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(Fark)   Subby is in the midst of his 5th distinct career change at age 36. Some have been more successful than others, but the journey overall has made for a pretty interesting life so far. Let's hear your career change stories   (fark.com) divider line 221
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1866 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jan 2012 at 2:30 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-27 09:53:03 PM  
I worked at McDonalds until I saved up enough to buy a car, then quit and delivered pizzas.
 
2012-01-27 09:54:53 PM  
I figured out what I enjoy doing and then started making lots and lots of money doing it.

Thank God for knee pads.
 
2012-01-27 09:55:11 PM  
I went from making chocolate to making pretzels to making airplanes.
 
2012-01-27 09:59:13 PM  
I'm currently a private lesson teacher in the Austin area and I'm thinking about either trying to seriously pursue being a professional classical musician (HAHA) or just saying screw it, and go back to school and do computer science or something like that.
 
2012-01-27 09:59:53 PM  
Uhhh... I dunno if it counts, but I've worked in restaurants/bars, outsourced IT services for hospitality, outsourced marketing and sales, customized bottle manufacuring, shipping, headhunting, used car sales, IT consulting. Oh and I booked concerts for a few venues, have done some audio production contracting, and have done some voiceover and interview stuff. Oh and I did college radio. When I was in college. Oh, and volunteer EMS dispatching, too.

I wonder what I can add to that list in the next five years?
 
2012-01-27 10:00:04 PM  
Student, half assed graphic designer, student, cheesemaker, call centre, deli, student, health care.
 
2012-01-27 10:00:31 PM  
I went from grad student to engineer. Yay.
 
2012-01-27 10:01:06 PM  
I was two years into college as a Psych major looking to become a lawyer, then I switched to Comp Sci and managed to squeeze in all the necessary courses to graduate on time.
 
2012-01-27 10:01:38 PM  
I'll let you know when it happens, 15 years in the same industry. The biggest leap I've made is from working for engineers on building restoration to construction supervision on heavy civil infrastructure projects. It's all the same though, just different scales.
 
2012-01-27 10:01:53 PM  
I went from writing business to writing sports to writing fiction.

And this is fascinating:

Staffist: I went from making chocolate to making pretzels to making airplanes.

 
2012-01-27 10:05:48 PM  

Quasar: I was two years into college as a Psych major looking to become a lawyer, then I switched to Comp Sci and managed to squeeze in all the necessary courses to graduate on time.


I'm glad you didn't get distracted by a bunny or the prospect of riding bikes.
 
2012-01-27 10:06:04 PM  
I imagine since I'll have to go back to work soon, I'll be starting a new career, but in what field, I have no idea.

Though, at heart, I've always wanted to be a monk.
 
2012-01-27 10:06:31 PM  
Hrm, I've never been at all distinct in my careers. I was a camp counselor in various camps until I graduated college. Also during college, I worked helldesk. I went on to be an IT trainer, specifically programming instruction, and I've been programming professionally for years (and eventually ditched training, because it's a shiatty job but a great fallback). It's all one continuous line for me, though- teaching first aid merit badge at a Boy Scout camp and being a member of an Agile team developing an app to meet SOX requirements is pretty much the same thing in my mind.
 
2012-01-27 10:06:50 PM  
i was having a career of malcontentedly starving my face off, and the spouse finally got it together and we got out to the local bbq pit and i decided to change paths and am now interneting as a well-fed content.

oh. and 2 cranberry vodaks.
 
2012-01-27 10:07:34 PM  
Pizza maker to electrician to home improvement guy to cabinet maker back to home improvement guy to property manager and hopefully some day back to cabinet maker. Unless I go to school, which I may do.
 
2012-01-27 10:08:24 PM  
If I stick around for three more years, I will have spent half my life (not just working life... life) working in the same office building that I started working in as an undergrad.

Probably one of many, many, MANY signs that I should find something else.
 
