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(Slate)   Liberals shouldn't homeschool their children, because homeschooling is a mistake   (slate.com) divider line 550
    More: Obvious, religious fundamentalism, secular humanists, public sphere, Dana Goldstein, liberals, coordinator, mistakes  
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17802 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Feb 2012 at 5:37 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-19 02:18:38 AM

rebelyell2006: morgantx: So we homeschool and we get out in our community. We do our "core" curriculum as a combination of worksheets and Internet-based learning games & tests. We write letters to family members as a writing enrichment, and we read a LOT. As for socialization, the kids do Boy Scouts and Tae Kwon Do class in racially and economically-integrated groups. (If they were in public school, their Boy Scout troop would be based on their elementary school, so it would be as White and middle class as their school.) Their Tae Kwon Do class is about 40% white, 30% Hispanic, and 10% each Asian & Black. In addition, we love Mexican food & Asian food, so we frequently drive to the other end of town to visit the Mercado (Hispanic market) and the Asian market; as a result, they've learned smatterings of Spanish, Vietnamese, and Laotian. They can talk to people of all races & backgrounds because they're frequently surrounded by people of all races & backgrounds. They would NOT have that diversity in their local public school.

Unless you are from Bumfark, Georgia, (or Bumfark, Texas) you would not find a lack of diversity in public schools. That entire paragraph is just odd, unless of course you live in a town with 99% white non-Hispanic demographics.


I am from Texas and I cannot even think of a town that would have demographics like those described in that post. Even our local KKK haven has been "infiltrated" and has a rather large population of minorities nowadays (this delights all of us normal people).

As my mother put it when we built our new home, "Your subdivision is very multicultural." I had to remind her that since my husband is hispanic, her grandkids are --gasp-- minorities just like most of the rest of our neighborhood. Never pleases her to hear that. Can't get the Mississippi out if her even after fifty years....
 
2012-02-19 02:19:20 AM

Lsherm: RexTalionis: Lsherm: "the collective".

I just want to note, for your future reference, that periods and commas should be placed within the quotation marks.

That's an American rule (new window), imperialist :)


Hey RexTalionis,

I just wanted to thank you for taking this thread in an entirely different direction by being "grey" wrong. It warmed my heart to see you taken down by other people who knew different.

Perhaps you won't be so obnoxious next time, but I doubt it. You're clearly American.
 
2012-02-19 02:23:31 AM

RoyBatty: relcec: is it weird that I think it is weird that there is a random directory sitting out there with memes on it, oh and boobies?

Well, I have one too, except I call mine imgur, and I save to it, rehosting, images from photobucket or tinypic or other stuff that has a tendency to be swapped for [bandwidth exceeded].

I'm sure that's some farker's personal server.


stupid question. not sure why that struck me as odd at all.
 
2012-02-19 02:24:25 AM

sendtodave: Deedeemarz: We are well-off enough to have spoiled our kids. My daughter just got her first apartment with a roommate who was not raised like she was. Her roomie's parents worked hard but lived paycheck to paycheck (when things were going well) and she grew up poor. She calls my daughter "princess" which is a well-earned title. The roomie's truck wouldn't start one day and she needed a ride to work. My kid tells her to just call AAA and they will come get it and take it to the shop. My daughter had to learn to drink cheap coffee when her new "I'm independent" budget couldn't handle an $11/lb Starbucks habit. And get her hair done at TGF and do her own eyebrows--her roommate had never had her brows done.
This is a great experience for them both. Mine is learning about budgeting, making do, and a different style of life from ours; her friend is learning things like interview skills, how to do a resume, how to eat different foods (couldn't Believe my daughter had no idea what a FryDaddy was), how to study, etc.


They should make a wacky situation comedy about these girls.

Oh, wait, nevermind.


Lol. If it weren't so sad.....and hadn't been done a million times.....
 
2012-02-19 02:31:30 AM

Deedeemarz: I am from Texas and I cannot even think of a town that would have demographics like those described in that post. Even our local KKK haven has been "infiltrated" and has a rather large population of minorities nowadays (this delights all of us normal people).

As my mother put it when we built our new home, "Your subdivision is very multicultural." I had to remind her that since my husband is hispanic, her grandkids are --gasp-- minorities just like most of the rest of our neighborhood. Never pleases her to hear that. Can't get the Mississippi out if her even after fifty years....


Our town's segregation isn't really racial segregation; it's economic. Unfortunately, the way that our town is set up, race is often a determiner of economic status.
 
2012-02-19 03:05:58 AM

relcec: base935: Has anyone posted this yet?

