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(NBC Philadelphia)   Animal slavery trial of PETA against Sea World begins. Shamu reportedly hires a real shark for a lawyer   (nbcphiladelphia.com) divider line 132
    More: Followup, SeaWorld Orlando, Seaworld, SeaWorld San Diego, slavery, killer, service dog  
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4013 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Feb 2012 at 10:56 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-08 12:14:32 PM

Nemo's Brother: This is what liberals actually believe.


Right, apply the lunatic fringe to all "liberals". That's fair. Would you like a similar set of criteria applied to all conservatives? Didn't think so.
 
2012-02-08 12:16:15 PM

Mugato: Nemo's Brother: This is what liberals actually believe.

Right, apply the lunatic fringe to all "liberals". That's fair. Would you like a similar set of criteria applied to all conservatives? Didn't think so.


So, slavery has a liberal bias?
Or, Liberals have a slavery bias?
 
2012-02-08 12:20:44 PM

yves0010: PETA tried something like this at my local aquarium. They wanted them to release the Dolphins


After last season I say let them go. Sure Hene got hurt early, but he stinks on ice too.
 
2012-02-08 12:21:00 PM
"for the first time in our nation's history, a federal court heard arguments as to whether living, breathing, feeling beings have rights and can be enslaved simply because they happen to not have been born human."

I was worried for a minute.

www.eatmedaily.com
 
2012-02-08 12:36:33 PM

Mugato: Nemo's Brother: This is what liberals actually believe.

Right, apply the lunatic fringe to all "liberals". That's fair. Would you like a similar set of criteria applied to all conservatives? Didn't think so.


If you want to label extreme liberals and extreme conservatives as lunatics, I have no problem with it.
 
2012-02-08 12:37:59 PM
My $0.02: I'm not fond of zoos, particularly those that house the larger primates. I don't like aquariums that have cetaceans.

That being said, PETA's stance on the matter is far too extreme. Their past actions prove that they do far more harm than good.

The judge really has no option but to dismiss this case. "Slavery" is a legal term that applies only to humans. "Imprisonment" is a legal term that applies only to humans. The 13th Amendment applies only to humans. And since PETA can't claim any sort of ownership or control over the object of their suit (the orcas) they have no standing to file any sort of suit on their behalf.
 
2012-02-08 12:51:41 PM

Burke Turkey: For the record I believe only when education takes a top priority - IE sacrifice a few to save many. The wild whales are in trouble too. However, Seaworld only nominally educates people - they are a profit driven theme park that exploits the animals as rides and workers, not educational tools. I wish they would get shut down for all their dirty antics - they are as bad as Disney.


Could not agree more.
 
2012-02-08 12:55:12 PM
Cetaceans are People. Corporations are People. Fetuses are People. Are people still People? Even the poor brown ones? What if an unborn cetacean incorporated himself? That would be a personhood trifecta!
 
2012-02-08 12:55:19 PM

Rich Cream: Sharing living space with an animal doesn't make it a slave. Birds, fish etc are likely captives but not slaves. My cats can leave if they want, but they don't, dammit!


/"I love birds. Let me clip his wings so he can't fly and I'll keep him in a cage to boot!"

sigh


WTF is that last line about? FYI, a lot of birds aren't caged animals.

I LOVE my bird. His wings aren't clipped and he's very rarely in his cage unless he decides he wants to hang out there. He goes outside with me - and has flown off my shoulder only to head to another member of the flock.

If I'm not home, he's likely to be found in his special bird bed in his favorite room of the house (the bathroom) or on his perch at the front window.

When I'm at home, he's nearly always on my shoulder, or arm, or hand, or inside my shirt, or trying to drink out of my glass. He's a happy and well adjusted member of a family.

Oh, and he was a stray that I rescued almost five years ago.

So, what exactly was your point?
 
2012-02-08 01:01:18 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: I LOVE my bird. His wings aren't clipped and he's very rarely in his cage unless he decides he wants to hang out there. He goes outside with me - and has flown off my shoulder only to head to another member of the flock.

If I'm not home, he's likely to be found in his special bird bed in his favorite room of the house (the bathroom) or on his perch at the front window.

