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(Orlando Sentinel)   Do you think your precocious kindergartener is ready for college but being discriminated against for her age? Don't worry, the Feds have your back   ( orlandosentinel.com) divider line
    More: Stupid, U.S. Department of Education, colleges, community colleges  
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13470 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Feb 2012 at 3:24 PM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-18 02:29:07 PM  
So, it's discrimination for children not to go to college for their age, but barring them from buyin beer and cigarettes isn't? How about the age restrictions on driving?
 
2012-02-18 03:26:37 PM  
But then again it is a community college, so it is more of an adult day-care than an actual college.
 
2012-02-18 03:28:10 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

Frowns upon community college's shenanigans
 
2012-02-18 03:29:18 PM  

cman: So, it's discrimination for children not to go to college for their age, but barring them from buyin beer and cigarettes isn't? How about the age restrictions on driving?


Scholastic merit is different from restrictions on purchasing poison or piloting machinery.

Granted, some little kids are quite good at driving. I'd support provisions allowing them to operate vehicles, provided they can prove their competence.

Hell, we don't even ask adults to prove competence, so it's still a little unfair.

Too bad. Get a helmet.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-02-18 03:32:21 PM  
"What's the worst that can happen, honestly?"

"It was still September when your daddy was quite surprised to find you with the working girls in the county jail."
 
2012-02-18 03:32:25 PM  
How about let the kids be kids, instead of pushing them to be adults, before their time.
 
2012-02-18 03:32:59 PM  
Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.
 
2012-02-18 03:35:34 PM  
It was a dual-enrollment college/high school program, the 12 year old is homeschooled, she had the test scores, she met all the academic requirements for the program. There was nothing but calendar age keeping her out.

A parent even volunteered to show up and supervise her on campus if the college preferred, so there was no liability or safety issue.

This is hardly a case of the kid living in the dorms, etc. Since it's dual enrollment, it's just a matter of the kid taking specific classes on campus--which would generally be classes that are beyond her parents' ability to teach her at home. In a conventional high school case, it would be classes beyond those the high school offers. So it's pretty much the same difference.

What it comes down to is this child is "in high school" early.

Sounds like a tempest in a tea pot.
 
2012-02-18 03:35:47 PM  
Tag is for Subby.
 
2012-02-18 03:37:48 PM  

eggrolls: Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.


This. 100% this.

/sick and tired of the entitlement generation
 
2012-02-18 03:39:05 PM  
t0.gstatic.com
 
2012-02-18 03:39:29 PM  
They should let her in, I mean, honestly..... what's the worst that could happen?
 
2012-02-18 03:41:24 PM  

eggrolls: Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.


Just like health insurance?
 
2012-02-18 03:41:37 PM  

Trance750: How about let the kids be kids, instead of pushing them to be adults, before their time.


This isn't the kid "going to college."

This is Dual Enrollment.

In this case, it means this kid is still a homeschooled 12 year old who gets to take a couple of classes at the local community college in cool things her parents aren't equipped to teach, and that the local high school doesn't offer, either.

She'll be taking them alongside students from the local high school who will also be fish-out-of-water there on campus, just there for a couple of classes a week.

It's a reasonable educational and social enrichment opportunity for a 12 year old homeschooled kid. She will still have plenty of hours in the day and the week to be a kid.
 
2012-02-18 03:42:51 PM  
HEALTH CARE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT! EVER.

I don't know why, but this is what this thread makes me think of.
 
2012-02-18 03:43:10 PM  
First time the kid hears about someone *farking* another at a party we will have a headline reporting a lawsuit...
 
2012-02-18 03:43:36 PM  
The parents have totally screwed up this child. That is too young to go to college. The kid is missing out on being a kid.

Change her name to Sheldon and be done with it.
 
2012-02-18 03:43:52 PM  

MrFisher_84: HEALTH CARE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT! EVER.

I don't know why, but this is what this thread makes me think of.


Because I posted it, and you read it and reposted it?
 