[xxyr.com image 420x580]

what is that elway mouth picture about anyway? and whose directory is that?


xxyr.com
 
2012-02-19 03:24:03 AM
Morgantx, I like you. You can come back anytime.

/childless
//respects choices made through rational analysis
 
2012-02-19 03:27:52 AM

Lsherm: for their children in order to best serve "the collective".


For those of us who weren't homeschooled, WTF is the collective?
 
2012-02-19 03:48:57 AM

AnalogKid42: Lsherm: for their children in order to best serve "the collective".

For those of us who weren't homeschooled, WTF is the collective?


3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-02-19 04:26:54 AM

Lsherm: Could such a go-it-alone ideology ever be truly progressive-by which I mean, does homeschooling serve the interests not just of those who are doing it, but of society as a whole?

Well, it shouldn't shock anyone that an American liberal believes parents should forgo what is best for their children in order to best serve "the collective".


10/10. Made me smile, yo!
 
2012-02-19 04:52:28 AM
NO ROADS
 
2012-02-19 04:54:25 AM
I believe that home schooling can be as academically and socially as good as public or private schooling depending on the educational level of the parents and their ability to arrange social outings. However, there is one thing that worries me about home schooling is that the parent has to always be there. The ability to socialise with others is only half of the lesson, the other half is to socialise and to learn to behave in those environments without your parents being there. This having the parents there ALL THE TIME is also one of the main reasons I would never home school. I work and I like working and having my own income. I went to school and college to acquire the skills I need to work in my industry and I know if I took 18 years off I may as well say goodbye to a career and any earning potential above minimum wage. I wonder how many home schooling teachers are mums and how many of these mums will have taken themselves completely out of the workforce. I wonder how many will find when they decide they want to return in 18 to 20+ years with their out dated skills combined with ageism will ever find work again. I wonder how many of those will be living in poverty because of this.

Please think of the whole picture when you home school. I would never tell my daughter to try hard, aim for what she wants but then tell her that if she has children she must give it all up. Or work in a night job. No no no and I will not tell myself that.
 
2012-02-19 05:01:25 AM
raptakeover.com
 
2012-02-19 05:18:07 AM
Also relating to my previous post - I wonder how this increase in home schooling which means for many people an adult taking themselves out of the workforce will affect the economic future of the country.

Many I predict will not be able to survive on the remaining adult workers wage, especially in retirement. Thus will be a heavy burden upon our society.

As noted in the article public school not only educates children it also allows parents to work and thus pay tax. This tax goes towards our society and what the home schoolers save society in educational costs will not make up for what they will cost them in the long run with the benefits they will need in retirement.

Yes there are probably some home school teachers who can live off their partners wage and even some who can do so in retirement. However, the partner would have to earn a very high wage and most men don't do that. Oh I know I'm right about most home school teachers being women.

Men usually are not stupid enough to give up their economic earning potential, but you can sucker a woman to do anything if you tell her it's for the children.
 
2012-02-19 05:47:09 AM
So...

Oh, forget it. i'm not even going to bother.
 
2012-02-19 07:09:53 AM

Nancy Grace's Billowing Face Vents: rebelyell2006: Nancy Grace's Billowing Face Vents: lilplatinum: sendtodave: My point is that "school is supposed to suck, because life sucks" isn't exactly a great argument for public schools.

You could homeschool, and just beat your kids with a rubber hose now and then to achieve the same effect.

Then they would just learn about having to survive shiatty parents instead of learning how to survive shiatty peers.


I have difficulty believing shiatty parents would be interested in home schooling.

And yet so many shiatty parents choose to homeschool instead of letting their children learn about science.

I here you... I am an atheist-scientist.

But i think the formative years should be more about self-esteem. Getting that foundation can last a life time.

I was brought up in an abusive fundamentalist christian home.

Science and higher education easily and handily got the religion out of me.

MUCH harder to shore up the self-esteem.


the-big-bang-theory.com
 
2012-02-19 07:21:40 AM
Okay- so homeschooling, nowadays, is more like online college classes? Reason I'm curious is my wife's half-brothers are "homeschooled" by her stepmom, and who is an idiot. She's a stay-at-home mom with no college degree, doesn't understand simple economics and math, and is extremely judgemental of other cultures. I know the primary reason they're homeschooled is religious beliefs, but I just couldn't imagine what sort of things they could possibly learn from her that would be equivalent to what's taught in a public or private school.

For me, it was just college. My mom was well qualified to teach me until I turned 14. As soon as it was apparent that she couldn't do the material, it was off to community college for math and foreign language. For every bad example of homeschooling, there is a good one.

Related to that, what do you think would have been better for my development, High school, or community college? I didn't have to waste time "socializing" with idiot teenagers. I studied with older people, most of whom were working full time while getting their degree. I learned how to interact with adults, and that has paid dividends for me.
 
