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(USA Today)   The demographics of the home-schooled continue to evolve and grow, from religious nutballs and the big ol' teeth in the past to the modern-day secular helo-mommy who never wants her precious baby out of her sight   (usatoday.com) divider line 344
    More: Interesting, National Center for Education Statistics, school ages, Virginia Department of Education, basic skills, Asbury Park, demographics, Heather Kirchner, Christine Bodwitch  
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6955 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Feb 2012 at 12:14 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-15 12:24:02 PM  
"This is southwestern Ohio, home of (Republican House Speaker) John Boehner..."

Oh, THAT John Boehner!
 
2012-02-15 12:24:47 PM  

homeschooled: Home-schooled? Did I seriously spell my username wrong?

My education has failed me yet again.


It's a username, spelling doesn't apply. If spelling mattered with proper nouns, then insert psuedo-racist comment here.
 
2012-02-15 12:25:32 PM  
I teach essay-writing skills to middle and high school students. Roughly 1/4 my students are from an Islamic private school, about 1/2 from a public school, and 1/4 are home-schooled.

The home-schooled kids are by far the most competent, followed by the private school kids. The ones from the local public schools (2 different schools) are way behind. It's an issue - I can't really teach them all the same material for the same age/grade level. My 4th grade home-schoolers can write a 4-paragraph narrative essay and the 5th grade public-schoolers are still fuzzy on the concept of intro/conclusion paragraphs and thesis statements.

I'm not a parent, but if I were, I'd do my best to home school if I can, even if it means I have to dedicate part of my life to keeping my *own* skills sharp so I can teach them. There's more than one way to raise a child. The idea that all these kids are going to turn into social incompetents is a little silly. Social skills develop through interaction with other children, but not necessarily *only* from the classroom environment we're used to. Neighborhood sports teams, field trips, summer camp, boy/girl scouts... there are plenty of ways to get your kid out there spending time with other kids, and they don't all involve sitting her still for 9 hours a day bent over standardized tests and trying to coerce/drug her individuality away.
 
2012-02-15 12:26:17 PM  

gimmegimme: I would be fine with homeschooling if parents could demonstrate they can, for example, still do calculus. So many Americans are unable to figure out the change without looking at the register or to find Iraq on a world map...what percentage of parents know what they're talking about?

They need to be certified to make sure they're not ruining their child's life...right?


I doubt most elementary teachers could do calculus.
 
2012-02-15 12:26:44 PM  
I always associated homeschool with religious nutballs until a friend told me (about 10 years ago) that they were doing it, so now I associate it with religious nutballs and nuts-and-granola nutballs. Now, self-obsessed yuppie nutballs.
 
2012-02-15 12:28:07 PM  

gimmegimme: RexTalionis: shivashakti: abb3w: You say that like that's a perfectly acceptable state of affairs.

I've never taken calculus and I don't think my life has been adversely affected by it. Sure, if someone was becoming an engineer or something that requires calculus, that's one thing.

But I don't see the need for all high school students to take it..

Somewhat on a tangent, I don't see how integral calculus is with homeschooling, anyway. Does anyone even derive any usage out of calculus in their everyday life? Frankly, calculus is one of a number of a divergent series of topics taught in schools that have no use in modern life. The absolute maximum use calculus might be used for is if somebody wanted to find out what the area under the golden arches might be - but who the hell does that, anyway? No, better for homeschooled children to differentiate themselves through other ways. Just as long as they don't wind up lacking the skills to deal with our information economy, otherwise they'll wind up as only a dish washer and would only know how to do washer methods.

Good point. I've never used the Earth Science I learned in high school. Get rid of that and biology. I'm never going to perform an autopsy; why did they make me cut open a worm?


and none people never kneed to lernt any gramars; or spelen,"=+

people can do whatever they want, but I'd be surprised if a homeschooled kid receives the breadth of education. It may go real deep in the area of the parent's knowledge, but that's a bit determinative of the child's life, usually limiting them to a liberal arts education.

for some reason, i have a feeling that most homeschooled kids come from liberal arts type families, while technically minded families are more likely to sent their kids to school.