When I'm at home, he's nearly always on my shoulder, or arm, or hand, or inside my shirt, or trying to drink out of my glass. He's a happy and well adjusted member of a family.

Oh, and he was a stray that I rescued almost five years ago.


Terribly cool. What kind of bird? Pictures? Do you have any legal problems owning a 'wild' bird (for instance, in Kansas you can't own anything without a special license proving you know what you're doing - other than chickens and ducks, etc.)?

But I'm sure the bird-slavery folks will claim your bird is an Uncle Tom House bird who sold out his avian brothers. I think he's probably just a bird that likes your family and knows a good low-effort lifestyle when he sees it.
 
2012-02-08 01:04:16 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: Rich Cream: Sharing living space with an animal doesn't make it a slave. Birds, fish etc are likely captives but not slaves. My cats can leave if they want, but they don't, dammit!


/"I love birds. Let me clip his wings so he can't fly and I'll keep him in a cage to boot!"

sigh

WTF is that last line about? FYI, a lot of birds aren't caged animals.

I LOVE my bird. His wings aren't clipped and he's very rarely in his cage unless he decides he wants to hang out there. He goes outside with me - and has flown off my shoulder only to head to another member of the flock.

If I'm not home, he's likely to be found in his special bird bed in his favorite room of the house (the bathroom) or on his perch at the front window.

When I'm at home, he's nearly always on my shoulder, or arm, or hand, or inside my shirt, or trying to drink out of my glass. He's a happy and well adjusted member of a family.

Oh, and he was a stray that I rescued almost five years ago.

So, what exactly was your point?


you might want to cut back on the caffeine.
 
2012-02-08 01:16:38 PM

Aquapope: Terribly cool. What kind of bird? Pictures? Do you have any legal problems owning a 'wild' bird (for instance, in Kansas you can't own anything without a special license proving you know what you're doing - other than chickens and ducks, etc.)?

But I'm sure the bird-slavery folks will claim your bird is an Uncle Tom House bird who sold out his avian brothers. I think he's probably just a bird that likes your family and knows a good low-effort lifestyle when he sees it.


I named my buddy Alexander the Great. We call him Al, Alvin, Alphonse, Alejandro, or just about anything that starts with "Al." He's a Hahn's macaw - the smallest species of macaws. He's about 12 inchest from beak to tail.

I don't think that wild birds should be caught and "domesticated." It's a horrible experience for the bird. Getting a hand-raised bird from a breeder is different. They see humans as their flock, and can be great companions - if you know what you're doing. (Yes, I know that every exotic bird in a home in America has captured wild birds in their ancestry. Can't do anything about those now, though.)

Raptors in particular should definintely not be handled by anyone who doesn't know what they're doing. I'm sure there are raptor breeders, but I'm pretty sure that it's illegal to capture any bird of prey (short of rescuing a wounded animal.) Without a very knowledgeable and dedicated handler, any raptor kept by humans can be very unhappy and dangerous.

Anyway, here's Al - as captioned by a fellow farker.

images.icanhascheezburger.com
 
2012-02-08 01:28:29 PM

antidisestablishmentarianism: So PETA's argument is that all mammals are people?


And by logical extension, corporations.
 
2012-02-08 01:33:08 PM
chuckufarlie:
you might want to cut back on the caffeine.

But. . . but. . but. . . I LOVE caffeine!

Almost as much as I love beer and birdies.

In fact, here's a picture of Al giving me kisses.
img401.imageshack.us
 
2012-02-08 01:35:46 PM
If PETA tried this trick at the monkey house in the zoo, would they expect their lawyers to take their case on a pro bonobo basis?
 
2012-02-08 01:44:42 PM

mysticcat: I'm certainly no PETA supporter, but I have to side with them on this one. Orcas should not be kept in captivity.

I came to this conclusion in a roundabout way. A guy I hunt with regularly sent me a link profiling Dr. Jeffrey Ventre, a former SeaWorld trainer and classmate of his at Florida State. In a nut shell, Orcas' natural behaviors such as "jaw popping" lead to injury in captivity. They also have to have all their teeth drilled out and filed to keep from developing infections. It's nasty.

For more info, check it out (new window)


Because they get so much better dental care in the wild???
 
