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(The Moveable Fest)   Mel Gibson on Tom Hardy getting his blessing to play Mad Max: "Sure. It's fine. Knock yourself out. I've got better things to do." Like Russian models   (moveablefest.com) divider line 56
    More: Misc, Mad Max, Mel Gibson, Fury Road, TMZ on TV, Truman Capote, better things to do, final cut, Tina Turner  
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4158 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 25 Jan 2012 at 4:22 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-26 08:48:50 AM

Slaves2Darkness: skink: James Scameron: Mad Mad Mad Mad World


[www.threestooges.net image 600x235]

The Three Amigos frown on your shenanigans!

I thought The Three Amigos was a sad comedy by three washed up actors, who are these bozos?


Three guys way past their prime, forced to do a treadmill script due to financial circumstances and contractual obligations.

/sad to see Moe and Larry like that
 
2012-01-26 09:44:17 AM

James Scameron: i think Tom Hardy is a very talented actor.
But...

the Mad Max franchise died with "Beyond the Blunderdome" .
To reboot it in the day and age of CGI with a number of the main icons from the first and second film gone like the Interceptor and Mad Mel himself, you are left with another Blunderstruck.

With Blunderhole, the Segio Leone tone of the Road Warrior was replaced with an almost "El Topo for kids" style camp, the Interceptor was gone and the character of the gyro Captain was addressed as if everyone had some kinda of amnesia..
While the Train bit had some real "John Ford" feel to it, it was to the Mad Max trilogy what Return of The Jedi was to Star Wars;

A poorly made cash grab cobbled together from bits and pieces of the other films.

So, if we learn anything from the film history of "extended trilogies", if the third one sucks, the fourth will suck more, be it a prequel, sequel, nyquil or whatever...

Just leave it alone. I'd rather see "Babe the Talking Vengeful Pig" than to have what memories Blunderdroll almost ruined crushed into the ground even further.

/don't get me started on Akira...
//Blame George Lucas



I didn't think Thunderdome was that bad, although I agree it had a completely different character from the prior films. Of course the Interceptor wasn't featured, as it got blowed up in The Road Warrior. And the pilot in Thunderdome wasn't the same character as the gyro captain in The Road Warrior - although they inexplicably used the same actor, Bruce Spence, who has a fairly distinctive face. That's one of those little details that make Thunderdome inferior to the other two films, I guess, because the audience is left asking, "WTF? Why doesn't Max recognize his old buddy from the last movie?"

Thunderdome had some really great elements. I like the idea of Bartertown and the Master-Blaster character(s), and even the colony of lost children wasn't a bad idea. But it really wasn't on par with the other two - I do think, like you, they were trying to make some money off the franchise, when closure really wasn't needed to Max's story.
 
2012-01-26 10:18:58 AM

ebell: James Scameron: i think Tom Hardy is a very talented actor.
But...

the Mad Max franchise died with "Beyond the Blunderdome" .
To reboot it in the day and age of CGI with a number of the main icons from the first and second film gone like the Interceptor and Mad Mel himself, you are left with another Blunderstruck.

With Blunderhole, the Segio Leone tone of the Road Warrior was replaced with an almost "El Topo for kids" style camp, the Interceptor was gone and the character of the gyro Captain was addressed as if everyone had some kinda of amnesia..
While the Train bit had some real "John Ford" feel to it, it was to the Mad Max trilogy what Return of The Jedi was to Star Wars;

A poorly made cash grab cobbled together from bits and pieces of the other films.

So, if we learn anything from the film history of "extended trilogies", if the third one sucks, the fourth will suck more, be it a prequel, sequel, nyquil or whatever...

Just leave it alone. I'd rather see "Babe the Talking Vengeful Pig" than to have what memories Blunderdroll almost ruined crushed into the ground even further.

/don't get me started on Akira...
//Blame George Lucas


I didn't think Thunderdome was that bad, although I agree it had a completely different character from the prior films. Of course the Interceptor wasn't featured, as it got blowed up in The Road Warrior. And the pilot in Thunderdome wasn't the same character as the gyro captain in The Road Warrior - although they inexplicably used the same actor, Bruce Spence, who has a fairly distinctive face. That's one of those little details that make Thunderdome inferior to the other two films, I guess, because the audience is left asking, "WTF? Why doesn't Max recognize his old buddy from the last movie?"

Thunderdome had some really great elements. I like the idea of Bartertown and the Master-Blaster character(s), and even the colony of lost children wasn't a bad idea. But it really wasn't on par with the other two - I do think, like ...


Besides that I thought it was some weird comment on children leaving the paradise of their small communities to go live in the hell holes that are the big cities lured there by false dreams and glitzy lights.
 
2012-01-26 11:34:46 AM
Beyond Thunderdome is my favorite of the three and I'm not ashamed to say it. No, the final chase scene isn't as good as The Road Warrior, and yes, using Bruce Spence to play a different character was not a wise choice. But I loved Bartertown. Tina Turner, not the best of actresses, made a good villainess. Master/Blaster was also a good character. I loved the contrast between Bartertown and the Lord of the Flies oasis where the kids lived. I think it really explored the whole post-apocolyptic world in a whole new way. I'm glad they didn't just try to repeat what they did in the first two. Glad, I tells you.

Slaves2Darkness: Besides that I thought it was some weird comment on children leaving the paradise of their small communities to go live in the hell holes that are the big cities lured there by false dreams and glitzy lights


That's how I interpreted it.
 
2012-01-26 12:20:50 PM

You'd turn it off when I was halfway across: may be misremebering, but I'm pretty sure that the war has already happened and society has totally broken down before the start of the second film, with the survivors fighting over the remaining resource.


i think the war has happened before Mad Max, and society is in the process of breaking down piece by piece, even when we watch that movie. My take on it is that Max, having lost all he cared for that tied him to what remained of society, heads off into the wastelands where it has ceased to exist entirely. I'm not sure that implies that society on the coasts completely breaks down or if it keeps limping along... although the end shot of the 3rd movie seems to follow your reasoning, with them living in the burned out remnents of a major city
 
2012-01-26 01:36:37 PM

gunga galunga: Beyond Thunderdome is my favorite of the three and I'm not ashamed to say it. No, the final chase scene isn't as good as The Road Warrior, and yes, using Bruce Spence to play a different character was not a wise choice. But I loved Bartertown. Tina Turner, not the best of actresses, made a good villainess. Master/Blaster was also a good character. I loved the contrast between Bartertown and the Lord of the Flies oasis where the kids lived. I think it really explored the whole post-apocolyptic world in a whole new way. I'm glad they didn't just try to repeat what they did in the first two. Glad, I tells you.


That's what made Beyond Thunderdome awesome for me. It had that whole mythical exploration of the new world and the new rules.

I think it's a pretty accurate description of what would happen if the world ended tomorrow. It also serves to show that maybe the same cycle has happened before. No, I'm not a wacko nutso Age of Aquarius guy, but hey, entertaining the thought is...well...interesting.

All in all, the series will forever be tied to pop culture due to its incredible influence on all things post-apocalyptic. You can see it from such disparate works like Hokuto no Ken / Fist of the Northstar to the Fallout games.

Max on steroids:
 
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