/ I am a liberal arts person myself, but my schooling in sciences and math were invaluable to me. I even like pure maths, calculus and physics
// I plan on sending the children, if any, to school. What if their passion is math, and I stunt that passion by failing to teach them sufficiently because it's not one of my areas of knowledge?
 
2012-02-15 12:28:33 PM  

RexTalionis: shivashakti: abb3w: You say that like that's a perfectly acceptable state of affairs.

I've never taken calculus and I don't think my life has been adversely affected by it. Sure, if someone was becoming an engineer or something that requires calculus, that's one thing.

But I don't see the need for all high school students to take it..

Somewhat on a tangent, I don't see how integral calculus is with homeschooling, anyway. Does anyone even derive any usage out of calculus in their everyday life? Frankly, calculus is one of a number of a divergent series of topics taught in schools that have no use in modern life. The absolute maximum use calculus might be used for is if somebody wanted to find out what the area under the golden arches might be - but who the hell does that, anyway? No, better for homeschooled children to differentiate themselves through other ways. Just as long as they don't wind up lacking the skills to deal with our information economy, otherwise they'll wind up as only a dish washer and would only know how to do washer methods.


What you did there. I see it and I approve.
 
2012-02-15 12:29:47 PM  

offmymeds: "This is southwestern Ohio, home of (Republican House Speaker) John Boehner..."

Oh, THAT John Boehner!


I have a LeBaron convertible that was once owned by Mr. Jon Boehner.
 
2012-02-15 12:30:08 PM  

RexTalionis: shivashakti: abb3w: You say that like that's a perfectly acceptable state of affairs.

I've never taken calculus and I don't think my life has been adversely affected by it. Sure, if someone was becoming an engineer or something that requires calculus, that's one thing.

But I don't see the need for all high school students to take it..

Somewhat on a tangent, I don't see how integral calculus is with homeschooling, anyway. Does anyone even derive any usage out of calculus in their everyday life? Frankly, calculus is one of a number of a divergent series of topics taught in schools that have no use in modern life. The absolute maximum use calculus might be used for is if somebody wanted to find out what the area under the golden arches might be - but who the hell does that, anyway? No, better for homeschooled children to differentiate themselves through other ways. Just as long as they don't wind up lacking the skills to deal with our information economy, otherwise they'll wind up as only a dish washer and would only know how to do washer methods.


Wasn't sure about "area under the golden arches" or "information economy"...but good job sir!
 
2012-02-15 12:30:11 PM  

UberDave: DamnYankees: Sleeping Monkey: [t0.gstatic.com image 200x252]

/oblig

Came looking for this, and kudos to Subby for sneaking it into the headline.

I was beginning to think teef girl was forgotten...


Not likely. From my profile...
Fark can be cruel, never post a personal picture: Poor bastard (new window)
 
2012-02-15 12:31:10 PM  

Fano: abb3w: shivashakti: Most high-schoolers don't even learn calculus.

You say that like that's a perfectly acceptable state of affairs.

If they learned probability and statistics as a matter of course, I would be much more pleased.


Fano: abb3w: shivashakti: Most high-schoolers don't even learn calculus.

You say that like that's a perfectly acceptable state of affairs.

If they learned probability and statistics as a matter of course, I would be much more pleased.


I took both in high school, but they were not taught by the high school teachers. We had to go across the street to a local state college branch and were in a class with college freshmen. We still had to take the AP exam for clalc to get the credits, but stats counted as credits. Not sure where I was going with this.
 
2012-02-15 12:31:21 PM  
One person of my acquaintance takes the resumes of people who put down 'homeschooled' under their education section and they throw them in the trash.

I can't say I blame them, although I don't really feel like it's right.
 
2012-02-15 12:31:50 PM  
Tim Tebows Fiiiyah!
 
2012-02-15 12:32:27 PM  
i219.photobucket.com
 
2012-02-15 12:34:01 PM  
One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."
 
