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(Boulder Daily Camera)   The mountain hippie's conundrum: Why is it okay to scream bloody murder whenever Walmart tries to build a store in your town, but you can't wait for the day Trader Joe's opens shop?   (dailycamera.com) divider line 139
    More: Interesting, Sean Maher, Wal-Mart, Broomfield, town, mountains, murders  
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7489 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Feb 2012 at 4:21 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-02-07 06:39:38 AM

untaken_name: Ed Finnerty: untaken_name: TheJoe03: Do you have evidence that the "liberal" places like Trader Joe's or Ben and Jerry's partake in shady business practices?

I do. They're corporations. If nothing else, pretending that a company is a person and has the rights of a person while shielding the actual decision-makers from the consequences of their decisions is a pretty shady business practice.

I think you were asked for some type of citation, or evidence. Not just your own opinion on how words are defined.

That was sweet, though.

I provided evidence. Perhaps you're thinking of "proof". Those are different things. My evidence may or may not be persuasive, but it's certainly evidence....and thank you.


So you have neither. Got it.
 
2012-02-07 06:44:58 AM

TheXerox: violentsalvation: Why even make this argument about walmart? Anyone who doesn't at least somewhat dislike walmart is an idiot. They have murdered small merchants everywhere in America and filled our lives with cheap plastic crap.

RTFA, the article states that REI did the same thing with several local outdoor apparel businesses in the Boulder area. Same applies to Trader Joe's, sure they have some neat stuff, but if you're in a town with a TJ's then you likely already have one or two local stores which already have an ample supply of weird stuff and aren't likely owned by a corporation.


REI represents a conundrum for me.

1 - I love the outdoors and have backpacked through the Grand Canyon, up portions of the AT, etc. I've purchased a very large amount of stuff from them and continue to do so (my wife, dog and I don't do much hiking-style camping, but we do go hiking all the time). Never buy stuff at full price from them, but their sales are generally very good and they seem to be a great place to get the lightweight and quality gear one needs for these activities.
2 - They tend to give money to charities that want to ban off-roading, something I also enjoy. I drove to Moab for a week of off-roading last year and am doing so again this year.

So the problem is that they support some of the activities I enjoy and want to help ban others I enjoy, all while having the gear I need.

As for Trader Joe's or any other retailer like that, you're correct - they all come in and put the squeeze on the local independents. In some instances we get better pricing, service, quality, and selection. In some we get better pricing and selection. In some, all suffer (WalMart).
 
2012-02-07 06:50:14 AM

Ed Finnerty: So you have neither. Got it.


What are you talking about? I provided my evidence earlier. You even quoted it. To which part of my statement do you object? The statement I made tends to prove that the companies named engage in shady business practice. In order for you to disprove my statement, you either need to show that the named companies are NOT corporations, or that corporate personhood is not a shady business practice. I highly doubt you can do either. Evidence is something which tends to prove something. Proof is a subset of evidence which is incontrovertible. Thus, they are not interchangeable terms. Though it is true that all proof is evidence, it is NOT true that all evidence is proof. Proof is not what was asked for. Evidence was what was asked for. Evidence was what I provided. The fact that you don't understand the distinction is in no way my fault.
 
2012-02-07 06:51:23 AM

untaken_name: Anastacya: //prepared for people to flame me

If that's a real profile picture, I'd "flame" you. Assuming I could get you to drink the roofies, of course.


It is a real picture. And who needs roofies when you have Ambien?
 
2012-02-07 07:08:52 AM

Anastacya: untaken_name: Anastacya: //prepared for people to flame me

If that's a real profile picture, I'd "flame" you. Assuming I could get you to drink the roofies, of course.

It is a real picture. And who needs roofies when you have Ambien?


Some women are immune to Ambien. :(
 
2012-02-07 07:10:54 AM
Oh my. She loves horses keeps a bunny at home and is an prairie dog advocate, so hot, so hot, but she loves her faux furs at burning man and her gasoline powered pickup truck. A living contradiction, she is. But hot, oh so hot.

/Hard to live in this place without being a hypocrite, really
 
2012-02-07 07:12:51 AM

violentsalvation: Why even make this argument about walmart? Anyone who doesn't at least somewhat dislike walmart is an idiot. They have murdered small merchants everywhere in America and filled our lives with cheap plastic crap.


Maybe that's because steel, clay, and wooden crap is too heavy and resource-intensive to make and maintain.
 