2012-02-18 03:43:54 PM  

eggrolls: Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.


She had the test scores, higher scores than at least half of those admitted. If you had those test scores and were told you couldn't take classes, you'd be screaming about the arbitrary and unfair decision.
 
2012-02-18 03:45:30 PM  

rebelyell2006: MrFisher_84: HEALTH CARE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT! EVER.

I don't know why, but this is what this thread makes me think of.

Because I posted it, and you read it and reposted it?


No, because I started typing it before you posted it. When the comments refreshed after I posted it, yours was the first new comment.
 
2012-02-18 03:45:38 PM  

rebelyell2006: eggrolls: Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.

Just like health insurance?


transitionculture.org
 
2012-02-18 03:47:18 PM  

chuckufarlie: The parents have totally screwed up this child. That is too young to go to college. The kid is missing out on being a kid.

Change her name to Sheldon and be done with it.


I sat in on a college class when I was 13. I also was too young to enroll, but the professor was a family friend and let me take the class anyway. It was fun - intro to archaeology.

I certainly didn't miss out on being a kid for taking a course I was interested in.

And the Sheldon reference makes no sense given his mother.
 
2012-02-18 03:47:42 PM  
People don't realize school isn't just for learning facts. You go to learn to work with others, deal with conflict, improve social skills etc. You move up more than 1 grade, the rest of your classmates have pubes and you're sitting there saying "Where's mine?" Everyone else went to the party the night before, you, you played Bobble and were in bed by 8. Yeah, you memorized the answers the night before every test in school , but now you're 20 years old in a work environment and your colleague on a project doesn't want to do it your way, you gonna call mommy? Will you have the skills to try to compromise? Or will you shut down and get stomped on?
 
2012-02-18 03:47:46 PM  
Is she screwing her teacher?
 
2012-02-18 03:48:39 PM  
"If she meets all the qualifications but for her age, then why not let her in?" her mother, Louise Racine, told the Orlando Sentinel in 2010. "What's the worst that can happen, honestly?"

I believe the school is thinking that the worst might be that she see's some other student watching porn, or she goes to study at a friends dorm room and snags a beer, or some random pedophile walking through campus kidnaps her. Well not really any of those situations as much as the giant lawsuit and media firestorm over how they didn't protect the young and precious snowflake.
 
2012-02-18 03:57:09 PM  
I'm with the parents on this one. The CC's reasoning is stupid.

/And so are the commenters here saying she's too young to take CC classes.
 
2012-02-18 03:58:41 PM  

Karac: "If she meets all the qualifications but for her age, then why not let her in?" her mother, Louise Racine, told the Orlando Sentinel in 2010. "What's the worst that can happen, honestly?"

I believe the school is thinking that the worst might be that she see's some other student watching porn, or she goes to study at a friends dorm room and snags a beer, or some random pedophile walking through campus kidnaps her. Well not really any of those situations as much as the giant lawsuit and media firestorm over how they didn't protect the young and precious snowflake.


It's a community college. There's no dorms.
 
2012-02-18 04:00:31 PM  

eggrolls: Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.


If someone is intelligent enough, and demonstrates this by outscoring half the kids there on standardized tests then it should be guaranteed.

Also, you're a tool.
 
2012-02-18 04:00:35 PM  

eggrolls: Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.


This just in:

If you pay for it with tax dollars, you cannot use unlawful criteria to discriminate in whom you serve.

It's a community college. A public college. Her parents' taxes help pay for it.

Community colleges have a very different mandate for serving the communities they are in than selective-enrollment universities and other selective-enrollment post-secondary institutions have.

Some community colleges are mandated to accept residents of the communities they serve.

If you are a resident of one of those communities, then getting into your local community college is, in fact, a guaranteed right that comes along with being a taxpayer in that community.

Just like every child in the community is entitled, as a guaranteed right, to a Free, Appropriate, Public Education (K-12).