2012-02-15 12:34:17 PM  
Flakeloaf RexTalionis: shivashakti: abb3w: You say that like that's a perfectly acceptable state of affairs.

I've never taken calculus and I don't think my life has been adversely affected by it. Sure, if someone was becoming an engineer or something that requires calculus, that's one thing.

But I don't see the need for all high school students to take it..

Somewhat on a tangent, I don't see how integral calculus is with homeschooling, anyway. Does anyone even derive any usage out of calculus in their everyday life? Frankly, calculus is one of a number of a divergent series of topics taught in schools that have no use in modern life. The absolute maximum use calculus might be used for is if somebody wanted to find out what the area under the golden arches might be - but who the hell does that, anyway? No, better for homeschooled children to differentiate themselves through other ways. Just as long as they don't wind up lacking the skills to deal with our information economy, otherwise they'll wind up as only a dish washer and would only know how to do washer methods.

What you did there. I see it and I approve.


Finally! I was surprised at how long it would take this forum full of nerds to "see what he did there."
 
2012-02-15 12:34:18 PM  

RexTalionis: shivashakti: abb3w: You say that like that's a perfectly acceptable state of affairs.

I've never taken calculus and I don't think my life has been adversely affected by it. Sure, if someone was becoming an engineer or something that requires calculus, that's one thing.

But I don't see the need for all high school students to take it..

Somewhat on a tangent, I don't see how integral calculus is with homeschooling, anyway. Does anyone even derive any usage out of calculus in their everyday life? Frankly, calculus is one of a number of a divergent series of topics taught in schools that have no use in modern life. The absolute maximum use calculus might be used for is if somebody wanted to find out what the area under the golden arches might be - but who the hell does that, anyway? No, better for homeschooled children to differentiate themselves through other ways. Just as long as they don't wind up lacking the skills to deal with our information economy, otherwise they'll wind up as only a dish washer and would only know how to do washer methods.


It does not surprise me that the public school advocate doesn't find any use in calculus.
 
2012-02-15 12:35:40 PM  

Bacontastesgood: One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."


"Oh, no no no, you can't eat here. I've seen the crap that goes on in the kitchen and there's no way and hell I'm letting you touch those utensils because dishwasher is hooked up to the grey-water."
 
2012-02-15 12:36:09 PM  

AbbeySomeone: SJKebab: AbbeySomeone: Parents that send their kids to public school now are negligent at best. The 'education' they offer is a joke and they will be placed in classrooms with 'special needs' kids that disrupt things.
This isn't as much a problem in the better neighborhoods.

So poor people are negligent parents at best. Good to know.

Parent involvement is the key and unfortunately poor neighborhoods have a higher incidence of people that shouldn't have kids to begin with counting on the schools to take care of them.
Truth.

/worked in many schools public and private


Your bolded statement implies that no parent who sends their kid to public school engages in parental involvement. I find that to be a very moronic assertion coming from someone who I generally don't find to be a moron.

Not enough coffee?
 
2012-02-15 12:37:30 PM  

Rapmaster2000: offmymeds: "This is southwestern Ohio, home of (Republican House Speaker) John Boehner..."

Oh, THAT John Boehner!

I have a LeBaron convertible that was once owned by Mr. Jon Boehner.


Did you find a pencil in the glove compartment?
 
2012-02-15 12:37:36 PM  
I'll never understand why you folks are so down on homeschooling. My kids are both homeschooled. The oldest entered college at fifteen.

You act as if they have no social life (they do), are religious fanatics (many are pagans and atheists) or are the result of over-protective parents. Schools don't teach very well...that is all there is to it. I gladly pay the taxes to keep these schools open, even though my kids don't go to them...

It is amazing that folks who wouldn't consider themselves bigots will go after home schooled children with such zeal...
 
2012-02-15 12:37:49 PM  

Bacontastesgood: One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."


Okay, WTF? If they're working, who's actually teaching the kid then? Jesus?
 
2012-02-15 12:38:47 PM  

RexTalionis: I see no point in subsidizing private business entities with public funds if the public has a competing service already available.