2012-02-08 01:47:39 PM
Came for the Star Trek leaving dissapoint.

Gracie is pregnant

Double dumb ass on you!
 
2012-02-08 01:48:38 PM

Slaxl: If I wasn't so lazy I'd research it all and draw my own conclusions, but since this is fark... you tell me what to believe, provided you're neither a PETA member, nor a seaworld type park owner.


What about all the plant life people enslave in their gardens in the summer -- especially those tomato families. The humans eat their young. Slave owners and cannibals -- all of them.
 
2012-02-08 01:56:31 PM
Don't animals at Sea World actually have shorter life spans than the same animals in the wild? Sources on this? Isn't that generally a bad sign? I don't have time to look for a reputable source- can someone confirm/disprove this???
 
2012-02-08 01:59:49 PM

ExperianScaresCthulhu: yves0010: PETA tried something like this at my local aquarium. They wanted them to release the Dolphins and Matinees into the wild. But the aquarium brought up the best argument, The dolphins in the shows were born in captivity and would die in the wild. The matinees were all severely injured and couldn't survive in the wild. So releasing them into the wild would actually kill them.

I hope the judge is teasing PETA and making them think hes being serious about letting this go to trail.

PETA doesn't care. :( PETA takes the ultra hard line that it's better to die in the wild than live in captivity. I'm like, sure, if you're an elephant chained up in a sick, frakked up backwoods circus with no companionship or stimulation. But PETA is anti-pet ownership and anti-any captivity, even if it's in the best interests of the individual animal who would die or be extinct otherwise. Fk 'em.


They're definitely not against animal-based insulin for their own consumption. Link (new window)
 
2012-02-08 02:00:39 PM
I'm all for treating animals kindly, and with great care. BUT. If you're going to say they are being "exploited" or used as "slaves" then you are going to have to show that they have enough cognitive reasoning abilities to be upset, or embarrassed by where they are, or have the understanding that they are "captive" and long for a life out in the free world. Until then - just make sure they are treated well, and shut the fark up.
 
2012-02-08 02:05:34 PM
I think PETA should concentrate on the slaughterhouse and puppy mill side of things. It is good to keep the zoos honest too, but frankly it is the least of the animal cruelty going on, and there is some benefit for the larger population of animals for humans to get the aquarium and zoo experience.
 
2012-02-08 02:16:45 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: chuckufarlie:
you might want to cut back on the caffeine.

But. . . but. . but. . . I LOVE caffeine!

Almost as much as I love beer and birdies.

In fact, here's a picture of Al giving me kisses.
[img401.imageshack.us image 320x240]


and what is the list of possible diseases that you might inflict on the bird??

You though I was going to ask about diseases you might get, huh???
 
2012-02-08 02:27:26 PM
That this case was not dismissed out of hand is absurd. Was the judge drunk? Was the judge good at holding three billiard balls in his mouth?
 
2012-02-08 02:34:10 PM
PETA are idiots for trying to confer human rights on non-human animals, but that doesn't necessarily mean Sea World's treatment of their killer whales aren't violations of animal cruelty laws. Hell, even if they could lawyer around those extant animal cruelty laws, I'd argue that history demonstrates that orcas are too large (and thus, dangerous even under optimal conditions) to be safely used as performance animals, plus they don't seem behaviorally suited to it at all.

Don't forget, performing is basically playing for a lot of animal performers. Not all but many. Check your ideas about "human dignity" at the door, the animals themselves don't care about that one lick.
 
2012-02-08 02:34:34 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: Rich Cream: Sharing living space with an animal doesn't make it a slave. Birds, fish etc are likely captives but not slaves. My cats can leave if they want, but they don't, dammit!


/"I love birds. Let me clip his wings so he can't fly and I'll keep him in a cage to boot!"

sigh

WTF is that last line about? FYI, a lot of birds aren't caged animals.

I LOVE my bird. His wings aren't clipped and he's very rarely in his cage unless he decides he wants to hang out there. He goes outside with me - and has flown off my shoulder only to head to another member of the flock.

If I'm not home, he's likely to be found in his special bird bed in his favorite room of the house (the bathroom) or on his perch at the front window.

When I'm at home, he's nearly always on my shoulder, or arm, or hand, or inside my shirt, or trying to drink out of my glass. He's a happy and well adjusted member of a family.