2012-02-19 08:15:20 AM
I see far too many arguments that start with "liberals shouldn't". Liberals shouldn't homeschool (let the conservative fundies do that). Liberals shouldn't rock the boat that is the democratic party and demand better policies (nevermind that the conservative counterparts at the republican party manage to consistently rock their boat and successfully move the center post further and further to the right).

I don't think homeschooling is harmful, so long as the parents are very involved and make sure their children are being socialized in other venues. It may require a full time job level of dedication, but if the time and desire is there, it can be done.

I think John Gatto makes a great case against conventional schooling.
 
2012-02-19 09:05:03 AM
This article is relevant to my interests. I don't have time to read all the comments, but I thought I'd put in my 2 cents.

I am a liberal and wife is a Republican. She does have some pretty lefty views for a Republican, though, so it works for us. My wife homeschools our daughter. Neither of us believe that homeschooling is for everyone. We're fortunate enough that I have a good job and we get an adoption subsidy, but even with that we barely make ends meet. You have to have a two parent family and one of you has to make enough income to support the family.

We adopted our daughter as an older child and she has learning disabilities due to prior neglect and abuse. We had her in public school for a year. In 5th grade she was reading on maybe a first grade level and she could barely add and subtract. The school had services for special education, but as our daughter had become a master of blending in with the crowd, the teachers didn't know until test time just how far behind she was. At the end of 5th grade they were going to pass her along to 6th grade. She had made some improvement, but not much. Her achievement test scores were still in the 1 percentile.

We decided that she was not ready to advance a grade level and held her back. This time, however, she was going to go through 5th grade at home. This takes an enormous amount of time and effort on my wife's part. We can't afford to buy prepackaged curriculum so she had to do her reasearch and make her own. Schooling our daughter is more than a full-time job.

I'll try to keep this story from getting much longer and just give you the current standings. My daughter is in 7th grade and is now taking algebra and Earth Science. She says she hates math, but does quite well at it. She is also a major science nerd. We go to the planetarium on a regular basis to catch the star shows. She's still not up to grade level in her reading and writing, but she is reading for leisure now, which she would never do when she first came home. We actually have to confiscate her books because she tries to stay up late to read them. It's pretty awesome.

She still has a lot to overcome, but homeschooling has definitely beef the right choice for us. It is not, however, the right choice for everyone. If you feel like you want to homeschool your children, do your research and be ready for some challenging work.

Also, you should know that homeschooling is extremely regulated in some states. Many people think homeschooling is not regulated at all, but that is not true. It just depends on where you live. For instance, if you live in Texas you pretty much just tell them you're homeschooling and that's it. However, if you live in Pennsylvania, the amount of hoops you have to jump through to be allowed to homeschool makes it so that you probably will either have to send your kids to public school or move out of state. In New York, my wife has to send quarterly progress reports and we have to do standardized testing every 2 years.

/whew that was a long post
//don't know what came over me
///proud papa of a homeschooled girl
 
2012-02-19 10:00:15 AM
The Department of Education is a mistake too.
 
2012-02-19 10:06:36 AM

rewind2846: sseye:

So, apparently, you do NOT know the difference between correlation and causation and that is not the limit of logical fallacies to which you succumb.

The world will therefore be better off ignoring your verbal diarrhea regarding pedagogy.

/still shut up

Must be one of those homeschooled kids... the ones without societal filters.
Apparently those filters don't extend to posts on FARK, either.

More's the pity.
/and good job with that thesaurus, dood
//could have just said "way to teach", but nooooo...


Still wrong about everything.

And that's the problem with vouchers. More people like you take the easy way out and go to troll school.
 
2012-02-19 10:16:06 AM

jshine: Kazan: homeschooling ... demonstrates a lack of trust in the education system.

My lack of trust in the education system comes from having gone through it myself. I wouldn't wish my experience on my progeny. Also, the wifey & I both have doctorates: there's about 20 years worth of university in the household, from undergrad through post-doc. I think we'd be up to the task of homeschooling a kid or two.


This, almost exactly (although I'm still ABD). I homeschooled our son for years until he got into a hippie, progressive school that shared our values and priorities.
 
2012-02-19 10:29:32 AM

neomiasma: We adopted our daughter as an older child and she has learning disabilities due to prior neglect and abuse.


Some mornings, you get a cup of coffee, check out fark, and you read something like this.

Even if nobody else notices, you are amazing. Just wow.
 