It's not really competing in any real sense of the word when public entities get a pass on nearly all taxes (property, business, sales, gasoline, etc.) and can have any shortfall in funding made up by simply levying more taxes. Competing businesses pay various manner of taxes and have to provide a service that is satisfactory to its customers in order to stay in business.

I see no point in paying public schools for children that aren't enrolled.
 
2012-02-15 12:39:56 PM  

Rapmaster2000: offmymeds: "This is southwestern Ohio, home of (Republican House Speaker) John Boehner..."

Oh, THAT John Boehner!

I have a LeBaron convertible that was once owned by Mr. Jon Boehner.


Don't you think Mr. Jon Boehner knows how to spell his own name?
 
2012-02-15 12:40:35 PM  

Bigger Leftist Intarweb Schlong: One person of my acquaintance takes the resumes of people who put down 'homeschooled' under their education section and they throw them in the trash.

I can't say I blame them, although I don't really feel like it's right.


Sounds like he's missing out on some good entertainment.
 
2012-02-15 12:41:07 PM  

homeschooled: Home-schooled? Did I seriously spell my username wrong?

My education has failed me yet again.


HA HA
 
2012-02-15 12:41:14 PM  

pedrop357: RexTalionis: I see no point in subsidizing private business entities with public funds if the public has a competing service already available.

It's not really competing in any real sense of the word when public entities get a pass on nearly all taxes (property, business, sales, gasoline, etc.) and can have any shortfall in funding made up by simply levying more taxes. Competing businesses pay various manner of taxes and have to provide a service that is satisfactory to its customers in order to stay in business.


So, you're saying that private businesses should get tax money?
 
2012-02-15 12:41:16 PM  
My wife and I are toying with homeschooling our daughter (she's two weeks old, so we've got a bit of time to discuss it).

On the one hand, our skills and knowledge bases complement one another's (she's artsy and creative, I can handle the gritty crap), we're both intelligent enough, and we're friends with enough teachers to know that the people going into public education have no business being in it (similar to how all the fat girls want to be nutritionists, I guess).

On the other hand, I don't want the kid labelled a religious weirdo, nor do I want her growing up sheltered. Plus, her mom and I are neither one outwardly social enough to insure she will be well socialized outside of school.

Can't we just make schools good?
 
2012-02-15 12:42:20 PM  

adamgreeney: Elvis_Bogart: gimmegimme: Damn The Government. Always getting in the way of people doing whatever the fark they want regardless of the societal consequences.

Yeah, you're right. It's a good thing to suspend a kid from school if he makes a gesture with his finger that looks sort of gun-like or dares to give another kid an aspirin.

When did you Lefty guys switch from "Fight The Power" to "Make Me Your biatch"?

You guys have an open invitation in the headline to post hot home school wife, and you're arguing with this jerk off? I am disappointed.


Good Lord, man. I'm with you.
 
2012-02-15 12:44:06 PM  

Lsherm: I went to engineering school with two kids who were home-schooled, and they were on the ball as far as academics were concerned. I'd venture a guess that most home-schooled kids get a pretty good education because the act itself is indicative of a very involved parent - usually one of the better barometers for predicting school success in the first place. One of them had a few social issues, but otherwise I'd say they came out ahead compared to other idiots I went to school with.


He wanted to be an engineer.....so it might not have been the home-schooling.
 
2012-02-15 12:44:30 PM  
It took me a moment to figure out that helo-mommy was an abbreviation of helicopter mommy, specifically the sub-type that waits for the bride or groom to cut the umbilical cord that binds them to baby.

My mother was more like the working class mommy who pushes the kids out of the house and tells them to go play in the traffic.

Some popular expressions useful in child-rearing:

* Why don't you go play in the traffic?
* Why don't you go home and see if I'm there yet.
* Why don't you STFU you nasty snot-oozing little weasel?1
* Let's play a game of hide and seek. I'll be it.
* Let's see who can be the quietest for the longest. I'll spot you a gag and handcuffs.
* Let's play cowboys and indians. I'll be the indians and tie you to the laundry pole.
* Well, you poison him right back. (This is a Charles Addams cartoon caption.)
* I hope you have children just like you when you grow up.2

1
This one was not actually used in my family or by the neighbors.
2This one is a very potent and dangerous curse. They will. Guess who will have to babysit for them?
 