Oh, and he was a stray that I rescued almost five years ago.

So, what exactly was your point?


I think Rich's point is that bird's are not intended to be caged, and many do have their wings clipped who are part of human families. If you get a bird from a petstore instead of a breeder, they are more likely to be clipped. I've seen how flame-y the online wars get between 'clipped' and 'unclipped' between owners, with one argument for clipping being that a) it keeps them safe and b) it makes them easier to train. Everyone's mileage varies.

Many birds are caged, and are caged in environments which are way too small for them; some aren't even allowed 'out of cage' time. But you're right, that's not all owners. Still, it's a damned good number, and the popular image of birds is that they are caged, tweety bird style, not that they are free.

I also head out places with mine, though they haven't flown off yet. I'd have a heart attack. Too many hawks and owls out here in the desert, who pick up pet birds (and pet cats, and pet dogs) for dinner.

I'm glad you rescued your fid. Too many are neglected when they're no longer 'cute' and young and impressionable.

/i don't clip
//because I don't trust myself with sharp objects around their important parts
 
2012-02-08 02:35:49 PM
Your Honor, permission to treat the DEA's drug-dog as a hostile witness?
 
2012-02-08 02:38:43 PM

chuckufarlie: and what is the list of possible diseases that you might inflict on the bird??

You though I was going to ask about diseases you might get, huh???


Hehe. Nah, I wasn't anticipating either question.

Guess I need MORE CAFFEINE!!

Here's a video of when he tried to give me the bird flu. (new window)

/such a pretty boy
 
2012-02-08 02:39:41 PM
resource.mmgn.com

I'LL TAKE THE CASE!
 
2012-02-08 02:51:12 PM

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: If you're going to say they are being "exploited" or used as "slaves" then you are going to have to show that they have enough cognitive reasoning abilities to be upset, or embarrassed by where they are, or have the understanding that they are "captive" and long for a life out in the free world.


I have a great test for showing their cognitive reasoning ability and whether or not they are upset about being in captivity. Take them to their natural habitat and open the door for an hour and see what happens. All the ones that run, walk, swim, or fly back into the cage after that time is up may be transported back to seaworld without me biatching about it. The rest have expressed their preference. Yeah, many will die in the wild. Small price to pay if there is no next generation in their place. Animals shouldn't have to learn freakin' sign language for us to know being caged sucks. Just look at life spans and ability to reproduce in captivity.
 
2012-02-08 02:58:51 PM

ExperianScaresCthulhu: I think Rich's point is that bird's are not intended to be caged, and many do have their wings clipped who are part of human families. If you get a bird from a petstore instead of a breeder, they are more likely to be clipped. I've seen how flame-y the online wars get between 'clipped' and 'unclipped' between owners, with one argument for clipping being that a) it keeps them safe and b) it makes them easier to train. Everyone's mileage varies.

Many birds are caged, and are caged in environments which are way too small for them; some aren't even allowed 'out of cage' time. But you're right, that's not all owners. Still, it's a damned good number, and the popular image of birds is that they are caged, tweety bird style, not that they are free.

I also head out places with mine, though they haven't flown off yet. I'd have a heart attack. Too many hawks and owls out here in the desert, who pick up pet birds (and pet cats, and pet dogs) for dinner.

I'm glad you rescued your fid. Too many are neglected when they're no longer 'cute' and young and impressionable.

/i don't clip
//because I don't trust myself with sharp objects around their important parts.


There are many people who don't understand birds and should not have them - just as there are many people who have no business caring for a horse, dog, etc.

The situation with a bird - exotic birds in particular - is horrible if the people don't understand the flock mentality of the feathery ones. They aren't fish - to be fed and admired from a distance. They need to be close to a loved one. They are intelligent and curious - and they have sharp parts and are aware that they are somewhat fragile. Mutual respect and TONS of interaction are required for them to be happy.

I agree. A horrifying number of them end up caged and ignored - because they're loud, messy, bite, etc. All a product of being with people who have no business caring for a bird.

I've heard the pro/anti-clipping arguments too. I'm solidly on the anti-clipping side for my situation. Al likes to fly around the house, and I like a happy Al. No more to it than that. Yeah, it means I have to clean up bird shiat in the bathroom and by the front door. No biggie.

