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(NFL)   Jeremy Lin's success reminds us of why the NFL is so great   (nfl.com) divider line 154
    More: Stupid, Jeremy Lin, NFL, Patrick Peterson, Julio Jones, DeMarco Murray, Rob Gronkowski, footwork, Peyton Hillis  
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6422 clicks; posted to Sports » on 17 Feb 2012 at 11:08 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-17 10:14:20 AM  
Jeremy Lin is a once a week sport that caters to American's lack of attention span, love of drinking, television, misplaced machismo, and an institutional need to put grown men through the grinder so that they die at a young age with the brain power of a 4 year old?
 
2012-02-17 10:39:51 AM  
That article is rubbish.
 
2012-02-17 10:59:52 AM  
What point is the article trying to make? I'm genuinely confused.
 
2012-02-17 11:06:26 AM  
WTF am I reading?
 
2012-02-17 11:14:22 AM  
Articles like this are why Hunter S. Thompson blew his brains out in the month of February.
 
2012-02-17 11:16:06 AM  
FIVE!
FIVE Lin greenlights today! Ah ah ah!
 
2012-02-17 11:24:36 AM  
FTL: In the NFL, if you're a star, we'll find you no matter where you play... This is because any market can win a championship. It's how the league is set up. You can go from 5-11 to the Super Bowl.

It's true: ANY team in the NFL can go from obscurity to Super Bowl Champion overnight.

... except the San Diego Chargers.

\ BOOM! :D
 
2012-02-17 11:26:58 AM  
The NFL is the least diverse sports league in America.

The NHL is full of Canadians and Europeans. Players from a dozen countries speaking a half-dozen different languages.

MLB is full of Latinos from the Caribbean and Venezuela, as well as players from Japan, Taiwan, and other Pacific Rim countries.

The NBA has had an infusion of Europeans and is growing like crazy in China and elsewhere in Europe, as epitomized by Yao Ming and others.

The NFL, by contrast, has basically no diversity. 99.9% of the players come from one country, one culture, and speak the same language. Aside from the occasional Aussie kicker or something, basically all the players are Americans.
 
2012-02-17 11:27:18 AM  
When he went on a rant about small market teams doing nothing in the NBA, did he forget San Antonio exists?
 
2012-02-17 11:27:59 AM  
What unLinteresting reading. I understand the writer misses football, but dear god was that article a stretch.
 
2012-02-17 11:29:26 AM  
Okay then.
 
2012-02-17 11:32:40 AM  

The Bestest: FIVE!
FIVE Lin greenlights today! Ah ah ah!


You mean five Linlights.....
 
2012-02-17 11:35:13 AM  

DubyaHater: What unLinteresting reading. I understand the writer misses football, but dear god was that article a stretch.


He writes for NFL.com. Of course he has to stretch for material in this time of the year.

/ What a silly article.
 
2012-02-17 11:35:52 AM  
FTL: In the NFL, if you're a star, we'll find you no matter where you play... This is because any market can win a championship. It's how the league is set up. You can go from 5-11 to the Super Bowl.

Yeah, except MLB has even more Championship parity (The highest from all US Sports)
 
2012-02-17 11:36:32 AM  
It's the exact opposite. NFL players are interchangeable faceless grunts besides the quarterback. They wear helmets. There are so many of them on the field and one player doesn't have as much impact on a game as in basketball. It's much harder to be recognized for your talent and you can get cut at any time. The article itself is barely coherent.
 
2012-02-17 11:37:54 AM  
Tiger Woods failure reminds us of why women's flat-track roller derby is so great.
 
2012-02-17 11:39:57 AM  
The guys point is that the whole Lin thing is basically because he is playing in NY, and that in the NFL, you can play on their teams like Green Bay and Jacksonville and still get star power. One, nobody on Jacksonville has every really been a top level "NFL Star"... two, the Green Bay Packers are an anomaly of the "small market" team stereotype in sports, because of their history, they have a national following despite playing in a city of 150,000. So, that is why Aaron Rodgers is a star there.

Then he goes into "But there's no one of the opinion that Lin isn't good."... which, while maybe technically true, there are plenty of analysts that do point out he turns the ball over too much, and a few other flaws. But (much like Tebow which is what he won't admit) when you win games, flaws are overlooked.