Community colleges that have a mandate to accept residents of their communities generally have that mandate defined and specified, and in a way that gives them some exceptions to the mandate, but in this case the authorities over them told the community college that age was not an acceptable exception to their mandate.

Anyway, just because you think something isn't a right doesn't mean it isn't.

There are things that are natural rights of man, like free speech and freedom of religion.

Then there are things that become rights because, for example, you paid money for them.

Getting into a selective college is not a right.

Depending on where someone is a resident and pays taxes, getting into a non-selective college very well may be a right.
 
2012-02-18 04:02:07 PM  
Why can't the little princess' parents continue their quest to educate her at home, I mean I'd think they should have attended college themselves to be qualified to teach snowflake up to this point, right?

Not the least bit surprised that a 12 year old could pass college entrance exams. Daily I babysit plenty of idiots whom are college or university educated, yet can't figure out the simplest software.
 
2012-02-18 04:03:02 PM  

Karac: "If she meets all the qualifications but for her age, then why not let her in?" her mother, Louise Racine, told the Orlando Sentinel in 2010. "What's the worst that can happen, honestly?"

I believe the school is thinking that the worst might be that she see's some other student watching porn, or she goes to study at a friends dorm room and snags a beer, or some random pedophile walking through campus kidnaps her. Well not really any of those situations as much as the giant lawsuit and media firestorm over how they didn't protect the young and precious snowflake.


Except her father offered to accompany her to class. So, he's taking responsibility for her welfare on campus.
 
2012-02-18 04:07:22 PM  

Julie Cochrane: eggrolls: Once more, for the idiots in the back row:

GETTING INTO COLLEGE IS NOT A GUARANTEED RIGHT. EVER.

As you were.

This just in:

If you pay for it with tax dollars, you cannot use unlawful criteria to discriminate in whom you serve.

It's a community college. A public college. Her parents' taxes help pay for it.

Community colleges have a very different mandate for serving the communities they are in than selective-enrollment universities and other selective-enrollment post-secondary institutions have.

Some community colleges are mandated to accept residents of the communities they serve.

If you are a resident of one of those communities, then getting into your local community college is, in fact, a guaranteed right that comes along with being a taxpayer in that community.

Just like every child in the community is entitled, as a guaranteed right, to a Free, Appropriate, Public Education (K-12).

Community colleges that have a mandate to accept residents of their communities generally have that mandate defined and specified, and in a way that gives them some exceptions to the mandate, but in this case the authorities over them told the community college that age was not an acceptable exception to their mandate.

Anyway, just because you think something isn't a right doesn't mean it isn't.

There are things that are natural rights of man, like free speech and freedom of religion.

Then there are things that become rights because, for example, you paid money for them.

Getting into a selective college is not a right.

Depending on where someone is a resident and pays taxes, getting into a non-selective college very well may be a right.


Thread over.
 
2012-02-18 04:07:31 PM  

alternative girlfriend: chuckufarlie: The parents have totally screwed up this child. That is too young to go to college. The kid is missing out on being a kid.

Change her name to Sheldon and be done with it.

I sat in on a college class when I was 13. I also was too young to enroll, but the professor was a family friend and let me take the class anyway. It was fun - intro to archaeology.

I certainly didn't miss out on being a kid for taking a course I was interested in.

And the Sheldon reference makes no sense given his mother.


Do you really think that the fact that you audited ONE college class is the same as enrolling full time? I certainly hope not.

Sheldon is a very smart guy with no social skills, no sense of humor and no sympathy for anybody. His mother has NOTHING to do with it.
 
2012-02-18 04:12:38 PM  
I wonder if there is specific courses she just can't get elsewhere. Or is it just the coolness / wow factor of being in college? It's a lot cheaper (free) to just take Ap courses in high school and then clep out the credits when you apply to college. I took AP everything (calc, lit, am history, language, etc) in HS, and then was handed 33 credits when applying to a well known state college, including clepping the 2nd language fluency requirement. But still being able to hang with kids my own age.

