Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(KATU)   If you can think of something to do with 20,000 cubic yards of smashed bottles, the recycling capital of the US would like to talk to you   (katu.com) divider line 89
    More: Stupid, cubic yards, recycling  
•       •       •

7701 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Feb 2012 at 11:59 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



89 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-02-16 09:07:25 AM  
One of my favorite Fark headlines of years past: Glass. Parking. Lot.
 
2012-02-16 09:21:49 AM  
I bet it'd have a good R-value, build a house.
 
2012-02-16 09:59:46 AM  

nekom: I bet it'd have a good R-value, build a house.


I wouldn't call .14 a good R-value.
 
2012-02-16 10:05:24 AM  

Gecko Gingrich: nekom: I bet it'd have a good R-value, build a house.

I wouldn't call .14 a good R-value.


Hmm can they be unsmashed? I bet empty not smushed up plastic bottles with lids on would do a lot better.
 
2012-02-16 10:07:30 AM  
GLASS PARKING LOT
 
2012-02-16 10:34:22 AM  
Playground sand.

Shiny colorful playground sand.
 
2012-02-16 10:39:42 AM  
I'll just quietly leave this here: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)
 
2012-02-16 10:39:54 AM  

nekom: Hmm can they be unsmashed? I bet empty not smushed up plastic bottles with lids on would do a lot better.


Plastic (specifically HDPE), by itself has a higher R-value than glass, around 3.5. Couple that with the dead air space inside a sealed bottle, and you'll have a lot more insulation than crushed glass.
 
2012-02-16 11:25:33 AM  

Grables'Daughter: I'll just quietly leave this here: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)



It's the thought that counts.
 
2012-02-16 11:31:48 AM  

Amos Quito: Grables'Daughter: I'll just quietly leave this here: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)


It's the thought that counts.


LOL
 
2012-02-16 12:02:52 PM  
Grind them up and use them for blast media. Then send it down to the shipyards.
 
2012-02-16 12:08:40 PM  
FTA: glass people put out at their curbside for recycling may be dumped in a surprising place: a landfill.

/Oh you whacky environmentalists!
 
2012-02-16 12:12:00 PM  
Yippie ki yay, motherfarkers
 
2012-02-16 12:18:25 PM  

Amos Quito: Playground sand.
Shiny colorful playground sand.


Or a nice kids' toy.

lh5.googleusercontent.com
 
2012-02-16 12:18:37 PM  
i218.photobucket.com
 
2012-02-16 12:23:28 PM  

Procedural Texture: Amos Quito: Playground sand.
Shiny colorful playground sand.

Or a nice kids' toy.

[lh5.googleusercontent.com image 432x325]


I don't understand. I mean, children could seriously cut themselves on any one of these pieces!
 
2012-02-16 12:25:24 PM  
I started to say mix the shards in with concrete when pouring building foundations or whatever. But then I wondered if the cost of transportation would be more than the simple cost of concrete (which is probably pretty cheap, all things considered).
 
2012-02-16 12:26:41 PM  
Glass has actually been successfully used in asphalt and concrete pavements as a filler. Or, it could be used to fill in a large road or earthen embankment. Or, it could be melted and then recast into odd shapes for decorative purposes.

/one thing's for certain, that much of it isn't going anywhere
//glass decomposes verrrrrry slowly
 
2012-02-16 12:27:53 PM  
I have this large quantity of string, a hundred and twenty-two thousand miles of it to be exact.

/due to bad planning, the hundred and twenty-two thousand miles is in three inch lengths
 
2012-02-16 12:28:21 PM  

Grables'Daughter: I'll just quietly leave this here: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)


Interesting read, though I probably wouldn't have ended three consecutive paragraphs with "will always produce incorrect conclusions." (emphasis theirs) I know it's propaganda, but that doesn't mean you have to yell "we are right and you must listen to us" to work.
 
2012-02-16 12:28:49 PM  
Though the glass is being put to a good use at the landfill, people in the recycling industry argue it is not the best use of the glass.

Many experts say there is more bang for the environmental buck if glass can be turned back into glass.


What is the conversion rate of dollars to environmental bucks? Is the value of an environmental buck indexed against something tangible or just the associated feelgoodery?

I guess I just don't understand the point these "experts" are trying to make. It seems like a good thing to me that they are being put to a good use that is a lot cheaper than turning it into glass. It isn't like we are talking about unobtainium that can only be mined in poor regions of Africa by armless African slave babies here. It is melted sand ffs.
 