Back to the first point though, there is something to be said for the NBA being too "Top team" heavy. Case in point, here are the number of different teams that have won championships in the various sports since 1990 (MLB & NHL have a season lost for each of them in the time span tho):

NFL (13): Giants (3), Dallas (3), New England(3), Green Bay (2), Denver (2), Pittsburgh (2), Baltimore, St. Louis, San Fran, Washington, Tampa Bay, Indianapolis, New Orleans
MLB (13): Yankees (5), Florida (2), Toronto (2), Boston(2), St Louis (2), Minnesota, Cincy, Atlanta, Arizona, Anaheim, White Sox, Philadelphia, San Francisco
NHL (13): Detroit (4), Pittsburgh (3), New Jersey (3), Colorado (2), Montreal, Edmonton, Rangers, Dallas, Tampa Bay, Carolina, Anaheim, Chicago, Boston
NBA (8): Chicago (6), Lakers (5), San Antonio (4), Houston (2), Detroit (2), Miami, Boston, Dallas

If you can back another decade to 1980, you can add another 2 NFL Teams (Raiders, Bears), 6 MLB teams, 2 NHL teams, but, only the 76ers added to the NBA.

Another way of looking at it... percentage of teams in league that have never won a league title:
NBA: 13/30 (43%)
NHL: 13/30 (43%)
MLB: 8/30 (26%)
NFL: 7/32 (21%)
 
2012-02-17 11:43:59 AM  
five headlines about this guy before noon...
really?
 
2012-02-17 11:47:53 AM  

Mike_LowELL: What point is the article trying to make? I'm genuinely confused.


I was too- he doesn't come right out and say it, (and he should since his point is so muddled) but I gathered that he meant that in the NFL, there are many "breakout" players every year- young, new guys who over the course of a season, become household names and key parts of the franchise they play for- the same isn't as true in the NBA, where you might have one or two new "star" players emerge over the course of the season across the entire league. I don't follow basketball that much, but the only "new" stars I can recall out of recent seasons are Blake Griffin and Rajon (sp?) Rondo. I suppose you could throw Derrick Rose in there too. Either way, his point is that the number of "new" people is greater in the NFL than the NBA every year.

(Can't imagine why that would be- there totally aren't rosters 3x as large, injury rates that are much higher, and far more specialization at skill positions, as well as a much much shorter average career in the NFL than the NBA. I noticed he doesn't mention any of those points.)
 
2012-02-17 11:54:26 AM  
Soooooo...... Jeremy Lin > Tim Tebow?

Are we still doing that?
 
2012-02-17 12:02:21 PM  
If the author thinks so highly of the NFL, you'd think he would be aware that "overnight sensation" Tim Tebow went to an SEC school, won a Heisman, won a national championship and was a first-round pick. Or that Peyton Hillis is a four-year veteran.

Come to think of it, on the latter point is pretty hilarious. He uses Tebow to illustrate that NFL fans are aware of places like Denver. And then he mentions Hillis in the context of discussing the 2010 draft class, seemingly oblivious to the two years Hillis had previously played in... um, yeah.
 
2012-02-17 12:05:53 PM  

grinding_journalist: (Can't imagine why that would be- there totally aren't rosters 3x as large, injury rates that are much higher, and far more specialization at skill positions, as well as a much much shorter average career in the NFL than the NBA. I noticed he doesn't mention any of those points.)


That's because he's kind of a moron. Of course there are more breakout players each year in the NFL...there are more NEW players period every year, what with the size of the rosters and player turnover.
 
2012-02-17 12:06:15 PM  

dletter: Case in point, here are the number of different teams that have won championships in the various sports since 1990 (MLB & NHL have a season lost for each of them in the time span tho):

NFL (13): Giants (3)


Thank you.
 
2012-02-17 12:14:40 PM  

Super Chronic: If the author thinks so highly of the NFL, you'd think he would be aware that "overnight sensation" Tim Tebow went to an SEC school, won a Heisman, won a national championship and was a first-round pick. Or that Peyton Hillis is a four-year veteran.

Come to think of it, on the latter point is pretty hilarious. He uses Tebow to illustrate that NFL fans are aware of places like Denver. And then he mentions Hillis in the context of discussing the 2010 draft class, seemingly oblivious to the two years Hillis had previously played in... um, yeah.


"Peyton traded for Brady" was the greatest troll headline in Sports Tab history.
 
2012-02-17 12:17:31 PM  

Doc Daneeka: The NFL is the least diverse sports league in America.

The NHL is full of Canadians and Europeans. Players from a dozen countries speaking a half-dozen different languages.

MLB is full of Latinos from the Caribbean and Venezuela, as well as players from Japan, Taiwan, and other Pacific Rim countries.

The NBA has had an infusion of Europeans and is growing like crazy in China and elsewhere in Europe, as epitomized by Yao Ming and others.

The NFL, by contrast, has basically no diversity. 99.9% of the players come from one country, one culture, and speak the same language. Aside from the occasional Aussie kicker or something, basically all the players are Americans.