2012-02-07 07:14:39 AM
Luckily, I live in an area where I have a lot of other choices for shopping, so I don't shop at WalMart.

I don't think they're "evil", but I prefer to spend my hard earned money in my community, not with some corporate giant who doesn't really give a crap about the people in my city.
 
2012-02-07 07:19:09 AM

unlikely: Not that they pay better than Wally World, they just aren't actively creating poverty in the communities they enter.


I thought Trader Joe's pays livable wages to all their full-timers, and offer health insurance to part-timers? I'm not defending their products or general business practices, but it does seem they take care of their own people.

As to the question of why people don't ban Wal-Mart in favor of their local businesses, think about it this way. We're generally talking about small towns. People and families in small towns (again, in general) are low- to lower-middle income. When those types of people discover they can double their purchasing power shopping at Wal-Mart versus the locals... well, it's human nature to worry about ourselves and our families before we worry about the community.

If a family was used to buying clothes and toys at Goodwill or Salvation Army so they could afford groceries and hardware at the local shops - now they can buy all of those things brand-new and still be money ahead every month.
 
2012-02-07 07:24:09 AM
i expected more young pam dawber from this thread. fail.
 
2012-02-07 07:27:54 AM
TJ owners ALDI are literally a German version of Walmart. They've destroyed small towm Mom & Pop shops, are the largest company in Europe (by miles) without a workers council, force workers into unpaid overtime, don't allow unions either, have almost single handedly destroyed dairy farmers' profits. It's a long list. But you know....Wallyworld is evil.
 
2012-02-07 07:30:51 AM

violentsalvation: TheXerox: violentsalvation: Why even make this argument about walmart? Anyone who doesn't at least somewhat dislike walmart is an idiot. They have murdered small merchants everywhere in America and filled our lives with cheap plastic crap.

RTFA, the article states that REI did the same thing with several local outdoor apparel businesses in the Boulder area. Same applies to Trader Joe's, sure they have some neat stuff, but if you're in a town with a TJ's then you likely already have one or two local stores which already have an ample supply of weird stuff and aren't likely owned by a corporation.

REI might shut down a business or two when they come into town, but they won't shut down 20 by force-creating and then poorly filling those 20 voids.

Clothing, mens womens kids.
Jewelry
automotive
electronics
hobby craft stuff
toys
lawn and garden
power tools and simple home repair crap
hunting camping guns ammo paintball boating crap
pharmacy
photo
optometrist
salon
pet store
grocery bakery deli

Walmart has it hands in all that, probably more that I can't think of, and they do it all really poorly.



Another paid shrill (by the Kroger Corp). Everything you write is true of the Ames corp in the 1950's and 1960's. Too bad they failed, along with Sears (in the 1920's,) Kmart (in the 1960's) Toys-R-Us (in the 1980's,) Borders (in the 1990's,) . . . .

The writer makes very valid points of the hypocrisy of the left-over hippies in Boulder.
 
2012-02-07 07:32:55 AM

Lsherm: Because liberals hate Wal-Mart, so they're willing to be hypocrites about it. You can close as many local "mom and pop" shops as long as you are a store that liberals like. Hell, you can fark the worker over six ways from Sunday as long as liberals "like" your store. It's because most liberals don't actually have standards, instead they have a laundry list of emotional responses to external stimuli. Big store that puts locals out of business? BAD! Big store that puts locals out of business but sells Wasabi mayonnaise? GOOD! Why? Wasabi mayonnaise!

Liberals don't object to Wal-mart on any moral ground, they just think the store is cheap and they don't want to give poor people the option to shop there.


You are a moron.
 
2012-02-07 07:38:47 AM

ronaprhys: TheXerox: violentsalvation: Why even make this argument about walmart? Anyone who doesn't at least somewhat dislike walmart is an idiot. They have murdered small merchants everywhere in America and filled our lives with cheap plastic crap.

RTFA, the article states that REI did the same thing with several local outdoor apparel businesses in the Boulder area. Same applies to Trader Joe's, sure they have some neat stuff, but if you're in a town with a TJ's then you likely already have one or two local stores which already have an ample supply of weird stuff and aren't likely owned by a corporation.

REI represents a conundrum for me.