In concept, I support the idea of removing the age restriction. But I suggest her parents are doing this for the wrong reasons that have nothing to do with education or the child's best interest. If you're smart, you don't need to be at a community college to sit and read a book. Go to the library and knock yourself out.
 
2012-02-18 04:14:04 PM  
Think of the other kids. This will really stifle class discussion, especially with her dad there.
 
2012-02-18 04:14:06 PM  

chuckufarlie: The parents have totally screwed up this child. That is too young to go to college. The kid is missing out on being a kid.

Change her name to Sheldon and be done with it.


Not sure about that. When you're graduated from college at 15 or 16, think about the wide world of epic adventure that awaits your freshly educated ass out there before you even hit 18. There's a whole lot of education that won't come out of a book ahead for this kid, that's for sure. Hell, the parents would still be on the hook for paying for some of it until then.
 
2012-02-18 04:15:03 PM  

Gunny Walker: [t0.gstatic.com image 200x252]


Looking that up led me to this (http://www.guidespot.com/guides/chicks_im_totally_into) which is hilarious for reasons that I won't go into here, and the short part of the story is that I still don't understand this one at all...oh well.
 
2012-02-18 04:15:52 PM  

ThrobblefootSpectre: I wonder if there is specific courses she just can't get elsewhere. Or is it just the coolness / wow factor of being in college? It's a lot cheaper (free) to just take Ap courses in high school and then clep out the credits when you apply to college. I took AP everything (calc, lit, am history, language, etc) in HS, and then was handed 33 credits when applying to a well known state college, including clepping the 2nd language fluency requirement. But still being able to hang with kids my own age.

In concept, I support the idea of removing the age restriction. But I suggest her parents are doing this for the wrong reasons that have nothing to do with education or the child's best interest. If you're smart, you don't need to be at a community college to sit and read a book. Go to the library and knock yourself out.


It's hard to take AP courses when you're homeschooled, especially when you're of middle school age.
 
2012-02-18 04:16:49 PM  

alternative girlfriend: Karac: "If she meets all the qualifications but for her age, then why not let her in?" her mother, Louise Racine, told the Orlando Sentinel in 2010. "What's the worst that can happen, honestly?"

I believe the school is thinking that the worst might be that she see's some other student watching porn, or she goes to study at a friends dorm room and snags a beer, or some random pedophile walking through campus kidnaps her. Well not really any of those situations as much as the giant lawsuit and media firestorm over how they didn't protect the young and precious snowflake.

Except her father offered to accompany her to class. So, he's taking responsibility for her welfare on campus.


I read that part. I still think the community college would still rather not take that chance.
 
2012-02-18 04:17:36 PM  
What i the worst that could happen?
13, pregnant and smoking crack
That's about the worst I can think of
Could be wrong though
 
2012-02-18 04:18:14 PM  

foxyshadis: It's hard to take AP courses when you're homeschooled, especially when you're of middle school age.


The only requirement for clep tests is to take and pass them. It doesn't matter if you learned the material at home or at a HS.
 
2012-02-18 04:20:26 PM  

hbk72777: People don't realize school isn't just for learning facts. You go to learn to work with others, deal with conflict, improve social skills etc. You move up more than 1 grade, the rest of your classmates have pubes and you're sitting there saying "Where's mine?" Everyone else went to the party the night before, you, you played Bobble and were in bed by 8. Yeah, you memorized the answers the night before every test in school , but now you're 20 years old in a work environment and your colleague on a project doesn't want to do it your way, you gonna call mommy? Will you have the skills to try to compromise? Or will you shut down and get stomped on?


Perhaps she relates better to the adult world because of her experiences. I was a traditional student and figured out real quick that my peers were idiots and my teachers merely babysitters. I never related to anyone until I entered a collegiate atmosphere. You assume that a kid naturally matures along a preset schedule, but that is entirely artificial. I never went through a "child" state despite being forced to pretend to or be put into the special ed classes with drooling idiots. On my own I was reading at a 10th grade level by 4th grade, but nearly held back because of my drawing skills in art class.