2012-02-19 11:10:54 AM

farkindood: Okay- so homeschooling, nowadays, is more like online college classes? Reason I'm curious is my wife's half-brothers are "homeschooled" by her stepmom, and who is an idiot. She's a stay-at-home mom with no college degree, doesn't understand simple economics and math, and is extremely judgemental of other cultures. I know the primary reason they're homeschooled is religious beliefs, but I just couldn't imagine what sort of things they could possibly learn from her that would be equivalent to what's taught in a public or private school.

For me, it was just college. My mom was well qualified to teach me until I turned 14. As soon as it was apparent that she couldn't do the material, it was off to community college for math and foreign language. For every bad example of homeschooling, there is a good one.

Related to that, what do you think would have been better for my development, High school, or community college? I didn't have to waste time "socializing" with idiot teenagers. I studied with older people, most of whom were working full time while getting their degree. I learned how to interact with adults, and that has paid dividends for me.


I remember reading somewhere (can't cite it off the top of my head) that a homeschool parent is not so much a teacher but a "learning facilitator". Part of the job of a homeschool parent is to find resources to help educate our children, and in doing that, we often pull from a wide variety of sources. We can find classes and curricula that are designed to allow the student to "self-teach", or correspondence courses (either online or through mail) that pair our children with experienced teachers. Homeschool co-ops will often have doctors teaching biology classes, lawyers teaching government classes, and people with MBAs teaching economics classes. Then there's community college (as you mentioned). There are resources in the community as well; if your child wants to learn a foreign language, you might be able to find a neighbor who speaks it and would be willing to teach it. The idea that the parent MUST teach every class is just not realistic, and in the VAST majority of homeschools (even those fundamentalist, isolationist homeschools), it's not accurate.
 
2012-02-19 11:30:05 AM
Guest:

In our case, I wouldn't be working outside the home anyways. I tried it back when my kids were in school, but since I have two with ADHD and one who's bipolar, I was getting called up to the school at least 3 times a week to deal with a problem. Nine times out of ten, the problem was that the teachers or faculty members were incapable of adhering to the behavior plans we had established. Getting the kids onto an IEP was a NIGHTMARE that took up MONTHS of my time with meetings, doctor's appointments, etc. And I was STILL expected to volunteer at the school on a regular basis (at least once every couple of weeks, or else the "room mother" would call me and give me a guilt trip about the poor teacher sacrificing everything for the kids, and then she would tell the OTHER mothers, and then they would say something in front of their kids, and then MY kid would give me a guilt trip about it). I worked as a paralegal, but I eventually had no choice but to quit because I just wasn't able to ensure my kids had a decent education AND give my employer the attention that his cases deserved.

And this seems to be at the crux of the issue: Should homeschoolers pull their children out of a bad school environment for homeschool, or should we simply make fighting the school system our full-time job? Because if we DON'T homeschool, we're supposed to be advocates for our children (ESPECIALLY if they're special needs) and we're SUPPOSED to be available to jump through the school's hoops no matter the cost. At one point, the school district told me that they would have to send my (bipolar) child to an "alternative" school. They shouldn't have done that because the behavior they were objecting to was covered in her IEP, but they said they were unable to keep her at the main campus. They didn't provide bussing, though, and the school they sent her to was on the other end of town; the cost of gas to get her to and from the school was $150 a month, and that inconvenience was in addition to the 30 minute (ONE WAY) commute to take her & pick her up. I've had them call me because of some behavior problem (that could've been prevented if they had followed the IEP) and tell me that I have to pick up my child; on one occasion, I told them, "I'm at work and I can't get away right now. It'll have to wait for a couple of hours," and they told me, "Either you send somebody to pick up your child or we're calling CPS." Their justification was that if I failed to drop everything to pick up my child from school, I was a negligent parent.

I understand your perspective, but not all of us have a hassle-free school that we can use for free child care. In some cases, the time required to deal with the school EXCEEDS the time spent homeschooling.
 
2012-02-19 12:08:17 PM

sseye:

Still wrong about everything.

And that's the problem with vouchers. More people like you take the easy way out and go to troll school.


You mean where you learned to post on forums such as this? Nahh, I skipped that one.
If you're not savvy enough to differentiate between "this is my experience" and "every one is like that and this is proof" after all your time here, then maybe you need to fire up a few more neurons and work on that.
That chip on your shoulder must be REALLY farking heavy.

Oh, and neener neener to you too.
 
2012-02-19 12:36:09 PM
Homeschooling can't be healthy psychologically.

Experience is when someone says "I was homeschooled" (for more than a year or so), the reaction is normally "that explains the crazy".


Learning to interact with people, and work in groups is one of the most important things about school... and you totally lack that home schooling.

No, your neighbor and your sibling don't count... there's nothing to working with the same 2 or 3 people over and over again.