Yeah, I'd have a heart attack if Al flew off into the blue yonder. I just take him outside at home. He loves it, but sticks close to a family member. He's been lost before (that's how I ended up with him) and I think he's terrified of it happening again. He knows his way to the door from outside and has flown to it and waited for one of us to come and open it for him.

Hawks are my big fear for him outside. There would be nothing but a loud squawk and a puff of green feathers.
 
2012-02-08 02:58:54 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: I don't think that wild birds should be caught and "domesticated." It's a horrible experience for the bird. Getting a hand-raised bird from a breeder is different. They see humans as their flock, and can be great companions - if you know what you're doing. (Yes, I know that every exotic bird in a home in America has captured wild birds in their ancestry. Can't do anything about those now, though.)

Raptors in particular should definintely not be handled by anyone who doesn't know what they're doing.


I worked a little bit with 2 wild animal rehab places, and sometimes they can't be reintroduced to their former wild environment. When possible, these guys become teaching aids for K-12 wildlife speakers or zoo critters. When I worked with them we dealt with a blue heron, a great horned owl, a turkey vulture, all sorts of raccoons, opossums, squirrels with regular-sized nuts, and I got to help raise a litter of small hoary bats! You don't know freaky until you have a juvenile bat who's learning to fly try to crawl up your shorts! If he bites you, it's an instant death sentence for him because you have to necropsy his brain to prove he doesn't have rabies. Still, you teach a bat to fly by throwing him into the air and hoping he figures it out, which is kind of funny when they bounce.

Raptors are tough, because during the recuperation they will usually imprint on the rehabber, which makes them unreleasable. But sometimes you can go through the process of rehabbing without them seeing a human, and release them (the first time they actually see the people) and watch them scarper off like Mormons at St. Patrick's Parade. Then they sit on a limb and look around for a while to get their bearings and calm down, and all manner of things are well.

But you have proved that Al has chosen your family for his flock. He fits, he's happy, and the rest of the flock loves and cares for him. That's not anthropomorphizing, that's just behavior you expect in intelligent social critters. And he makes for an unbeatable pirate costume. I'm betting the Orcas have similar 'pod-mate' feelings for their humans, but PETA ironically can't conceive of that level of socialization.

Does he talk?
 
2012-02-08 03:11:03 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: Aquapope: Terribly cool. What kind of bird? Pictures? Do you have any legal problems owning a 'wild' bird (for instance, in Kansas you can't own anything without a special license proving you know what you're doing - other than chickens and ducks, etc.)?

But I'm sure the bird-slavery folks will claim your bird is an Uncle Tom House bird who sold out his avian brothers. I think he's probably just a bird that likes your family and knows a good low-effort lifestyle when he sees it.

I named my buddy Alexander the Great. We call him Al, Alvin, Alphonse, Alejandro, or just about anything that starts with "Al." He's a Hahn's macaw - the smallest species of macaws. He's about 12 inchest from beak to tail.

I don't think that wild birds should be caught and "domesticated." It's a horrible experience for the bird. Getting a hand-raised bird from a breeder is different. They see humans as their flock, and can be great companions - if you know what you're doing. (Yes, I know that every exotic bird in a home in America has captured wild birds in their ancestry. Can't do anything about those now, though.)

Raptors in particular should definintely not be handled by anyone who doesn't know what they're doing. I'm sure there are raptor breeders, but I'm pretty sure that it's illegal to capture any bird of prey (short of rescuing a wounded animal.) Without a very knowledgeable and dedicated handler, any raptor kept by humans can be very unhappy and dangerous.

Anyway, here's Al - as captioned by a fellow farker.

[images.icanhascheezburger.com image 500x375]


sunsetintherearview.com

But they can deliver messages for you... it helps prevent email clutter.

/any reason they don't just use a PHONE??
 
2012-02-08 03:11:50 PM

Aquapope: But you have proved that Al has chosen your family for his flock. He fits, he's happy, and the rest of the flock loves and cares for him. That's not anthropomorphizing, that's just behavior you expect in intelligent social critters. And he makes for an unbeatable pirate costume. I'm betting the Orcas have similar 'pod-mate' feelings for their humans, but PETA ironically can't conceive of that level of socialization.