This orderly progression expected by our industrial pupil processing centers results in those who can, want and need higher standards being sidelined until they no longer care and spiral down into depression out of frustration. I'm not just talking about myself, but others who I've known who have had ambition and hope beaten out of them and not managed to overcome it yet.
 
2012-02-18 04:21:38 PM  
I like to wear my sister's "Class of '69 High School Reunion" t-shirt. When my friends question me about it, I tell them that I graduated when I was 9 years and 10 months old. Sometimes they actually believe it, before I tell them the truth.
 
2012-02-18 04:22:33 PM  
I was 16 when I started taking college classes (from the local jc) in high school.

I only wish now that all of my high school classes had been at the local JC.

Unlike high school, students at the JC want to be there.
 
2012-02-18 04:23:00 PM  
Education should not discriminate against anyone. If the person is ready for advanced subjects, then let them have it.

It's the parent's problem to tell her little kid not to engage in unprotected gang bangs though.
 
2012-02-18 04:25:25 PM  

Trance750: How about let the kids be kids, instead of pushing them to be adults, before their time.


To some kids, that could mean going to college at 12.
 
2012-02-18 04:26:45 PM  
This is where the free market should take place, if one college doesn't want to teach her, then another college will take the money.
 
2012-02-18 04:28:51 PM  

alternative girlfriend: Karac: "If she meets all the qualifications but for her age, then why not let her in?" her mother, Louise Racine, told the Orlando Sentinel in 2010. "What's the worst that can happen, honestly?"

I believe the school is thinking that the worst might be that she see's some other student watching porn, or she goes to study at a friends dorm room and snags a beer, or some random pedophile walking through campus kidnaps her. Well not really any of those situations as much as the giant lawsuit and media firestorm over how they didn't protect the young and precious snowflake.

Except her father offered to accompany her to class. So, he's taking responsibility for her welfare on campus.


And I can see the Dad being the professor's cop: "WHY DIDN'T SHE GET AN A? I WAS THERE!" Federal law prohibits the instructor from discussing matters with the parent, but how will that not happen when the Dad is right there in the freakin' classroom?
 
2012-02-18 04:28:55 PM  
CSS time:

Middle school damn near killed me, literally. Mom decides sending me to college full-time at 13 is better than 9th grade at a high school with the same kids. I take Geography 1 in Fall, score a B. Enroll in summer classes. Board of Directors says that dependent on my grades in summer, I would get permission. I got a C in Philosophy and a B in English, so they let me in.

Here's what I would tell parents:
1) Do NOT let your kids burn out. Because the summer courses and my spring semester of 8th grade overlapped, I was in school from Aug-Dec 96, then 4 weeks off, Jan-Jul of 97, two weeks off, and then Aug-Dec. I burnt out hard, starting ditching classes and doing other not so smart stuff. I was on the Dean's list and could have gotten guaranteed entry into UCLA by the time I was 16 had I stayed on track.

2) Regardless of whether or not you send your teenager to college, make sure the girls are prepped for boy attention. That was my biggest downfall, and combined with the burnout, made me a prime target for a predator. I accept my part of what happened, but if I'd been more prepared I'm sure things would have turned out differently.

Otherwise, best of luck for her. I hope she can find a place that is scholastically challenging enough but also allows her to develop socially at a suitable pace.
 
2012-02-18 04:30:38 PM  

MrFisher_84: Karac: "If she meets all the qualifications but for her age, then why not let her in?" her mother, Louise Racine, told the Orlando Sentinel in 2010. "What's the worst that can happen, honestly?"

I believe the school is thinking that the worst might be that she see's some other student watching porn, or she goes to study at a friends dorm room and snags a beer, or some random pedophile walking through campus kidnaps her. Well not really any of those situations as much as the giant lawsuit and media firestorm over how they didn't protect the young and precious snowflake.

It's a community college. There's no dorms.


What dorms in a community college might look like. (new window)
 
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