Anyone who went to private or public school likely did group projects with 100+ (often many more) people over the 12 years before college. That's a huge lesson. And when you get a job... the most important one. Even a small school over 12 years has enough churn so you had 100+ classmates. Larger school and you had a class with several thousand students.


I suspect the private tutors and homeschooling also play a little role in child celebrities growing up to be as disturbed as they often are... if you noticed, the ones who grow up normal almost always attended high school... I suspect this correlation matters.

1:1 ratio can't be good for you long term. Life doesn't work that way.
 
2012-02-19 12:41:18 PM
Public schools are awesome if you want to learn what prison is like. Or learn about the Revolutionary War, Civil War, WWI and WWII on an endless loop for 12 years. But only in the most cursory way. (Apparently Franz Ferdinand was so beloved that 35 million had to die to avenge him). Economics consists of "War is awesome for the economy!" Math has nothing to do with real life and English is taught so that the people who are lucky enough to learn how to read and write actually hate doing so.

You're ass out if you want to learn about the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Panama, South and Central America. shiat, we learned NOTHING about the Ottoman Empire. It just sort of loomed there on the map and then it was gone. Logic and Rhetoric aren't taught. Black history month is a nice touch but when you cram it all into February without tying it to actual events in history, you forget it. Add a bunch of bullying teachers and students, many of whom are perverts and it's no wonder our schools are failing. The only school my kid will be attending is Montessori when he's very young. If he wants to attend public high school, fine. He'll have his own mind by then.

/My husband, the English major, will be teaching him grammar, etc.
 
2012-02-19 01:29:25 PM

rewind2846:
If you're not savvy enough to differentiate between "this is my experience" and "every one is like that and this is proof" after all your time here, then


since that's not what your original post said i'll let you walk that one back and slink away.
 
2012-02-19 01:32:10 PM

DIGITALgimpus: Homeschooling can't be healthy psychologically.

Experience is when someone says "I was homeschooled" (for more than a year or so), the reaction is normally "that explains the crazy".


Learning to interact with people, and work in groups is one of the most important things about school... and you totally lack that home schooling.

No, your neighbor and your sibling don't count... there's nothing to working with the same 2 or 3 people over and over again.

Anyone who went to private or public school likely did group projects with 100+ (often many more) people over the 12 years before college. That's a huge lesson. And when you get a job... the most important one. Even a small school over 12 years has enough churn so you had 100+ classmates. Larger school and you had a class with several thousand students.


I suspect the private tutors and homeschooling also play a little role in child celebrities growing up to be as disturbed as they often are... if you noticed, the ones who grow up normal almost always attended high school... I suspect this correlation matters.

1:1 ratio can't be good for you long term. Life doesn't work that way.


What kind of turnover do you have in your job where you have to work on group projects with 100+ different people? Maybe it's just a difference in employment, but when I was in the workforce, I was FREQUENTLY working with only 5 or fewer people on an ongoing basis and a smattering of others in a cursory capacity.

That being said, you make the same mistake that everybody else does about homeschooling: the assumption that homeschoolers never leave their home or interact with those outside of their families. The most recent studies show that the average homeschooler is involved in 3-4 activities outside the home: Scouting, 4-H, gymnastics, martial arts, choir, athletics, etc. In other words, homeschoolers are working with LOTS of other kids on an ongoing basis. But homeschoolers have an added advantage, in that they have opportunities to work with and interact with adults and people of all ages. I personally know several homeschoolers that volunteer to visit the elderly or the disabled in nursing homes, that work at homeless shelters or soup kitchens, or that volunteer at other community organizations. In those capacities, they're learning a lot more diverse social skills than what they would learn from being sequestered with a group of children their same age, race, and socio-economic status.

And your experience with group projects was not universal. I was the geek, and I cared about my grade. So whenever we were assigned to work in groups (in school), I would tell my group, "I don't want your help because you're going to screw it up and bring down my grade. So how about I do the project and you guys can look busy and get an easy A?" I never had anybody turn me down. My point here is that all those "group projects" never made me good at working in groups! They only made me despise the idiots I was surrounded with and do everything I could to keep them from farking up my own efforts to make the top 10 in my class. Is that the lesson we're supposed to learn? To give idiots something to make them look busy and keep them from farking things up?
 
2012-02-19 01:57:08 PM

morgantx: And your experience with group projects was not universal. I was the geek, and I cared about my grade. So whenever we were assigned to work in groups (in school), I would tell my group, "I don't want your help because you're going to screw it up and bring down my grade. So how about I do the project and you guys can look busy and get an easy A?" I never had anybody turn me down. My point here is that all those "group projects" never made me good at working in groups! They only made me despise the idiots I was surrounded with and do everything I could to keep them from farking up my own efforts to make the top 10 in my class. Is that the lesson we're supposed to learn? To give idiots something to make them look busy and keep them from farking things up?



this.
 
