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(New Scientist)   Clint Eastwood helps reveal secrets of brain evolution. With a picture of what Clint Eastwood might look like if he was Eli Wallach   (newscientist.com) divider line 19
    More: Interesting, Clint Eastwood, evolution, brain evolution, PM ET  
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3113 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Feb 2012 at 11:01 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-02-06 10:31:52 AM  
What picture are you looking at subby? That's Clint, baby.
 
2012-02-06 11:04:09 AM  
But the brain doesn't evolve unless the tinfoil of Evolutionism keeps God out of its brainwaves. Or something.

/summon you-know-who
 
2012-02-06 11:04:41 AM  
I think those scientists got the idea for this study by watching "Every Which Way but Loose".
 
2012-02-06 11:32:35 AM  
right turn Clyde.
 
2012-02-06 11:35:13 AM  
HEY BLONDIE! YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE? JUST A DIRTY SON OF A AYAYAAAAAAAA
 
2012-02-06 12:09:20 PM  
Did they change the pic or is Subby just showing off his brain evolution?
 
2012-02-06 12:11:52 PM  
did they change the pic or am I missing the joke?

/GBU is my favorite western
 
2012-02-06 12:16:12 PM  
7 and Farked, yay us.
 
2012-02-06 12:30:54 PM  
Is it just me, or did Clint kind of sound like Yoda in that commercial yesterday?
 
2012-02-06 12:31:12 PM  
This is actually a major issue in neuroscience research that uses animal models. Humans didn't evolve from any species alive today - we share common ancestry. Which means that once the ancestral lineage split, each species continued to evolve in their particular niche. That would, and does, have much more drastic effects on neural ontogeny and phylogeny than a lot of modern researchers give thought to.

From the level of the macrostructures of the brain (e.g. the frontal lobes, the visual cortex), to the way down to the density and types of neurons at a particular location (e.g. pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex), to the way various neurotransmitters and hormones affect brain functioning (e.g. the rule of dopamine in memory formation), no matter how similar two species' brains are anatomically or functionally, that doesn't mean they are the same and we can learn about one with strong precision by studying the other primarily. Best case scenario is that animal models give us a highly probable and very likely idea of how things work in the human brain and can lead to the generation of new ways to study the actual human brain.

Don't get me wrong, animal models are necessary in neuroscience, medicine, and so on, but the take home lesson that some recent research has concluded is that we need to be very cautious in how we generalize findings from chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys to humans (and, for that matter, vice versa). Much more cautious than we have been in the last few decades.

Of course, I catch a lot of crap from my research colleagues for just how conservative I'm willing to draw conclusions in my research. So perhaps the view I have on this is a bit too stringent even for science.
 
2012-02-06 03:10:04 PM  

Kome: This is actually a major issue in neuroscience research that uses animal models. Humans didn't evolve from any species alive today - we share common ancestry. Which means that once the ancestral lineage split, each species continued to evolve in their particular niche. That would, and does, have much more drastic effects on neural ontogeny and phylogeny than a lot of modern researchers give thought to.

From the level of the macrostructures of the brain (e.g. the frontal lobes, the visual cortex), to the way down to the density and types of neurons at a particular location (e.g. pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex), to the way various neurotransmitters and hormones affect brain functioning (e.g. the rule of dopamine in memory formation), no matter how similar two species' brains are anatomically or functionally, that doesn't mean they are the same and we can learn about one with strong precision by studying the other primarily. Best case scenario is that animal models give us a highly probable and very likely idea of how things work in the human brain and can lead to the generation of new ways to study the actual human brain.

Don't get me wrong, animal models are necessary in neuroscience, medicine, and so on, but the take home lesson that some recent research has concluded is that we need to be very cautious in how we generalize findings from chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys to humans (and, for that matter, vice versa). Much more cautious than we have been in the last few decades.

Of course, I catch a lot of crap from my research colleagues for just how conservative I'm willing to draw conclusions in my research. So perhaps the view I have on this is a bit too stringent even for science.


*Fart noises*
 
2012-02-06 03:21:28 PM  
When you quote some morans 16 paragraph mental diarrhea why in dogs name can you not snip it off after the first couple of sentences and not make me have to scroll past all that babbling twice?
 
2012-02-06 03:22:14 PM  
I know if my brain was hooked up during TGTGTU, I'd light up like a Christmas tree from the moment Tuco finds the graveyard till the credits. Cinematic perfection.
 
2012-02-06 03:34:56 PM  

Ohlookabutterfly: When you quote some morans 16 paragraph mental diarrhea why in dogs name can you not snip it off after the first couple of sentences and not make me have to scroll past all that babbling twice?


You can't edit the text you're quoting on Fark mobile. Don't know if that's the case here.
 
2012-02-06 04:35:53 PM  
I thought Eastwood demonstrated brain evolution by endorsing McCain back in 2008 and then doing a commercial yesterday that only makes any logical sense if one would want Obama to have a "second half".
 
2012-02-06 04:40:25 PM  
A man's got to know his limitations.
 
2012-02-06 09:25:35 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: But the brain doesn't evolve unless the tinfoil of Evolutionism keeps God out of its brainwaves. Or something.

/summon you-know-who


img697.imageshack.us

He doesn't think it's nice, you laughin'. You see, you-know-who don't like people laughing. He gets the crazy idea you're laughin' at him. Now if you apologize, like I know you're going to, I might convince him that you really didn't mean to summon him.

:-/
 
2012-02-06 09:27:49 PM  
Heh... Add a superscript hyphen and that smiley really starts to fit the Clint picture.

:-/-

/bored
 
2012-02-07 04:47:49 PM  
If you're gonna shoot, shoot ... don't talk
 
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