Tell that to Tom Brady as he's running away from the Ugandan Mathias Kiwanuka and the British-Nigerian Osi Umenyiora in the Super Bowl. I'm not disagreeing that there's less national-origin diversity in the NFL than in other sports, but 99.9% is an exaggeration. In any event, obviously any lack of diversity is due to American football not being played in other countries. And through all of this, I'm also kind of wondering why I'm supposed to care where the players come from.
 
2012-02-17 12:22:28 PM  

Super Chronic: Tell that to Tom Brady as he's running away from the Ugandan Mathias Kiwanuka and the British-Nigerian Osi Umenyiora in the Super Bowl.


Also, whatever planet produced the superior being known as Jason Pierre-Paul. He is most definitely not human.
 
2012-02-17 12:25:53 PM  

Super Chronic: Doc Daneeka: The NFL is the least diverse sports league in America.

The NHL is full of Canadians and Europeans. Players from a dozen countries speaking a half-dozen different languages.

MLB is full of Latinos from the Caribbean and Venezuela, as well as players from Japan, Taiwan, and other Pacific Rim countries.

The NBA has had an infusion of Europeans and is growing like crazy in China and elsewhere in Europe, as epitomized by Yao Ming and others.

The NFL, by contrast, has basically no diversity. 99.9% of the players come from one country, one culture, and speak the same language. Aside from the occasional Aussie kicker or something, basically all the players are Americans.

Tell that to Tom Brady as he's running away from the Ugandan Mathias Kiwanuka and the British-Nigerian Osi Umenyiora in the Super Bowl. I'm not disagreeing that there's less national-origin diversity in the NFL than in other sports, but 99.9% is an exaggeration. In any event, obviously any lack of diversity is due to American football not being played in other countries. And through all of this, I'm also kind of wondering why I'm supposed to care where the players come from.


Umenyiora WAS born in London and lived part of his youth in Nigeria, however Mathias was born and raised in the middle of Fat Hump Land (Indy). His (likely) twice weekly visit to Steak and Shake negates any Ugandan influence he may have had.
 
2012-02-17 12:26:58 PM  
Another Fark thread for Asian Tebow?
 
2012-02-17 12:32:45 PM  
Is the NoFunLeague getting jealous of other people having fun in their respective sports?
 
2012-02-17 12:33:33 PM  

Moopy Mac: Umenyiora WAS born in London and lived part of his youth in Nigeria, however Mathias was born and raised in the middle of Fat Hump Land (Indy). His (likely) twice weekly visit to Steak and Shake negates any Ugandan influence he may have had.


Jeremy Lin was born in LA and grew up in Palo Alto.
 
2012-02-17 12:35:31 PM  
But first things first. Comparisons of Lin to Tim Tebow are completely inaccurate.

Probably right. Lin hasn't inspired legions of people who rarely watch his game to flood message boards with "HE JUST WINS" comments.
 
2012-02-17 12:36:58 PM  

p the boiler: When he went on a rant about small market teams doing nothing in the NBA, did he forget San Antonio exists?


You have to admit that SA is pretty much the exception to the rule there. They had to land a once in a century player like Tim Duncan (Rare not only for his talent, but for his commitment to his franchise i.e. no 'taking his talents' elsewhere at the first opportunity) to do what they did.
 
2012-02-17 12:44:44 PM  

Doc Daneeka: The NFL is the least diverse sports league in America.

The NHL is full of Canadians and Europeans. Players from a dozen countries speaking a half-dozen different languages.

MLB is full of Latinos from the Caribbean and Venezuela, as well as players from Japan, Taiwan, and other Pacific Rim countries.

The NBA has had an infusion of Europeans and is growing like crazy in China and elsewhere in Europe, as epitomized by Yao Ming and others.

The NFL, by contrast, has basically no diversity. 99.9% of the players come from one country, one culture, and speak the same language. Aside from the occasional Aussie kicker or something, basically all the players are Americans.


How you figure? I'd Say Asians (at least Asian Pacific Islanders) are very well represented in the NFL:
In recent years, it has been estimated that a Samoan male (either an American Samoan, or a Samoan living in the 50 United States) is anywhere from 40 to 56 times more likely to play in the NFL than a non-Samoan American.
 
2012-02-17 12:44:55 PM  

The Homer Tax: p the boiler: When he went on a rant about small market teams doing nothing in the NBA, did he forget San Antonio exists?

You have to admit that SA is pretty much the exception to the rule there. They had to land a once in a century player like Tim Duncan (Rare not only for his talent, but for his commitment to his franchise i.e. no 'taking his talents' elsewhere at the first opportunity) to do what they did.