2012-01-27 10:08:29 PM  
Dropped out of journalism school, schlepped around the food service business for six years, saving a nest egg to have my own business. When microprocessor cash registers came along, I was a multi-unit general manager with a penchant for cash/inventory control systems, which up to then had been based on laborious paper spread sheets and calculators. As we began implementing the microprocessor systems, I realized that I understood the systems analyst's job better than he understood mine. Took the intro course in data processing at a local university, ran some numbers and found that I could pay for the rest of my degree from savings and barely support myself by bartending for a couple of years.

Finished the IS bachelor's, became a programmer, then a DBA, learning a number of OSes under the hood along the way. Client/server architectures came along, and I "got" networking immediately. Ended up as chief systems engineer for a state educational authority, with desktop, server, and network support reporting to me, along with information security. Waved off some offers from private industry, which looks like a really good move now that I'm two years from a defined benefit pension.

Because of health, I've stepped back into being an advanced server support subject matter expert, mapping out deployment scenarios and serving as level 4 support to the senior guys, a number of whom I recruited and mentored.

It's been a lot of fun. I could have made more money, but I'm comfortable and have no regrets.

And finally, I owe much of it to MrsMudgen, who got me through some dark times.
 
2012-01-27 10:09:16 PM  

shivashakti: I imagine since I'll have to go back to work soon, I'll be starting a new career, but in what field, I have no idea.

Though, at heart, I've always wanted to be a monk.


A beer making or cheese making monk?

They have some farming nuns around my town.
 
2012-01-27 10:09:44 PM  

FunkOut: I'm glad you didn't get distracted by a bunny or the prospect of riding bikes.


I've gotta be missing a reference here.
 
2012-01-27 10:10:47 PM  

FunkOut: They have some farming nuns around my town.


The best ones make fudge.
 
2012-01-27 10:11:51 PM  

Quasar: FunkOut: I'm glad you didn't get distracted by a bunny or the prospect of riding bikes.

I've gotta be missing a reference here.


Must be the ADHD.
 
2012-01-27 10:14:30 PM  

FunkOut: A beer making or cheese making monk?

They have some farming nuns around my town.



I'd love to be either. Or both, if possible.
However, that's not going to happen.

I once did a retreat at an abbey of nuns that made their own cheese. It was incredible. It was also a working dairy farm. The milk for the cheese was all their own and unpasteurized. Delicious.
 
2012-01-27 10:19:43 PM  

Marysue:

Thank God for knee pads.


You're a gardener?
 
2012-01-27 10:21:05 PM  

Mudgen: You're a gardener?


Both "planting" and "seeds" are involved.
 
2012-01-27 10:21:43 PM  
retail, jewelry design, bartending, secretary stuff, events stuff, now secretary stuff again but really desperate, low-end temp stuff. now i'm just trying to get married and maybe art a little.
 
2012-01-27 10:22:19 PM  

Marysue: Mudgen: You're a gardener?

Both "planting" and "seeds" are involved.


And a hoe.
 
2012-01-27 10:23:03 PM  

Quasar: Marysue: Mudgen: You're a gardener?

Both "planting" and "seeds" are involved.

And a hoe.


ok. that was kinda funny. kinda.
 
2012-01-27 10:23:44 PM  

jetzzfan: I went from grad student to engineer. Yay.


You'd think you'd figure out how to pay your debts.
 
2012-01-27 10:24:24 PM  
As a teenager I was working at a hospital and then a restaurant. Continuing the path in customer service/hospitality positions until I was 26 or so. Then I started developing skills in sales and doing tele-sales. The most boring and mind numbing job I've ever had. So far all I've done is CSR, Retail, and Sales positions. Now I'm going into real estate/leasing, but my true passion is being a Dietitian.

I've had an interesting path so far and I've seen some crazy stuff, but the jobs I've worked do not supply enough money nor do I wake-up in the morning happy every single day. When I get to that point, I will be ecstatic and glowing for years.

css
 
2012-01-27 10:24:40 PM  

logophile: ok. that was kinda funny. kinda.


Not bad.
 
2012-01-27 10:30:56 PM  

Hi I'm Lauren: I went from writing business to writing sports to writing fiction.

And this is fascinating:

Staffist: I went from making chocolate to making pretzels to making airplanes.