2012-02-19 03:23:20 PM

SuperTramp: culebraSo you're concerned about America "going to hell" but you'll go ahead and promote media sensationalism regarding exceptions to the rule?

My bet is that Chimpasaurus spent most of the day alone, with the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue.


Since I'm a female, I bet my husband would love if I did.

Culebra: I'd hardly call those stories "media sensationalism." Most of those stories are not mainstream news and hardly anyone I know has even heard of or can believe those things. You can't deny the fact that the "food police" are in quite a large number of schools. You also can't deny that there are dozens of cases of social services nosing into perfectly healthy families. And where do social services usually get tipped off? School.

I know that not every single school in America has the gestapo managing it, but there are far too many for my liking. My mother-in-law is a teacher, and we can already see how dictatorial a lot of the schools (including hers) are becoming.

I bet you're the kind of guy who thinks the TSA is protecting us and all the concerned people are subject to media propaganda.
 
2012-02-19 04:32:20 PM
Homeschooling. What are the parents trying to do?

1. Ensure their child progresses well. Jeez, haven't you heard of helping with homework? Or getting tutoring when the material is too complicated?

2. The local school is shiate, and private schools are too expensive. Yes this can happen, and I'd agree with this reason.

3. Playground bullying. If the child is being pulled out of school if this is happening, and if it has happened at a couple of schools, then yes. If the child is being pulled out of school because the parent is worried it might happen, there's something wrong with the parent's statistical reasoning. They probably refused to vaccinate their child as well.

4. The parent does not like what is taught at school. Because they teach socialism, environmentalism, secularism, evolution, different food choices. Derp. Derp. Derp.

5. The parent doesn't want the child to mix with undesirable types. This is the most insidious harm you can do to someone: Reducing their experiences with other types of people.

6. They have the money and the means to do it (e.g., a parent who isn't working, the family can get by on one fulltime income). Well, good for you.

Where I come from, public schools are good. Why? Because the committed and wealthy parents in the local community are still contributing to the running and fund raising for the schools. Because the Principals and teachers get the support from their parents.

And why is this good to have decent public schooling? Apart from the fact that all kids get a decent education? Because everyone in the country grows up having a shared experience, increases egalitarianism, and discourages the fracturing of society into stratas based on wealth, politics or creed.

But at least it looks like the US is going to get its very own homeschooling Presidential candidate, and that must be nice.
 
2012-02-19 04:53:53 PM

schubie: You're ass out if you want to learn about the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Panama, South and Central America. shiat, we learned NOTHING about the Ottoman Empire. It just sort of loomed there on the map and then it was gone. Logic and Rhetoric aren't taught.


I learned everything on this list at the public school I went to, which I consider an adequate but not very good school. Just saying. I admit that the logic and rhetoric stuff was part of an elective.
 
2012-02-19 06:07:33 PM

ansius: Homeschooling. What are the parents trying to do?

1. Ensure their child progresses well. Jeez, haven't you heard of helping with homework? Or getting tutoring when the material is too complicated?

2. The local school is shiate, and private schools are too expensive. Yes this can happen, and I'd agree with this reason.

3. Playground bullying. If the child is being pulled out of school if this is happening, and if it has happened at a couple of schools, then yes. If the child is being pulled out of school because the parent is worried it might happen, there's something wrong with the parent's statistical reasoning. They probably refused to vaccinate their child as well.

4. The parent does not like what is taught at school. Because they teach socialism, environmentalism, secularism, evolution, different food choices. Derp. Derp. Derp.

5. The parent doesn't want the child to mix with undesirable types. This is the most insidious harm you can do to someone: Reducing their experiences with other types of people.

6. They have the money and the means to do it (e.g., a parent who isn't working, the family can get by on one fulltime income). Well, good for you.

Where I come from, public schools are good. Why? Because the committed and wealthy parents in the local community are still contributing to the running and fund raising for the schools. Because the Principals and teachers get the support from their parents.

And why is this good to have decent public schooling? Apart from the fact that all kids get a decent education? Because everyone in the country grows up having a shared experience, increases egalitarianism, and discourages the fracturing of society into stratas based on wealth, politics or creed.

But at least it looks like the US is going to get its very own homeschooling Presidential candidate, and that must be nice.


My parents home-schooled me because the teacher, at least as I was told, wanted to put me in special education so she should get another aide. Looking at the person I am today, I can't help but wonder if my parents didn't understand what "autism" was.
 