1 - I love the outdoors and have backpacked through the Grand Canyon, up portions of the AT, etc. I've purchased a very large amount of stuff from them and continue to do so (my wife, dog and I don't do much hiking-style camping, but we do go hiking all the time). Never buy stuff at full price from them, but their sales are generally very good and they seem to be a great place to get the lightweight and quality gear one needs for these activities.
2 - They tend to give money to charities that want to ban off-roading, something I also enjoy. I drove to Moab for a week of off-roading last year and am doing so again this year.

So the problem is that they support some of the activities I enjoy and want to help ban others I enjoy, all while having the gear I need.

As for Trader Joe's or any other retailer like that, you're correct - they all come in and put the squeeze on the local independents. In some instances we get better pricing, service, quality, and selection. In some we get better pricing and selection. In some, all suffer (WalMart).


My understanding is that the second activity destroys the ability to enjoy the first.
 
2012-02-07 07:42:27 AM
Sean Maher asks: Is Boulder hypocritical? Why yes, yes it is. Very much so. On this and just about everything else. The hypocrisies of Boulder could fill volumes.

Subby calls Boulderites "mountain hippies." Sorry, subby, all the real hippies were priced out of Boulder or fled in disgust years ago. What's left is an assortment of fake liberal fashionistas, self-righteous preachers of scientism, and yuppie hypocrites.

And Sean Maher speculates that many people may travel to Boulder to shop at the new Trader Joe's. Sorry, Sean. The roads are so sh*tty and so congested and so designed for the year 1973 that no one in their right mind who does not absolutely have to travel to Boulder for a life-or-death reason will not voluntarily subject themselves to your horrible soul-destroying traffic jams for any reason, even to shop at a Trader Joe's.
 
2012-02-07 07:43:20 AM
I could overlook most of Walmart's business practices if they could ever just ONCE construct a parking lot and access road that didn't send me into fits of rage before I even step foot in the store. As bad as they are as a business, I think Home Depot, Lowe's, Rite Aid/Walgreen have probably done more damage to "Main Street". I remember a lot more small hardware stores and pharmacies in my childhood.
 
2012-02-07 07:49:03 AM
Uh, because Trader Joe's is a good place to work (new window), has a normal-sized footprint, doesn't sell exclusively Chinese imports, and provides food that is hard to find for a decent price at other supermarkets?

Seriously, subby, were you dropped on your head as a small child?
 
2012-02-07 07:49:29 AM
Locally, Walmart wanted to locate a store in a historic bungalow community. There was an outcry, but they didn't ban the store. They worked it out to where the architecture of the store is at least an homage to the local area, looks bungolowish, and they planted lots and lots of greenspace around the store. I think it worked out.
 
2012-02-07 07:53:09 AM
I'm just here to say that I'm quite sure that I'm 1.7% better than you because I shop at Target.
 
2012-02-07 08:03:23 AM
Also, WalMart =/= Trader Joe's for one very simple reason:

Trader Joe's doesn't try and sell everything under the sun and try to eliminate every other shopping option in the local community. Same with REI. They're niche retailers, not broadband.

To move this from Colorado to Georgia, we were excited to get a TJ's here in Athens, but we're fighting the presence of a third WalMart - for a variety of reasons.

1) We're a small town, we don't need a third WalMart
2) We certainly don't want one that dominates the skyline of the eastern approach - the University's North Campus Parking Deck does that already, thankyouverymuch.
3) We've got a lot of small, local shops downtown that would suffer.
4) The town is not laid out well to handle the car traffic.
5) The site is right on top of a branch of the Oconee River, and runoff from the construction and parking lot would be murder on an already stressed ecosystem (we've had a nasty chemical spill or two in the past few years).

When it got here, TJ's took over an existing location away from downtown, in an area where traffic flows well.
 
2012-02-07 08:07:08 AM
I may never understand Trader Joe's. It's an overpriced, tiny grocery with bad hours and slow checkout service.
 
2012-02-07 08:07:56 AM
Because a "People of Trader Joe's" Website would be a boring pish posh of hipster dufusses and mom arms.
 
2012-02-07 08:13:09 AM

moothemagiccow: I may never understand Trader Joe's. It's an overpriced, tiny grocery with bad hours and slow checkout service.


I've found it to be none of those things, but OK
 
2012-02-07 08:15:15 AM

muck4doo: ....
It's also less choice. While one mom and pop type would carry a few different brands, and another others, Wal*Mart means we all get the same shiatty selection. That isn't how capitalism is supposed to work.


That is EXACTLY how capitalism is supposed to work.
 