They also got Duncan when they still had a productive David Robinson.
 
2012-02-17 12:46:23 PM  

Yanks_RSJ: Super Chronic: Tell that to Tom Brady as he's running away from the Ugandan Mathias Kiwanuka and the British-Nigerian Osi Umenyiora in the Super Bowl.

Also, whatever planet produced the superior being known as Jason Pierre-Paul. He is most definitely not human.


I b'leve Pierre-Paul is Haitian, or so they said during the superbowl when they showed the blind father who raised him
 
2012-02-17 12:48:13 PM  

Yanks_RSJ: Also, whatever planet produced the superior being known as Jason Pierre-Paul. He is most definitely not human.


I'm guessing his Haitian immigrant parents have some magic elixir potion thingy. Voodoo; the new player development program for the NFL.
 
2012-02-17 12:50:15 PM  

p the boiler: When he went on a rant about small market teams doing nothing in the NBA, did he forget San Antonio exists?


Just keep underestimating the Spurs. Let them keep flying under the radar, and ignore the fact that they've brought in some really good young talent.

//Bwa ha ha.
 
2012-02-17 12:57:32 PM  

grinding_journalist: I was too- he doesn't come right out and say it, (and he should since his point is so muddled) but I gathered that he meant that in the NFL, there are many "breakout" players every year- young, new guys who over the course of a season, become household names and key parts of the franchise they play for- the same isn't as true in the NBA, where you might have one or two new "star" players emerge over the course of the season across the entire league. I don't follow basketball that much, but the only "new" stars I can recall out of recent seasons are Blake Griffin and Rajon (sp?) Rondo. I suppose you could throw Derrick Rose in there too. Either way, his point is that the number of "new" people is greater in the NFL than the NBA every year.


Which is precisely the reason that I'm so sick of the National Football League. The fact that the Jeremy Lin story never ever happens in the National Basketball League is what makes it so interesting, the same reason that people flip their shiat when an eight seed wins out in the first round, the reason people were stunned that a three-seed with fifty-seven wins won the title after perennially underachieving for the four years prior. Yeah, the NBA has some issues with its competitive balance, its salary structure, and the ability for its best players to pursue larger markets and make that competitive balance worse. But when this stuff happens in the NBA, it actually means something. The NFL is so unpredictable that it's actually become boring. Every single year, a bad team grossly overachieves, star players emerge out of nowhere (often to disappear as fast), there's a huge upset in the playoffs, and there's a bunch of "NFL experts" (in a league supposedly predicated on the idea that any team can win on any Sunday) wondering "WHO WOULDA THOT THIS CULD EVAR HAPPEN!?" And all the while, football fans complain about the design of the NBA, with its star players who get star treatment, and don't realize the NFL rule set has been almost exclusively designed to cater towards marketable passing quarterbacks, a rule set that has broken the balance of the game at the highest levels. It's manufactured narrative, it's manufactured bullshiat. It becomes boring once you catch on to it.
 
2012-02-17 01:02:55 PM  

The Homer Tax: p the boiler: When he went on a rant about small market teams doing nothing in the NBA, did he forget San Antonio exists?

You have to admit that SA is pretty much the exception to the rule there. They had to land a once in a century player like Tim Duncan (Rare not only for his talent, but for his commitment to his franchise i.e. no 'taking his talents' elsewhere at the first opportunity) to do what they did.


Stranger still, they managed to do it twice.

i.a.cnn.net
 
2012-02-17 01:12:25 PM  

Yanks_RSJ: NFL (13): Giants (3)

Thank you.



^This^
 
2012-02-17 01:12:28 PM  

Mike_LowELL: What point is the article trying to make? I'm genuinely confused.


Someone has hikacked your account.
 
2012-02-17 01:16:00 PM  

stebain: Mike_LowELL: What point is the article trying to make? I'm genuinely confused.

Someone has hikacked your account.


FUKIN RACHEL BAKER FROM FOURTH PERIDO GYM CLASS I NO IT'S YOU GET THE HELL OFF MY ACOUNT BEFORE I TELL EVERYONE ABUOT YOU'RE FAKE EYELASHES
 
2012-02-17 01:22:34 PM  
He does have a point. LeBron didn't get any publicity or attention at all in Cleveland. Only when he went to Miami did fans "find" him.
 
2012-02-17 01:23:41 PM  

Mike_LowELL: What point is the article trying to make? I'm genuinely confused.