2012-02-19 06:46:29 PM
So many of you fail to realize that helping the "collective" generally helps your crotchfruit. A well-educated society has a better quality of life.

If you really have an issue with your child's education, help out at his school and work with him outside of class. It's not an all-or-nothing proposition. It takes a village to raise a child.
 
2012-02-19 07:11:32 PM

The First Four Black Sabbath Albums: So many of you fail to realize that helping the "collective" generally helps your crotchfruit. A well-educated society has a better quality of life.

If you really have an issue with your child's education, help out at his school and work with him outside of class. It's not an all-or-nothing proposition. It takes a village to raise a child.


So many of you (do you love your sweeping generalizations and cling to them because they are comfy?) fail to realize that others understand your arguments, yes they do, and have come to different conclusions regarding what is best for their kids, or for society, or the relative priorities. And so many of you, fail to realize or honor or respect all of the efforts people who disagree with you put into all the things you tell them they must do. Because if they disagree with you, they must just be "so many of you".

It's pretty farking arrogant of you to assume that none of these people who support home schooling in any way, when their kids are in a public school are not helping the kids outside of class or helping out at school.

They get that. Do you spend any time whatsoever getting what they have to say? Because the way you're so quick to categorize them, it sure doesn't sound like it.
 
2012-02-19 10:17:02 PM

ansius: Homeschooling. What are the parents trying to do?

1. Ensure their child progresses well. Jeez, haven't you heard of helping with homework? Or getting tutoring when the material is too complicated?

2. The local school is shiate, and private schools are too expensive. Yes this can happen, and I'd agree with this reason.

3. Playground bullying. If the child is being pulled out of school if this is happening, and if it has happened at a couple of schools, then yes. If the child is being pulled out of school because the parent is worried it might happen, there's something wrong with the parent's statistical reasoning. They probably refused to vaccinate their child as well.

4. The parent does not like what is taught at school. Because they teach socialism, environmentalism, secularism, evolution, different food choices. Derp. Derp. Derp.

5. The parent doesn't want the child to mix with undesirable types. This is the most insidious harm you can do to someone: Reducing their experiences with other types of people.

6. They have the money and the means to do it (e.g., a parent who isn't working, the family can get by on one fulltime income). Well, good for you.

Where I come from, public schools are good. Why? Because the committed and wealthy parents in the local community are still contributing to the running and fund raising for the schools. Because the Principals and teachers get the support from their parents.

And why is this good to have decent public schooling? Apart from the fact that all kids get a decent education? Because everyone in the country grows up having a shared experience, increases egalitarianism, and discourages the fracturing of society into stratas based on wealth, politics or creed.

But at least it looks like the US is going to get its very own homeschooling Presidential candidate, and that must be nice.


That won't happen. The more he speaks, the more eyes are opened. I applaud his desire to spout silliness in public. It just increases the odds of him going under.
 
2012-02-19 10:20:52 PM

sendtodave: lilplatinum: Homeschooling is a form of child abuse.

Hitting your children is child abuse. Yelling at and insulting your children is child abuse. Neglecting your children is child abuse.

Sending your children to a place where they will be hit, yelled at, insulted, and neglected? That's socialization.


Yes, all schools are just like that... and it happens to all the children. All the time. Everywhere. Yes.
Oh, you forgot 'Molested', and 'exposed to drugs' in your little ditty.
 
2012-02-19 11:25:52 PM

FubarBDilligaf: Forgot_my_password_again: Don't Teach Your Children. The World Needs Republicans.

Yet of those without HS diplomas, 66% voted for Obama. In fact, in the last 5 elections, the majority of the 'uneducated' voted Democrat every time. Let me guess how you voted...


Ba-Zing
 
2012-02-19 11:43:01 PM

RoyBatty: sweeping generalizations


agileproductdesign.com
 
2012-02-19 11:53:51 PM

The First Four Black Sabbath Albums: RoyBatty: sweeping generalizations

[agileproductdesign.com image 330x282]

So many of you fail to realize


citation needed.

How do you know what these people that disagree with you realize?

You are stereotyping, and making gross sweeping generalizations.
 
2012-02-20 12:01:05 AM

santadog: sendtodave: lilplatinum: Homeschooling is a form of child abuse.

Hitting your children is child abuse. Yelling at and insulting your children is child abuse. Neglecting your children is child abuse.

Sending your children to a place where they will be hit, yelled at, insulted, and neglected? That's socialization.

Yes, all schools are just like that... and it happens to all the children. All the time. Everywhere. Yes.
Oh, you forgot 'Molested', and 'exposed to drugs' in your little ditty.