Not really. Worked my way through school in a chocolate factory and wound up managing it, was recruited by a pretzel company to manage a part of it, and then was recruited by an aerospace company to help implement some process improvements.
 
2012-01-27 10:32:50 PM  

Staffist: I went from making chocolate to making pretzels to making airplanes.


That's pretty much one of the most awesome sentences I have ever read.

Subby here...

Graduated law school '01 / music business creative & licensing '02-'07 / fulltime artist & knifemaker '08-'10 / restauranteur '10-'12

Had the best restaurant in a very small town of 10K heads. Won every award we could win, had a steady clientele, but the area couldn't support a decent restaurant.

At any rate, I have a friend who is a financial analyst for an oil company here in Texas and there are crazy opportunities due to a huge deposit that is supposed to produce for the next 15-20 years. I never thought in a million years that I would be doing this, but I am training for work in the oil fields. Going to be driving truck in the middle of nowhere, but the pay is very good and the cost of living is peanuts. I am actually looking forward to the adventure of it, which is probably some sort of sickness, but after working for myself for the last couple of years, I have learned how to do a lot with very little, and the fear of the unknown excites me.

In an awesome turn of events, my best friend was a general contractor in Southern California, which as you can imagine, has basically been a hand-to-mouth existence since around 2008. I told him about this gig and he packed up his shiat and moved out here to go through this too. It's cool to be in these weird-ass south Texas towns going through this otherwise mundane training with somebody with whom I can actually relate.

Enjoying your stories so far - would love to see more.
 
2012-01-27 10:34:11 PM  
I had myself a respectable suit wearing career and then decided I wanted to travel and started doing random part time jobs and bartending, waiting tables, whatever. Now I work for myself. Love it.
If you don't like what you're doing, do something else.
 
2012-01-27 10:36:02 PM  

Marysue: logophile: ok. that was kinda funny. kinda.

Not bad.


Shouldn't you be at work by now?
 
2012-01-27 10:44:03 PM  
Accountant, help desk for accounting software, bum (loved that one), responsible for my grandmother & her dementia (worst one), substitute teaching, now back in school.
 
2012-01-27 10:53:21 PM  

mayberebecca: retail, jewelry design, bartending, secretary stuff, events stuff, now secretary stuff again but really desperate, low-end temp stuff. now i'm just trying to get married and maybe art a little.


Get your art on. Seriously. As much as possible. My happiest creative friends do VERY good work on the side. Some of us sell work direct to clients at prices that are a bargain for the buyer and a boon to the artist - minus the middle man. The rest just have some of insanely dope decorations for their own homes. Either way they are winning. You still doing jewelry or something else?
 
2012-01-27 11:19:52 PM  

Pesky_Humans: mayberebecca: retail, jewelry design, bartending, secretary stuff, events stuff, now secretary stuff again but really desperate, low-end temp stuff. now i'm just trying to get married and maybe art a little.

Get your art on. Seriously. As much as possible. My happiest creative friends do VERY good work on the side. Some of us sell work direct to clients at prices that are a bargain for the buyer and a boon to the artist - minus the middle man. The rest just have some of insanely dope decorations for their own homes. Either way they are winning. You still doing jewelry or something else?


still jewelry right now. I'm super lucky to be in a situation where I've got time-to-learn coming up so I've been thinking about either trying to expand to resins or try out screenprinting.
 
2012-01-27 11:48:10 PM  
Ahhh. . . screen printing. Love it so.
 
2012-01-28 12:22:00 AM  
I was a damn-fine waitress at a pooshie-bucks restaurant in downtown Atlanta that's no longer there. I'd gone to a Scottish festival and noticed that all the jewelry was crappy crappy. My girlfriend Patter told me that I could make bettter stuff that we saw, and I liked the idea. She lassoed me into going to Georgia State with her, she was a printmaker. I signed up for one class, and she literally pushed me in through the Jewelry/Metalworking 101. I was 10 years older than any kid in that class, but I paid attention, learned how to make metal behave the way I wanted to, and I never looked back. I've had my jewelry designs in movies and books, and sold it all over the world. Sure, I did odd jobs too, during the slow times, but nothing compared to the art of designing.