2012-02-07 08:17:38 AM

ronaprhys: TheXerox: violentsalvation: Why even make this argument about walmart? Anyone who doesn't at least somewhat dislike walmart is an idiot. They have murdered small merchants everywhere in America and filled our lives with cheap plastic crap.

RTFA, the article states that REI did the same thing with several local outdoor apparel businesses in the Boulder area. Same applies to Trader Joe's, sure they have some neat stuff, but if you're in a town with a TJ's then you likely already have one or two local stores which already have an ample supply of weird stuff and aren't likely owned by a corporation.

REI represents a conundrum for me.

1 - I love the outdoors and have backpacked through the Grand Canyon, up portions of the AT, etc. I've purchased a very large amount of stuff from them and continue to do so (my wife, dog and I don't do much hiking-style camping, but we do go hiking all the time). Never buy stuff at full price from them, but their sales are generally very good and they seem to be a great place to get the lightweight and quality gear one needs for these activities.
2 - They tend to give money to charities that want to ban off-roading, something I also enjoy. I drove to Moab for a week of off-roading last year and am doing so again this year.

So the problem is that they support some of the activities I enjoy and want to help ban others I enjoy, all while having the gear I need.

As for Trader Joe's or any other retailer like that, you're correct - they all come in and put the squeeze on the local independents. In some instances we get better pricing, service, quality, and selection. In some we get better pricing and selection. In some, all suffer (WalMart).


Dunno about off roading, but my local REIs are pretty awesome if only because

1) sweet classes
2) decent volunteer events (I've done 3, had a good time at all)
3) the best goddamn return policy in the world
4) that % back I get at the end of the year

It's not entirely just about pushing out local business for me (and the local outdoor outfitters are still around and I'll pop in from time to time - they definitely cater to a certain customer and I ain't it) but also how they treat their employees and contractors. That's a major reason why I like Meijer over Walmart. The fact hat Meijer is local *and* awesome (*and* 24 hours) helps.
 
2012-02-07 08:20:31 AM

booksmart: When it got here, TJ's took over an existing location away from downtown, in an area where traffic flows well.


Yep. Trader Joe's over here took over for a Whole Foods when they moved on up. On the edge of town and with a lot, so I've never had a parking issue. Same thing a few towns over (they took over and empty storefront on a major road, *away* from downtown but close enough to bike it). Seems reasonable, although I'm not as in love with TJs as some.
 
2012-02-07 08:25:52 AM

Claude Ballse: Seriously, Ma and Pa shops ain't always all that great.


Most of them just don't want to compete. Wal-mart opens up and they still retain their weird hours because they won't hire somebody to work on sunday or from 5-9pm. Who the hell is shopping 9-5 weekdays or before noon on saturday? I'm either asleep or at work. Old people and kids can't have that much money.

There's a bakery near me whose survival I can't explain. It's 500 feet south of a Whole Foods, further from a busy intersection, and whole foods' bakery puts its selection to shame. farking place is closed every time I walk by, too.
 
2012-02-07 08:27:08 AM

Lsherm: Arf! Arf! Arf! Liberals! Arf! Arf! Liberals! Arf! Arf! Arf! Arf! Liberals! Arf! Arf! Arf!




That is what most so-called conservatives sound like to me nowadays.
 
2012-02-07 08:28:38 AM

moothemagiccow: There's a bakery near me whose survival I can't explain. It's 500 feet south of a Whole Foods, further from a busy intersection, and whole foods' bakery puts its selection to shame. farking place is closed every time I walk by, too.


Money laundering front?
 
2012-02-07 08:35:00 AM
This is a great way to write articles - give an opinion on behalf of people who may or may not exist and then call them hypocrites.
 
2012-02-07 08:42:25 AM
I try to avoid Trader Joe's just like I try to avoid the Walmart, but for entirely different reasons.

Though I did buy a new vacuum at the Walmart the other day, because I really have no idea where else I'd buy one around here.
 
2012-02-07 08:47:19 AM

Elandriel: I actually never shop at Walmart. One person crusades don't make much of a dent though. :|


I also never do normal grocery shopping and stuff at Walmart. That doesn't particularly mean I am able to shop at locally owned places...

At the local Walmarts I find the meat and produce selection awful, which is how I was able to convince my boyfriend to also stop shopping there. Other than the sneaky way they avoid giving their workers benefits and their low quality stuff I also avoid shopping there because a) the traffic is awful b) the people who shop there are fat/stinky c) there are always people selling puppies int he parking lot and d) the store is huge and crowded.
 