Mike_LowELL: grinding_journalist: I was too- he doesn't come right out and say it, (and he should since his point is so muddled) but I gathered that he meant that in the NFL, there are many "breakout" players every year- young, new guys who over the course of a season, become household names and key parts of the franchise they play for- the same isn't as true in the NBA, where you might have one or two new "star" players emerge over the course of the season across the entire league. I don't follow basketball that much, but the only "new" stars I can recall out of recent seasons are Blake Griffin and Rajon (sp?) Rondo. I suppose you could throw Derrick Rose in there too. Either way, his point is that the number of "new" people is greater in the NFL than the NBA every year.

Which is precisely the reason that I'm so sick of the National Football League. The fact that the Jeremy Lin story never ever happens in the National Basketball League is what makes it so interesting, the same reason that people flip their shiat when an eight seed wins out in the first round, the reason people were stunned that a three-seed with fifty-seven wins won the title after perennially underachieving for the four years prior. Yeah, the NBA has some issues with its competitive balance, its salary structure, and the ability for its best players to pursue larger markets and make that competitive balance worse. But when this stuff happens in the NBA, it actually means something. The NFL is so unpredictable that it's actually become boring. Every single year, a bad team grossly overachieves, star players emerge out of nowhere (often to disappear as fast), there's a huge upset in the playoffs, and there's a bunch of "NFL experts" (in a league supposedly predicated on the idea that any team can win on any Sunday) wondering "WHO WOULDA THOT THIS CULD EVAR HAPPEN!?" And all the while, football fans complain about the design of the NBA, with its star players who get star treatment, and don't realize the NF ...


I'd rather have unpredictability than this

The two teams have won the two highest numbers of championships, the Celtics 17, the Lakers 16; together, the 33 championships account for more than half of the 65 championships in NBA history.
 
2012-02-17 01:23:57 PM  
A few facts lost in a rambling article.
 
2012-02-17 01:25:39 PM  

dletter: The guys point is that the whole Lin thing is basically because he is playing in NY, and that in the NFL, you can play on their teams like Green Bay and Jacksonville and still get star power. One, nobody on Jacksonville has every really been a top level "NFL Star"... two, the Green Bay Packers are an anomaly of the "small market" team stereotype in sports, because of their history, they have a national following despite playing in a city of 150,000. So, that is why Aaron Rodgers is a star there.


I would disagree that MJD is not a star for Jax as he is the only interesting thing about that team, but I kind of get where you are coming from. However, I really do not understand your assertion about Rodgers only being a star due to the history and culture of the Packers. If Rodgers put up the numbers that he currently does in Jax and got them deep in the playoffs/won a SB, he would be just as much a star as he is now.
If you disagree with that point, then here is my counterpoint - Indy attendance figures from this site:
Link (new window)

They have not had less than 450k in attendance since Peyton Manning's first year. Compare that to the previous instability, and even in a smallish market, people will watch a tremendous talent and he can be a national star. In the NFL, there are no "small market" teams. There are just mega-popular and slightly less popular. Which is why I find it odd how the Pirates in baseball are touted as a "small market" team, but that tag is never used on the Steelers.


Season  Total  Capacity Change
1993 407,928 84% 4%
1994 396,462 82% -2.80%
1995 440,613 91% 11.10%
1996 438,026 90% -0.60%
1997 451,455 93% 3.10%
1998 440,930 91% -2%
1999 453,270 94% 2.80%
2000 454,319 101.20% 0.20%
2001 450,746
2002 453,357
2003 451,531
2004 456,791
2005 457,373
2006 457,154
2007 458,437
2008 531,026
2009 532,398
2010 535,802
2011 518,627
 
2012-02-17 01:28:49 PM  
i2.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-02-17 01:30:22 PM  
They are both dumb.

The NBA just keeps buying into taller ballers, and stops the clock too much near the finish.
The NFL just keeps buying into wider ballers, and stops the clock too much near the finish.

The NBA player is always yelling OHHH! to get a call.
The NFL player is always grunting UNNHH! when he gets his double wide shiat rattled.
 
2012-02-17 01:31:45 PM  

hbk72777: I'd rather have unpredictability than this

The two teams have won the two highest numbers of championships, the Celtics 17, the Lakers 16; together, the 33 championships account for more than half of the 65 championships in NBA history.


I would rather have something closer to that than a league where I'm sold a new narrative every single year. Compared to the NFL potpourri, the Lakers and the Celtics are genuine.
 
2012-02-17 01:33:33 PM  

Automator: He does have a point. LeBron didn't get any publicity or attention at all in Cleveland. Only when he went to Miami did fans "find" him.


notsureifserious.jpg

LeBron didn't get publicity and attention in Cleveland?

I hope you're being sarcastic.
 
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