2012-02-16 12:28:57 PM  
Encapsulation of the thousands of tonnes of liquid radioactive waste that the country has built up. This makes the waste easy to store, non-corrosive to it's long-term storage container, and prevents it from seeping into the groundwater supply.

Win-win-win.
 
2012-02-16 12:30:10 PM  
It says right in the article a lot of it gets crushed and incorporated into pavement. That's.. recycling, right?
 
2012-02-16 12:30:17 PM  
I'd turn it into a football-field-sized lens or mirror and use it to collect solar heat.

And at night I'd use it for part of the world's biggest telescope.
 
2012-02-16 12:31:53 PM  

Wodan11: I started to say mix the shards in with concrete when pouring building foundations or whatever. But then I wondered if the cost of transportation would be more than the simple cost of concrete (which is probably pretty cheap, all things considered).


I thought of the same thing. However, concrete erodes over time, eventually exposing sharp glass edges. It's bad enough to skin your knee on regular concrete. Imagine doing it on the new, improved, "cheese shredder" kind.
 
2012-02-16 12:34:13 PM  

HAMMERTOE: Wodan11: I started to say mix the shards in with concrete when pouring building foundations or whatever. But then I wondered if the cost of transportation would be more than the simple cost of concrete (which is probably pretty cheap, all things considered).

I thought of the same thing. However, concrete erodes over time, eventually exposing sharp glass edges. It's bad enough to skin your knee on regular concrete. Imagine doing it on the new, improved, "cheese shredder" kind.


RTFA then. They tumble the shards so there are no sharp edges.
 
2012-02-16 12:34:59 PM  
Lawyer dragging
 
2012-02-16 12:35:54 PM  
Waste is a terrible thing to mind.
 
2012-02-16 12:39:05 PM  

umad: RTFA then. They tumble the shards so there are no sharp edges.


Effectively turning it back into sand then? Just dump it on a beach that's eroding.
 
2012-02-16 12:39:44 PM  

White Rose Duelist: Grables'Daughter: I'll just quietly leave this here: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)

Interesting read, though I probably wouldn't have ended three consecutive paragraphs with "will always produce incorrect conclusions." (emphasis theirs) I know it's propaganda, but that doesn't mean you have to yell "we are right and you must listen to us" to work.


And here is an interesting watch - Penn & Teller on why recycling is Bullshiat. (new window)
 
2012-02-16 12:44:09 PM  

Grables'Daughter: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)


Interesting read.

/btw, U've got male/
 
2012-02-16 12:44:49 PM  
I'm more interested in the Maria Menounos bikini article.


/I'll be in my bunk under my desk
 
2012-02-16 12:45:14 PM  
Yeah, Subby and a large percentage of the posters in thread miss a very fine distinction - the "complaint" of the article is that it would be ideally economically more sound to be able to reuse the glass as glass, in containers windows et.al. ....except it isn't. Having it for use as an alternative to other mined aggregate is valuable. Not having it strewn about the countryside or included in a septic mass with all manner of other human waste may be valuable. Sounds to me like the normal road to opportunity.
 
2012-02-16 12:53:04 PM  

HAMMERTOE: Effectively turning it back into sand then?


More like small beads would be my guess. In either case, dumping it on a beach would probably work just fine.
 
2012-02-16 12:54:55 PM  
Santa Rosa Sunshine glass recycling (new window)

This county sells it as landscape material, looks pretty nice you can get it in tumbled pebbles, sand, or a crushed mix that won't cut you, and is fairly cheap.

The Coke museum in Atlanta has something similar around its grounds.
 
2012-02-16 12:55:23 PM  

HAMMERTOE: Grables'Daughter: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)

Interesting read.

/btw, U've got male/


As do you.
 
2012-02-16 12:55:36 PM  
My city has a recycling program with curbside pickup and they don't collect glass at all. I guess with all the sand in the world you have an endless supply of cheap material to make new glass.
 
2012-02-16 12:56:10 PM  

umad: HAMMERTOE: Wodan11: I started to say mix the shards in with concrete when pouring building foundations or whatever. But then I wondered if the cost of transportation would be more than the simple cost of concrete (which is probably pretty cheap, all things considered).

I thought of the same thing. However, concrete erodes over time, eventually exposing sharp glass edges. It's bad enough to skin your knee on regular concrete. Imagine doing it on the new, improved, "cheese shredder" kind.