2012-02-07 08:47:58 AM
Because mushroom risotto.
 
2012-02-07 08:48:52 AM
What an absolutely moronic question.

1. TJ's is far smaller than Wal-Mart.
2. TJ's doesn't run local stores out of business.
3. TJ's pays their employees well, provides them with benefits, promotes fairly & doesn't require unpaid overtime.

That's just for starters. Kindly take your head out of your ass before posting.
 
2012-02-07 08:50:17 AM
He raises a valid point. However, there isn't 100 percent overlap between Trader Joe's and your local hippie food co-op. For one thing, the produce department and meat department at Trader Joe's are really lacking in selection compared even to a regular grocery store. What Trader Joe's specializes in is cheap, idiosyncratic packaged foods. E.g., $5 frozen pizzas imported from Italy. A frozen rack of lamb, prepared and ready to go in the oven. They also have a (small) selection of not-very-expensive fancy cheeses and cheap beer and wine. In most places where there is a Trader Joe's, you can find a Whole Foods peacefully coexisting nearby because they fill different niches.

Whole Foods is what your local food co-op really needs to worry about.
 
2012-02-07 08:51:40 AM

untaken_name: Ed Finnerty: untaken_name: TheJoe03: Do you have evidence that the "liberal" places like Trader Joe's or Ben and Jerry's partake in shady business practices?

I do. They're corporations. If nothing else, pretending that a company is a person and has the rights of a person while shielding the actual decision-makers from the consequences of their decisions is a pretty shady business practice.

I think you were asked for some type of citation, or evidence. Not just your own opinion on how words are defined.

That was sweet, though.

I provided evidence. Perhaps you're thinking of "proof". Those are different things. My evidence may or may not be persuasive, but it's certainly evidence....and thank you.


Hearsay and conjecture are kinds of evidence ~ Lionel Hutz
 
2012-02-07 08:57:49 AM

Ablejack: Trader Joe's is crap anyway. 2nd rate prepared foods leveraged by the biggest grocery conglomerate in the world Aldi (Albrecht Discount). Don't think that hokey "Captain and hawaiian shirt crew" garbage is anything other than making shopping a Disney experience for aging middle classes.
Trader Joe's is just a notoriously secretive corporation with an aggressive campaign that to buy from them makes you hip.
Even the famous Two Buck Chuck is a scam. Charles (Chuck) Shaw sold his eponymous winery in '91. It has been scooped up by Fred "All I care about is making money" Franzia and added to his glut of 40,000 acres, grandfathering in the name "Napa" where it is otherwise not permitted.
I also used to hate the fake "old timey" newspaper styled junk mail Trader Joe's would cram in my mailbox in Philly. Christ, do they still do that nonsense?


THIS!

How come nobody knows this? I would think the Wal-Mart haters would have jumped on this bandwagon. For the record, I hate Wal-Mart.

/I always new this, and I still love TJ's.
//mmmm.... Kool aid....
 
2012-02-07 09:04:37 AM
Trader Joe's Shopping List:

Korean BBQ Ribs (kinda pricey)
Dumplings
TJ chocolate-oreo knockoffs
White/Red/Yellow Onion combo sock
TJ Black Bean Dip and chips
Five $2 Chucks
Spicy California Rolls
TJ Chicken Enchiladas (awesome)
TJ Chicken Burrito
TJ Sumatra Blend coffee beans (red can)
Bunch of flowers
 
2012-02-07 09:05:38 AM
It's OK because free speech doesn't require logical speech.
 
M-G
2012-02-07 09:20:28 AM

unlikely: TJ's might compete with Safeway or Kroger or something, but they aren't going to pay any less to their bagboys. Not that they pay better than Wally World, they just aren't actively creating poverty in the communities they enter.


TJ's doesn't have bagboys. Their 'crew' members do every job in the store. And unlike WM, they pay decently and have good benefits.

Also, TJ's are small and fit into standard retail space, unlike WM, who demands tax subsidies to build their giant store, then leaves behind a giant wasteland when they go to a different location.
 
2012-02-07 09:22:52 AM
One difference: Wal-Mart makes a town appear trashy. It does. Its vast parking lots and accompanying strip-mall dollar stores are hideous to look at and encourage similar development around it. This would not be beneficial for a town like Boulder, which kinda prides itself on its yuppier appearance, with the small-city coffee shop and camping store and brick walkways thing.