2012-02-15 12:44:37 PM  
My wife is becoming a teacher (getting kick, etc.) and had to spend a couple of weeks student teaching a bunch of seniors in high school. The books they were reading, and many were having trouble with, were the same ones I remember reading in eighth grade in the late-70s -- and I was by no means a "brain."

My preschool daughter can read and knows how to count and rhyme. My 2-year-old son can spell his own name. It's all about parental involvement. (Scares the hell out me when I daughter enters kindergarten next year and has to sit next to Johnny who can't count or read because Mommy and Daddy were too busy watching Divorce Court to teach him anything.)
 
2012-02-15 12:44:58 PM  

Shazam999: Bacontastesgood: One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."

Okay, WTF? If they're working, who's actually teaching the kid then? Jesus?


If there are 40 kids in a classroom, do you really think having a "teacher" in the room would be much different?
 
2012-02-15 12:45:23 PM  

RexTalionis: I think of it more as a matter of whether the government should subsidize people to ship via, say, UPS or FedEx, so that the cost of shipping with those services is equal to the cost of the USPS.

If people want to pay to use a private service, make them pay for it. Don't rob public schools of funding just so you can distort demand on the marketplace.


Except that USPS is funded (or supposed to be at least) entirely by shipping fees. If you don't want to ship packages or other NON-1st class mail with USPS, you can ship with UPS, Fedex, etc.
(The USPS has a statutory monopoly on 1st class mail).

A more apt analogy would be taxing everyone to fund the USPS while giving the USPS numerous breaks on taxes, zoning, borrowing, etc. and then pretending that the USPS is an even/equal competitor with Fedex, UPS, etc.

It's further absurd to intimate that it 'robs' the USPS of money if we allow individuals who choose not to use the USPS to control where the money (effectively) earmarked for them is to go. The USPS should not be paid for things it doesn't deliver, and the public school system should not be paid for kids it doesn't teach.
 
2012-02-15 12:45:27 PM  
Let me start by saying I was homeschooled, my wife is hot and I have a large penis.

Homeschooling is great if there is a structured lesson plan and some form of socialization. Ideally, the public school day would be a lot shorter and focus on testing and gym class, leaving the kids longer learn and do their homework. Essentially what that does is relegates the schools to the role of testing centers and physical fitness centers.

The next thing that would happen, pretty much organically, is lots of smaller private schools / tutoring centers would pop up to take the burden of teaching off those parents who, to gimmiegimmie's pint might be under-qualified, or simply too busy. Money saved by reducing the role of public schools could be used via a voucher system to offset the cost of these tutoring centers.

It will never happen though, because the current system is too wasteful, and that waste is too lucrative for anyone employed in that system. I'm looking at you, Superintendent Chaumers.
 
2012-02-15 12:45:30 PM  

gimmegimme: I would be fine with homeschooling if parents could demonstrate they can, for example, still do calculus. So many Americans are unable to figure out the change without looking at the register or to find Iraq on a world map...what percentage of parents know what they're talking about?


What do you expect? They probably went to a public school.
 
2012-02-15 12:46:14 PM  

AbbeySomeone: SJKebab: AbbeySomeone: Parents that send their kids to public school now are negligent at best. The 'education' they offer is a joke and they will be placed in classrooms with 'special needs' kids that disrupt things.
This isn't as much a problem in the better neighborhoods.

So poor people are negligent parents at best. Good to know.

Parent involvement is the key and unfortunately poor neighborhoods have a higher incidence of people that shouldn't have kids to begin with counting on the schools to take care of them.
Truth.

/worked in many schools public and private


just ... wow
unless you are a magnificent troll, that is easily the most ignorant thing i've read or been exposed to lately.

if you are the benchmark for teachers, both public & private, you just made the strongest case ever for home schooling.
also, you made a pretty hearty case for why teacher contracts and levels of performance need a huge overhaul in this country.