RTFA then. They tumble the shards so there are no sharp edges.


That doesn't make the glass any softer.
 
2012-02-16 12:57:59 PM  

pointlessdude: Santa Rosa Sunshine glass recycling (new window)

This county sells it as landscape material, looks pretty nice you can get it in tumbled pebbles, sand, or a crushed mix that won't cut you, and is fairly cheap.

The Coke museum in Atlanta has something similar around its grounds.


That looks pretty good.

I am curious of if they are paid to take the glass?
 
2012-02-16 01:01:32 PM  

Gecko Gingrich: nekom: I bet it'd have a good R-value, build a house.

I wouldn't call .14 a good R-value.


You would actually be completely wrong.

The recycled glass bottles in Kansas City are turned into fiberglass insulation at a special plant.

While crushed glass may not insulate as well, spun glass is the most commonly used insulation.
 
2012-02-16 01:04:13 PM  

HAMMERTOE: Grables'Daughter: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)

Interesting read.

/btw, U've got male/


I don't have male, that's my problem.
 
2012-02-16 01:05:59 PM  

Grables'Daughter: pointlessdude: Santa Rosa Sunshine glass recycling (new window)

This county sells it as landscape material, looks pretty nice you can get it in tumbled pebbles, sand, or a crushed mix that won't cut you, and is fairly cheap.

The Coke museum in Atlanta has something similar around its grounds.

That looks pretty good.

I am curious of if they are paid to take the glass?


I am guessing that they are paid a lot of money to take the glass, and that's the only reason that they can do that economically.

See, that's my point on the economics of recycling: It doesn't make economic sense to recycle - EXCEPT for aluminum.
 
2012-02-16 01:06:44 PM  

Grables'Daughter: HAMMERTOE: Grables'Daughter: The Eight Great Myths of Recycling (new window)

Interesting read.

/btw, U've got male/

As do you.


Did I just witness a BIE go down?
 
2012-02-16 01:08:36 PM  
Grind up the bottles, mix them with cement and make roads out of them.

\\\ Works well elsewhere.
 
2012-02-16 01:08:51 PM  
Considering that glass is melted sand, I see no reason why recycled glass shouldn't be used as a sand substitute. Though with the glut they have, why not get some investment capital for a bottle factory.

/glassbeach.jpg
 
2012-02-16 01:11:06 PM  

algrant33: umad: HAMMERTOE: Wodan11: I started to say mix the shards in with concrete when pouring building foundations or whatever. But then I wondered if the cost of transportation would be more than the simple cost of concrete (which is probably pretty cheap, all things considered).

I thought of the same thing. However, concrete erodes over time, eventually exposing sharp glass edges. It's bad enough to skin your knee on regular concrete. Imagine doing it on the new, improved, "cheese shredder" kind.

RTFA then. They tumble the shards so there are no sharp edges.

That doesn't make the glass any softer.


Good point. We wouldn't want to be putting hard things like gravel or glass into concrete. Somebody could hurt themselves on it.
 
2012-02-16 01:11:54 PM  

olddinosaur: Grind up the bottles, mix them with cement and make roads out of them.

\\\ Works well elsewhere.


Sure, but what about the cost vs. new materials?
 
2012-02-16 01:14:00 PM  

Grables'Daughter: Grables'Daughter: pointlessdude: Santa Rosa Sunshine glass recycling (new window)

This county sells it as landscape material, looks pretty nice you can get it in tumbled pebbles, sand, or a crushed mix that won't cut you, and is fairly cheap.

The Coke museum in Atlanta has something similar around its grounds.

That looks pretty good.

I am curious of if they are paid to take the glass?

I am guessing that they are paid a lot of money to take the glass, and that's the only reason that they can do that economically.

See, that's my point on the economics of recycling: It doesn't make economic sense to recycle - EXCEPT for aluminum.


All glass comes from the normal county recycling and trash pickup. Site explains that it wasn't cost effective to send the sorted materials to a facilty for processing and they were getting about 200k lbs of glass each month that wound up in the landfill, so they bought on of these machines (new window) and sell the output for enough that it hopefully pays for the upkeep costs on it.
 
2012-02-16 01:18:44 PM  
My apartment doesn't take glass either so I just throw my empties on the pool deck.
 
2012-02-16 01:18:53 PM  
Grind it up and turn it into filler for bread. Serve it in the schools
 
Displayed 50 of 89 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report