Does he talk?


Amusingly enough, I'm an ordained minister of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Pirate costumes indeed!! (yar)

It sounds like you've had some amazing experiences with wild animals. I'd love to spend a good portion of my retirement years doing just the type of work you described.

Al's situation is exactly what you said, and no - it's not anthropomorphization. It's simply understanding the mindset of the species and learning what it takes for them to feel like part of their natural group. He definitely knows that we're his flock, and that's what he needs. So, we preen each other and snuggle up all the time - because that's what he'd do with his flock in the wild.

Yes, he's very vocal. He talks quite a bit - the typical phrases. He has four different "hellos" for different occasions, cheerfully yells "Buh-bye!!" when you leave, and has an uncanny knack of waiting until you're concentrating on something other than him and asking "What are you doing?" He loves to ask if he's a pretty boy, if he's a good boy, etc.

What's really fun are his sound effects. He makes sounds like flowing water, wolf whistles, the coffee grinder, sneezes, coughs, meows, barks, and on and on. He's pretty musical too, and does what I generally call "trumpeting." He makes up his own little toons and we play a verbal Simon Says.
 
2012-02-08 03:21:10 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: Here's a video of when he tried to give me the bird flu. (new window)


Bwahahaha, that is the most adorable thing ever. I would love to have a macaw or a conure someday, but I won't because I known darn well I wouldn't be able to provide for them as they require, unless I become a full-time writer. I admire you for taking the time to care for such a beautiful critter.

/thinks PETA is a few hairs short of a winter coat, as it were.
 
2012-02-08 03:21:47 PM
See it all begins.
Prop 8 overturned.
Peta sues for Whales to be protected under constituion... and win.
Whales now have rights and thus can be sexual partners.
Now we have people with the right to marry and fark animals.


THINK ABOUT IT.


/snicker
 
2012-02-08 03:32:42 PM

BrynnMacFlynn: I admire you for taking the time to care for such a beautiful critter.


I appreciate that, but I assure you - the evenings are the highlight of my day just because I get to be with the little bugger. He's my best buddy ever, so it's not exactly a chore.

/My oldest daughter is away in college and misses him so much, she got a tattoo of one of his feathers.
 
2012-02-08 03:35:22 PM

Ennuipoet: Slaxl: If I wasn't so lazy I'd research it all and draw my own conclusions, but since this is fark... you tell me what to believe, provided you're neither a PETA member, nor a seaworld type park owner.

Being neither, but rather a rational human being I will be happy to assist you. PETA is a group of attention whoring, money grubbing asshats who do more to harm animals in one hour than most people do in a year. The Constitution is written by and for human beings, unless whales have suddenly developed the ability to vote and pay taxes, they do not fall in that category. Whatever judge did not immediately toss this case out and did not order the lawyers and PETA members who brought it forward beaten severely should be beaten severely.


That was f-ing brilliant.
 
2012-02-08 03:36:43 PM
Animal slavery trial of PETA against Sea World begins. Shamu reportedly hires a real shark for a lawyer

I bet they get chummy going through this together.
/was hoping for more puns
 
2012-02-08 03:38:26 PM
Shamu destroyed my camera when I went there when I was young, so as far as I'm concerned, that splashy motherfarker deserves to be locked up in captivity!

/Who knew they were so damn serious about the "splash zone"??
//I expected maybe a few stray drops, and instead got drenched by a tsunami!
 
2012-02-08 03:41:36 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: So, what exactly was your point?



Rich Cream: Some people take better care of their responsibilities than other people?

 
2012-02-08 03:43:11 PM

Rich Cream: antidisestablishmentarianism: So PETA's argument is that all mammals are people?


No, just alive and therefore cognizant of any suffering.


/except fish, they have no nerve endings so they don't feel the mutilation that occurs when their lip is ripped off.
//yeah, right.


Alive does not mean "cognizant of any suffering".
 
2012-02-08 03:44:30 PM

Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: I appreciate that, but I assure you - the evenings are the highlight of my day just because I get to be with the little bugger. He's my best buddy ever


Your bird?

That's kinda sad.
 