& the guy from billy madison has something to add here:

www.seriousland.com
 
2012-02-15 12:46:20 PM  

netweavr: Shazam999: Bacontastesgood: One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."

Okay, WTF? If they're working, who's actually teaching the kid then? Jesus?

If there are 40 kids in a classroom, do you really think having a "teacher" in the room would be much different?


Oh good, glad to see your reading comprehension is so pitiful you completely misunderstood three lines of text.
 
2012-02-15 12:47:25 PM  
As long as our public schools are still using "The Prussian School System" I'm not sticking my kid in one. He'll go to Montessori school and then be taught at home. If he wants to go to a public high school, fine. He'll be past the age where they can break his spirit.

Public schools are pretty much designed to make little unquestioning automatons who love their country. They don't teach logic, rhetoric or much of anything, really. The schools are prison environments made to turn out good factory workers and soldiers. We don't have any factories.

Guess what Germany got after years of the Prussian School System?
/Godwinned
 
2012-02-15 12:47:45 PM  
As far as teaching goes we are still in the stone ages. The method of standing in front of a class and droning on about a subject is the-worst-possible way to teach someone something, Especially a kid.

Why do we do it that way? It's cheap. It's easy. The few freaks that can learn better than others that way want to maintain their superiority.

We have a whole spectrum of tools available to use to make learning fun, like it's supposed to be. Like it is for every other animal on the planet. Computer games, interactive stuff on the internet, television and many others.

Also, mostly due to the few freaks, we insist on wasting HUGE amounts of time teaching worthless skills. In English, spelling is a big culprit. Just own up to the fact that English has a problem and start spelling things the way they should be spelled. That would free up YEARS of education for things like math and science, the only two things that really matter to us as a species. Eliminate gym, most history, literature, art and we could make our kids amazingly functional and dynamic in a short time. Then they can pursue whatever interests them.
 
2012-02-15 12:48:06 PM  

luckybob343: My wife and I are toying with homeschooling our daughter (she's two weeks old, so we've got a bit of time to discuss it).

On the one hand, our skills and knowledge bases complement one another's (she's artsy and creative, I can handle the gritty crap), we're both intelligent enough, and we're friends with enough teachers to know that the people going into public education have no business being in it (similar to how all the fat girls want to be nutritionists, I guess).

On the other hand, I don't want the kid labelled a religious weirdo, nor do I want her growing up sheltered. Plus, her mom and I are neither one outwardly social enough to insure she will be well socialized outside of school.

Can't we just make schools good?


Sounds like the answer to your situation is "read to her constantly until she develops a love of reading on her own, let her go to normal school and learn how to relate with her peers, help her with her homework, do kid-mensa problems for fun, and limit her tv exposure to nature/discovery/etc. Also, take her to museums, etc.
 
2012-02-15 12:48:51 PM  
A hello-mommy must be the type of mommy that appears in a spread in Hello! magazine. It's a guess.
 
2012-02-15 12:49:37 PM  

Shazam999: netweavr: Shazam999: Bacontastesgood: One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."

Okay, WTF? If they're working, who's actually teaching the kid then? Jesus?

If there are 40 kids in a classroom, do you really think having a "teacher" in the room would be much different?

Oh good, glad to see your reading comprehension is so pitiful you completely misunderstood three lines of text.


I apologize if I came off as antagonistic, that was not the intent.
 
2012-02-15 12:50:29 PM  

GAT_00: Elvis_Bogart: Don't they have to pass state competency tests like every one else?

And here I thought the argument was state tests are a waste of time and don't actually teach anything. A tool used by the teachers unions so they can pretend they're teaching kids when they're just wasting money. I guess they're OK whenever you can use them to make a point.


facepalm.jpg

The point is that homeschooled children can/do/have/must pass these dumbed down tests and frequently surpass those standards. There are some parents who recognize the limitations of a school system geared toward the bottom of the learning curve and choose to homeschool purposely to keep thier kids stimulated.

