:32:00 AM
Link (Snake oil salesman)

Last video info on guy.
 
2012-02-19 07:19:13 AM

Kazan: the solar+battery+hydrogen+heat pump house design was pretty awesome. of course what he calls "super insulation" is "minimum code" where live :D ROTFL


Initially, I thought, "Hey, I could do some of that too..." Then, as the video went along, I realized that his setup requires as much equipment as a medium-sized office building. You'd probably need around 1000ft2 just for the 'physical plant'. Plus room for the solar cells, hydrogen tanks, etc.
 
2012-02-19 08:47:16 AM

yagottabefarkinkiddinme: yagottabefarkingkiddingme...

It is this easy to manufacture hydrogen and run a Corvette for 400 miles on 4 tanks? Folks, we're getting screwed if we have no alternative to gasoline and diesel. This looks too easy...but like a moth to a flame, I have to learn more about this. This would save me a fortune.

Has anyone on Fark done this?

WTF ending of the video. Strange people are strange.


It has to do with a series of costs, and some of those have to do with the momentum and inertia of the larger systems that make older practices convenient and cost-effective.

Until very recently in history, petroleum was dirt cheap, so it made no sense to pursue more complicated methods that cost more. By this point, a century into that habit, we've built up a global petroleum infrastructure that more or less requires us to stick with it for now, until it becomes untenable for one reason or another, or something dramatically more advantageous comes along.

I agree that the solid-stored hydrogen system is superior in most ways, but it also costs more to install, as the bottle system is more complicated than the current low-tech gas tank system. But that's a petty point compared to the real problem: We have a massive fuel-supply infrastructure for petrofuels, and practically none for hydrogen. That's not going to change overnight, because it can't. ANY supply infrastructure must be costly and complicated, so replacing one with another is an enormous commitment, and will require more than an argument of, "This is better." The replacement must be either necessary or *dramatically* better, in order to move that kind of change.

As shown in TFA, that change is more likely to happen slowly through DIY efforts. As soon as people figure out how to cost-effectively make and store their own hydrogen for various uses -- especially if they can do it from low-cost energy source such as solar power (and don't actually need a damn accelerator to do it) -- they're going to want to effect that change any way they can, and it's much easier to redirect one's own inertia than that of an entire continental energy supply system.
 
2012-02-19 08:57:34 AM

RobotSpider: Kazan: the solar+battery+hydrogen+heat pump house design was pretty awesome. of course what he calls "super insulation" is "minimum code" where live :D ROTFL

Initially, I thought, "Hey, I could do some of that too..." Then, as the video went along, I realized that his setup requires as much equipment as a medium-sized office building. You'd probably need around 1000ft2 just for the 'physical plant'. Plus room for the solar cells, hydrogen tanks, etc.


I neglected to mention a very important factor involved in this, and that's the power needed to make hydrogen. Right now, it's not competitively cost-effective to make hydrogen on an industrial scale, because it takes a lot of energy to crack water to obtain it. Despite the enormous prevalence of hydrogen in the universe, we can't actually pipe it in from the Sun, and we don't have free hydrogen lying around for the taking, either. We have to instead liberate it from various chemical bonds that contain it, and electrolysis is the only one shown to be at all cost-effective. Nevertheless, it takes a good deal of energy, and it's easy to put more energy into that conversion than you can reasonably obtain from the hydrogen you get from it. Since any energy solution must deliver more energy than it requires to obtain (e.g., it takes less a barrel of petroleum to extract, refine, and deliver a barrel of refined petroleum fuel for use), hydrogen is only practical if we can obtain it for a good deal less money and energy than we get out of using it at the other end of the system.

The solar-powered hydrolyser in #2 is the one I like best, because although the capital investment is substantial, the input energy is essentially free after that, so over time the net efficiency of the system increases (notwithstanding costs of maintenance and repair). I've often thought of such external energy sources as likely solutions to the water-cracking problem, and in similar considerations also. (For example, I've been wondering for a good while now if ground-heat systems and deep-well geothermal systems could be set up to be self-circulating.)
 
2012-02-19 09:50:53 AM
That house system looks pretty interesting. Of course, I said something similar about James May's take on a hydrogen-powered car and a (rather obvious) shill for the oil industry went crazy in the thread.
 
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