You're right. It doesn't happen to the popular kids.
 
2012-02-20 12:53:29 AM

DavidVincent: Kazan: homeschooling isolates your kids from experiences that would help them understand other people and develop a sense of community and compassion.

[i52.tinypic.com image 345x333]


Bad things happen in the real world. Shouldn't the sheltered snowflake figure that out at an age when the bad guy lacks the capacity to kill him and destroy everything he's ever known.
 
2012-02-20 01:10:29 AM

homeschooled: [fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net image 604x430]

I'M TIRED OF ALL THE EMAIL NOTIFICATION SAYING YOU MOTHER F*CKERS ARE MENTIONING ME IN HERE SO I CAME TO SPEAK MY MIND.

As someone that was homeschooled, along with my brother and sister, I find it hilarious that all of you people are making these judgments because you've met some socially awkward homeschoolers and are all of the sudden experts. Here's what you don't realize.....you've also met a lot of normal homeschooled kids. You just don't know it, because those of us that are normal usually don't tell people we were homeschooled, because the second you tell someone you were homeschooled they're all ZOMG ARE YOUR PARENTS CRAZY OMG I BET THAT WAS SO WEIRD and treat you differently. And make obnoxious jokes.

Homeschooling, if done correctly, involves socialization. I had a co-op group with other families that homeschooled their kids. I did my homework every day like normal kids.... but also (on a weekly basis) went horseback riding, took pottery classes, played organized sports every season, took swimming lessons and gymnastics, went skiing in the winters every week, went on educational field trips........ we even put on plays sometimes. It was fun. I had a very good experience homeschooling my kids. And, contrary to what most people think, homeschooling involves the parents very little. I taught myself almost everything. Every text book teaches you how to do stuff very well. All you had to do is read it. When I'd get stuck, my mom would help me. You don't need a teaching degree to homeschool your kids.

You might think homeschooling is bad, but that's because a lot of the people that homeschool their kids are doing it for the wrong reasons. They're doing it because they're afraid of their kids being exposed to the "real world" so they shelter them. THAT is what creates a f*cked up kid. Normal parents who want their kids to have a good education and do what's best for them while they're homeschooled by getting them i ...


We're not mentioning you, we're mentioning people who are "homeschooled"... I can understand why you would misunderstand when you use a noun for your username... and education was homeschool... :)
 
2012-02-20 01:28:07 AM

brianbankerus: We're not mentioning you, we're mentioning people who are "homeschooled"... I can understand why you would misunderstand when you use a noun for your username... and education was homeschool... :)


That's an adjective.
 
2012-02-20 01:35:47 AM

LoneWolf343: brianbankerus: We're not mentioning you, we're mentioning people who are "homeschooled"... I can understand why you would misunderstand when you use a noun for your username... and education was homeschool... :)

That's an adjective.


That doesn't make me look smrt. :(
 
2012-02-20 04:19:26 AM
Let's face it, homeschooled kids are the weird ones of the block. Kind of like the ones whose parents won't let them watch TV.

And here's a new meme, Homeschooled Harold.

"Homeschool Harold has a lot to learn about the world. If only he was allowed to go further than the front yard."

s3-ak.buzzfed.com

s3-ak.buzzfed.com

s3-ak.buzzfed.com

More here
 
2012-02-20 07:41:39 PM

The First Four Black Sabbath Albums: So many of you fail to realize that helping the "collective" generally helps your crotchfruit. A well-educated society has a better quality of life.

If you really have an issue with your child's education, help out at his school and work with him outside of class. It's not an all-or-nothing proposition. It takes a village to raise a child.


You never help your child by having him or her indoctrinated by "the collective."
 
2012-02-21 04:22:19 PM

LoneWolf343: santadog: sendtodave: lilplatinum: Homeschooling is a form of child abuse.

Hitting your children is child abuse. Yelling at and insulting your children is child abuse. Neglecting your children is child abuse.

Sending your children to a place where they will be hit, yelled at, insulted, and neglected? That's socialization.

Yes, all schools are just like that... and it happens to all the children. All the time. Everywhere. Yes.
Oh, you forgot 'Molested', and 'exposed to drugs' in your little ditty.

You're right. It doesn't happen to the popular kids.


I was far far far away from being popular.
I think I was in 2nd grade, and someone called me a Nazi because my mother was born in Germany.

THE HORROR!

And once, someone made fun of me while working with clay because my dirty hands made the clay discolor.

How the hell did I make it thru life??

Yeah, bad shiat happens to people.. to everyone. And it's not limited to public school.
I was molested by a neighbor at the age of 6.


I guess what need to be done is do away public schools, and neighbors.
 
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