A midwestern suburb, on the other hand? Sure, slap one down between the Kmart and the Macaroni Grill, I don't care.
 
2012-02-07 09:23:08 AM

Bealach: 2. TJ's doesn't run local stores out of business.


What is magically different about TJ's that they will take no business from existing stores when they open their doors?
 
2012-02-07 09:31:18 AM
Money.Cnn.com - Inside Trader Joe's (new window)

I'm not sure if this is the same story I submitted (As far inside Trader Joe's as you're likely to get without some rope, a flashlight, a mask, & a good set of lockpicks (my first green!) ), but it looks like it has some of the same info.
 
2012-02-07 09:32:27 AM
The mountain yuhippie's conundrum: Why is it okay to scream bloody murder whenever Walmart tries to build a store in your town, but you can't wait for the day Trader Joe's opens shop?

FIFTY
 
2012-02-07 09:33:40 AM
I love Trader Joe's. Wal-Mart can munch on my unwiped anus.
 
2012-02-07 09:36:42 AM
They opened a Walmart in my hometown.

Everyone died except me.
 
2012-02-07 09:36:44 AM

Bealach: What an absolutely moronic question.

1. TJ's is far smaller than Wal-Mart.
2. TJ's doesn't run local stores out of business.
3. TJ's pays their employees well, provides them with benefits, promotes fairly & doesn't require unpaid overtime.

That's just for starters. Kindly take your head out of your ass before posting.


The 3 reasons you mentioned don't even rank on your give-shiat meter.
People shop at Trader Joe's because it gives them the perception that they are better than the "scum" that shop at Wal-Mart.

And that is why they are successful. American corporations are great at exploiting the lack of self-esteem common in most Americans.

/Baa, Baa, Baa.
 
2012-02-07 09:41:42 AM
Y'know, the accusation that store like Walmart put "Mom & Pop" out of business is very one-sided.

M&Ps did well when they were the only game in town, but had no clue how to compete when Big Box stores moved in, which has been an inevitability for decades. I can sympathize with a store that didn't know what to do in 1980, but by now it should be abundantly clear that independent stores must:

A. Specialize & differentiate
B. Offer exemplary customer service
C. Hire knowledgeable staff
D. Develop a clientele
E. Compete on every level outside of price
F. ADVERTISE

I work for an independent store that has been hurt by the Big Box of our industry that opened a location just down the street. It has been like pulling hippopotamus teeth trying to get my bosses - who were the only game in town for 30 years - to alter their business model in response to the Big Box and the Internet. Changes come slowly, and are implemented half-ass, so when they don't work RIGHT NOW, those changes are abandoned.

Things used to be easier for Mom & Pop; but the world changed, and they either have to change in response to the market, or accept that they're going out of business. Change is in the nature of society and technology, and the engine of capitalism - innovate if you can, alter your business model if you can't, or pack up and go home.

Big Box stores *do* create value in the form of a more expanded selection and aggressive pricing, but they fall short when it comes to hiring thinking staff members (instead focusing on hiring those that conform to the corporate rules), they rarely get the kinds of products that are suitable for the individual stores' local markets, and all they have to offer is low prices.

But it's not enough for either kind of retailer to simply have inventory and expect to thrive - some form of extra value is necessary.
 
2012-02-07 09:48:50 AM

Lernaeus: A. Specialize & differentiate
B. Offer exemplary customer service
C. Hire knowledgeable staff
D. Develop a clientele
E. Compete on every level outside of price
F. ADVERTISE



ALL of which are LOADS easier to do when you have a large capital base from which to do it. Just sayin.'

I mean, sure, you can specialize into areas the Big Boxes wouldn't initially think of going, but chances are if there's enough of a significant regional market for those specializations to keep you afloat, the Big Box won't be very far behind in catching on. Just because they're a Big Box Chain doesn't mean the chain entirely IGNORES regional opportunities like that because they cannot under any circumstances change the stock in one or a few of their stores to take advantage of it.

They'll do it bigger, better, and likely cheaper than you could ever hope to. Money isn't everything, no. But it sure as hell helps.
 
2012-02-07 09:49:28 AM
Oh, and Boulder isn't a mountain town, either.

Chief Niwot's Curse (new window)

"People seeing the beauty of this valley will want to stay, and their staying will be the undoing of the beauty."
 
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