My 17 year old surpassed all the HS math levels available and is now taking a college class so he can keep progressing. We're lucky his school has developed a program which has an outlet for accelerated kids. Many do not.
 
2012-02-15 12:50:46 PM  
I home schooled my kids. After Columbine (do you all even remember that?), the FBI came out with a list of 10 characteristics of children who "might pose a threat to society". Above average intelligence. Access to the Internet. Wears black. Plays violent video games. I don't remember them all. But my kids were spot on for all but black makeup and a history of violence.

So, when my daughter came home from school crying because the kids were harassing her for being different for the fourth time in one week . . at the high school closest to Fort Carson, so mouth breathing military spawn . . .I took both of them out of school. We unschooled. They studied what they wanted. Sometimes I'd give them assignments. But mostly we just did what we had always done, be intensely curious. And when it came time to take the GED test, guess what? They did awesome. The facilitator said they had the highest grades she'd ever seen. My daughter missed one question on science.

I know this MIGHT be a shock to you all, but education used to be parent run. Even after public education became something we did in this country, parents STILL hired the teacher in small towns. And she taught what the parents wanted. Calculus. Reality check, sillies. The vast majority of folks will NEVER use calculus after they leave high school. Hell, the "average" person reads ONE BOOK after they leave high school--which means there are thousands out there who never read anything again because I have read thousands of books in my life.

Why not let parents teach their kids whatever they want? Or educate kids to prepare them for the life they will face. A lot less drop outs if we weren't trying to force all children into a "this is how to get into college" education. A lot more vocational education at younger ages. If a child isn't all that smart, getting them ready to work by 16 would have advantages for society. EVEN if the only thing a child can do is flip burgers, having them do that instead of run around bored and getting into trouble seems like a good idea.
 
2012-02-15 12:51:02 PM  

netweavr: Shazam999: netweavr: Shazam999: Bacontastesgood: One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."

Okay, WTF? If they're working, who's actually teaching the kid then? Jesus?

If there are 40 kids in a classroom, do you really think having a "teacher" in the room would be much different?

Oh good, glad to see your reading comprehension is so pitiful you completely misunderstood three lines of text.

I apologize if I came off as antagonistic, that was not the intent.


No, you didn't come off antagonistic, you simply completely misunderstood the conversation.
 
2012-02-15 12:51:45 PM  

Shazam999: netweavr: Shazam999: netweavr: Shazam999: Bacontastesgood: One trend around here are teachers in top-rated, award-winning public schools who HOMESCHOOL THEIR KIDS. I don't get it. What the fark. It's like a chef at a 4 star restaurant whose family comes in and he's like "oh, no no no, you can't eat this food. Wait till I get home, I'll cook something good."

Okay, WTF? If they're working, who's actually teaching the kid then? Jesus?

If there are 40 kids in a classroom, do you really think having a "teacher" in the room would be much different?

Oh good, glad to see your reading comprehension is so pitiful you completely misunderstood three lines of text.

I apologize if I came off as antagonistic, that was not the intent.

No, you didn't come off antagonistic, you simply completely misunderstood the conversation.


Care to rephrase?
 
2012-02-15 12:52:06 PM  

masercot: The oldest entered college at fifteen.


Hahaha, that's hilarious. If you thought that was a good idea, you're a moron, and I feel sorry for your kid.
 
2012-02-15 12:52:47 PM  
The demographics of the home-schooled continue to evolve and grow, from religious nutballs and the big ol' teeth in the past to the modern-day secular helo-mommy who never wants her precious baby out of her sight

... or, say, maybe parents who Love Their Children Enough not to subject them to Propaganda, Myths, Lies, and Unionism which produces robotic muffin-heads who cannot think, are riddled with STDs and cannot find their own ass with both hands an a road map.
 
2012-02-15 12:54:55 PM  

gtpooh: at the high school closest to Fort Carson, so mouth breathing military spawn


Excuse me? I remember more than a handful of guys in basic training saying, "Wow, they issued us a black trench coat!?!?"
 
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