2012-02-08 03:45:01 PM

Carousel Beast: They're definitely not against animal-based insulin for their own consumption. Link (new window)


WOW! If you read that whole thing, you come away thinking this is the liberal version of the poster-child for cognitive dissonance. My canine teeth, digestive tract, and millions of years of evolution tell me I should love ripping Jeffery Kerr's calf muscle off of his tibia. But only a couple thousand years of socialization says I should hate myself for it. fark society, I say. Eat the stupid!
 
2012-02-08 03:45:21 PM

Rich Cream: Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: So, what exactly was your point?


Rich Cream: Some people take better care of their responsibilities than other people?


Fair enough.

Loving the excuse to talk about my little buddy.
 
2012-02-08 03:45:39 PM

jackobeast: Animal slavery trial of PETA against Sea World begins. Shamu reportedly hires a real shark for a lawyer

I bet they get chummy going through this together.
/was hoping for more puns


For that, we're gonna need a bigger boat.
 
2012-02-08 03:48:38 PM

Rich Cream: antidisestablishmentarianism: Rich Cream: /except fish, they have no nerve endings so they don't feel the mutilation that occurs when their lip is ripped off.
//yeah, right.

I hear clams have feelings too.

/no chowder for you..


All living things know when they are being harmed. To think otherwise is ignorant.

/hates seafood anyway


Well, you've proven that you don't understand what the word "suffering" means and how it's different from "being harmed."

Do you really think, though, that a virus "knows" it is being harmed? What about a fungus? A tree? Obviously, you've decided that a clam, lacking a brain, "knows" it is being harmed. What else falls into that category? I'm assuming you think that an ant "knows" it's being harmed, comprehends the concept of pain and suffering.
 
2012-02-08 03:52:56 PM
Shut down all the major zoos and places like seaworld, and see how much money goes to helping animals or the environment. People contribute more money to conservation efforts through admission to those places, and buying items, and donations when there's a major attraction like Shamu, Dolphins, Pandas, Manatees, etc. etc.

More money is contributed when people can go somewhere and see animals up close, identify with them, and enjoy themselves. In other words, people don't give a shiat about conservation when they can't make an immediate connection to some of the animals in some way. It's the same reason why sport fishermen and hunters often contribute the most money to conservation efforts. People contribute money through hunting/fishing permits to do outdoor activities they enjoy and the DNR has the ability to use it for conservation. The situation works a lot better than just demanding taxes or money for conservation, where people can't see an immediate return for their contribution. It would be great if people were simply willing to give money for conservation efforts out of the goodness of their heart, and because it's the right thing to do, but that is not at all realistic. That's where people like PETA fail. You cannot make people believe in your cause by being obnoxious and yelling like a crazy person, or making demands that are completely outside of societal norms or beliefs.
 
2012-02-08 03:59:26 PM

jst3p: jackobeast: Animal slavery trial of PETA against Sea World begins. Shamu reportedly hires a real shark for a lawyer

I bet they get chummy going through this together.
/was hoping for more puns

For that, we're gonna need a bigger boat.


well played, sir.
/tips hat
 
2012-02-08 04:00:15 PM

jst3p: Committee_For_Aesthetic_Deletions: I appreciate that, but I assure you - the evenings are the highlight of my day just because I get to be with the little bugger. He's my best buddy ever

Your bird?

That's kinda sad.


No way. I have plenty of friends and family. And, I'm obviously leaving out the human race here. You've never heard someone say that their dog is their best friend? Really?

But I digress. He's the one that comes flying to the front door shouting "hello" when he hears my car in the driveway. He's the one that hops onto my shoulder and runs happy laps around my head. He's the one that wants to snuggle up to my neck and snooze or preen my eyebrows. He does a hundred hilarious things a day, and is just pure joy for me.

On the other hand, every single human that I know - including the ones I love the most - cause some degree of stress at some time or another. If you think your loved ones are different, then you're not one of the thousands of Farkers who were biatching about their families last Thanksgiving.

I think that's why people love their pets so much, anyhow. It's a relationship that (if it's good) has no ulterior motives, no true stress, only basic expectations to fullfill - and is only based on a desire to be together.

As best buddies go, one could do much worse.
 
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