And then I found Fark and it all went down the toilet. No, seriously, 25 years later I've retired and never regretted one minute of it all.

Especially the money.
 
2012-01-28 12:37:50 AM  
I have been, at various times, a street sweeper, a gardener, an animal keeper, a fireman (volunteer, so it probably doesn't count for this list), a cowboy, a tree trimmer, an actor, a writer, a repo man, a teacher, a construction worker, a waiter, a soldier, and several versions of IT guy.
 
2012-01-28 12:57:50 AM  
After graduating, accountant, HR benefits manager, mostly senior management/financial since then. Been at current job for 9 years in February. It is good, a lot of variety, unlike previous jobs. I don't have to supervise too many people and get to research stuff in depth for short periods. Some last longer.

Since being there I have researched and studied the following:

Wireless internet service provider
wind farm
high voltage transmission lines
organic pasta plant
greenhouses from irrigation
alternative energy
hardware stores
grocery stores
land speculation
coal-bed methane
master tourism plan
arts & crafts store
environmental consulting company
community beautification
for profit health care centre
traditional land use studies
building a new college
irrigation farming
forage processing and export
ammonite mining and marketing
community radio and tv
aquaculture
innovative housing
geomatics
eco-tourism
business bylaws and licensing
property management
road-surfacing products
organizational structures
tax planning
RTM housing
rural public transport
too much other shiat too silly to mention or to work too hard on

Some projects last longer than others, and a lot of them I know are dead ends before I start working on them. I've been working on the wind farm for nine years now, but it is nice to learn about different things and get paid for it. Sometimes I think they send me on wild goose chases just so they won't have to hear from me for a while. Plus, next year I will be getting 25 days of annual leave per year. I wouldn't mind getting paid more, but it is nice.
 
2012-01-28 02:29:40 AM  
Dive instructor
Pizza Delivery
Bar Tender
Flight Instructor
CPA
 
2012-01-28 02:34:45 AM  
yeah see I never understood the whole "change of careers" thing, if you have a paycheck coming in you should be farking grateful for that alone

not "happy" in your job or not "satisfied?" or whatever? welcome to the club neither is anyone else, suck it up grow a pair and get back to work and do your damn job, doesn't matter if it's flipping burgers or whatever, a job is a job

not being paid enough? suck it up and grow a pair and learn to live with less, you're not ENTITLED to sleep on a pile of money

nowhere anywhere does it say we have a RIGHT to happiness
 
2012-01-28 02:35:05 AM  
Gold miner
Bartender
Poker Dealer

currently 59
Retired at 55
 
2012-01-28 02:36:08 AM  
I've found that about half of all people end up in their job through chance.

Me, I'm a Female Body Inspector.
 
2012-01-28 02:37:33 AM  

Marysue: Mudgen: You're a gardener?

Both "planting" and "seeds" are involved.


Do you need a matching lobster bib?
 
2012-01-28 02:41:34 AM  
Pet store sales clerk
Diplomat
Project management for enterprise systems
 
2012-01-28 02:42:24 AM  
Basically the only reason I'm in grad school is because I resigned my co-op to avoid a drug test and I wanted to bury that fiasco as far under my resume as I could.
 
2012-01-28 02:42:59 AM  
I started out as a teacher--graduate teaching assistant in grad school and then taught jr. and sr. high at a private school but lost that job when it merged with another private school.

Got into commercial bill collections for a commercial leasing company, but left after two years as it was turning me into a mean SOB, having to deal with deadbeats all the damn time.

Got into insurance claims, mostly workers comp, for 20 years. got laid off due to companies closing local offices, flat out going out of business and down sizing. Looked for work for a year but found the guys interviewing me were 10-15 years younger than I and uncomfortable hiring a guy pushing 50 who had more experience than they.

Then I heard the local school district was in need of substitute teachers and got hired in a flash for that. I've been doing that now for 12 years and working weekends as front desk/security for an upscale retirement community for 7 years.
 
2012-01-28 02:43:13 AM  
Hate to break it to you dude, but moving from the deep fryer to the grill does not count as a "distinct career change".
 
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