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(Politico)   Obama deciding to side with the people on SOPA/PIPA somehow makes it a political issue, which is apparently unfair to Hollywood. Subby would play the world's tiniest violin for them, but then Fark would have its DNS revoked   (politico.com ) divider line
    More: Asinine, obama, PIPA, Hollywood, Ari Emanuel, Hollywood moguls, democratic groups, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Leo Hindery  
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2029 clicks; posted to Politics » on 19 Jan 2012 at 8:36 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-19 04:11:59 PM  
Only if you played a tune that is under copyright. However, since now apparently works in the public domain can be recopyrighted (recopywritten?), you can never really know if you're allowed to play something unless you've payed somebody for the privilege.
 
2012-01-19 04:26:51 PM  
"We've donated a ton of money to Democrats to support this issue, it would be a shame if this suddenly dried up. And also, don't make it a political issue"

-former Senator Chris farking Dodd, official spokesman for the MPAA who they hired a long time ago for this

/bad Democrats drive me up a tree. Namely Senators from Connecticut
//Jury is out on Blumenthal, not sure how I feel about him yet
 
2012-01-19 04:57:36 PM  

SnakeLee: //Jury is out on Blumenthal, not sure how I feel about him yet


Met him. Seemed like a nice guy (his was well-known as a consumer advocate during his stint as the attorney general). But his support of PIPA leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
 
2012-01-19 05:01:21 PM  
Wait, so you mean Obama is saying he can't be bought off?

Wow, I just gained a whole bunch more respect for this guy.
 
2012-01-19 05:12:12 PM  
"So we'll instead support the people who blame us for society's ills!"

Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight....
 
2012-01-19 05:18:40 PM  
FTFA: "[The bill] is an issue that has no business being decided politically - by anybody on one side or the other - and the fact that it might be becoming a political issue is unfair to the content producers," said Hindery, who's contributed more than $3 million to Democratic candidates and groups.

Yeah, how dare Obama actually declare a stance on the issue! Who does he think he is, the President?
 
2012-01-19 05:20:30 PM  

RexTalionis: SnakeLee: //Jury is out on Blumenthal, not sure how I feel about him yet

Met him. Seemed like a nice guy (his was well-known as a consumer advocate during his stint as the attorney general). But his support of PIPA leaves a bad taste in my mouth.


He's also taken quite a bit of movie money. If it comes up to a vote, he's probably a yes.
 
2012-01-19 05:20:34 PM  
unfair to the content producers,

There's a lot of content producers who would say SOPA is unfair to them.
 
2012-01-19 05:40:53 PM  
I'll believe Obama's opposed to these bills when he actually vetoes them....
 
2012-01-19 05:43:10 PM  
Laugh now.
When all the movie stars and rock stars endorse Mitt Romney this fall we'll see who the joke is really on.
 
2012-01-19 05:47:41 PM  

SnakeLee: "We've donated a ton of money to Democrats to support this issue, it would be a shame if this suddenly dried up. And also, don't make it a political issue"

-former Senator Chris farking Dodd, official spokesman for the MPAA who they hired a long time ago for this


I just hope that the masses are paying attention to shiat like this and Colbert's mockery of PACs and Citizen's United.
 
2012-01-19 05:48:46 PM  
Does this mean that Breitbart is going to suddenly love the Hollywood Elite again?
 
2012-01-19 05:59:45 PM  

WhyteRaven74: There's a lot of content producers who would say SOPA is unfair to them.


I like what Neil Gaiman wrote regarding this that many "content producers" also put their names to.

new window

Also, the entertainment industry survived the VCR, DVDs, cassette tapes (I remember my friends and I would decide who would buy which new album, and then everyone else would give blank tapes to the others so we'd all have copies of the albums), Mp3s, iPods.... they're not going anywhere.

And if they think they are losing money due to piracy, perhaps they should look at their business models and all the restrictions they put on the content that people purchase. People don't particularly like buying things they don't own. If I go to Ikea and buy a bookshelf and want to give my old one to my friend, Ikea doesn't get on my case about that -- even if I technically, maybe cost them money since my friend would otherwise have still wanted a bookshelf had I not passed my old one along. I bought the shelf and can do what I like with it.
 
2012-01-19 06:47:45 PM  

doczoidberg: I'll believe Obama's opposed to these bills when he actually vetoes them....


Bingo was his name-o.
 
2012-01-19 06:55:59 PM  
Damn liberals, always in cahoots with ultra-liberal Hollywood elite.

Wait a minute....
 
2012-01-19 07:10:19 PM  

serpent_sky: Also, the entertainment industry survived the VCR, DVDs, cassette tapes


I always like to point out that the print industry never had to bother with this kind of crap. Only with e-readers did they even get into DRM at all.

A book, once digitized either via somebody typing in their copy or using OCR software, is probably 0.5-1.0MB. That's been an easily transferable amount of data since the early 90's. Somehow they survived that dark period without getting all legal on every body. Mostly, I think it's because they provided a product that people were actually willing to pay for. The product had value.

The record industry could have headed off Napster and the other P2P music trading systems if they had just offered up tracks for sales for 75 cents a pop back in 1997 when the MP3 format made flipping these files around on dialup a possibility. Instead they stomped their feet and refused to adapt until 2001 or so.

The movie industry is just doing the same thing, though they appear to be adapting quicker. The bandwidth and codecs for movie piracy have only been around for maybe 8 years. Now they're permitting VOD rentals through stuff like Amazon for a reasonable price which is good.

If these yahoos would just have the foresight to get into digital distribution when the people are ready for it, instead of reacting after piracy of their works is common, they'd be in a much better spot.
 
2012-01-19 07:15:52 PM  

jbuist: A book, once digitized either via somebody typing in their copy or using OCR software, is probably 0.5-1.0MB. That's been an easily transferable amount of data since the early 90's. Somehow they survived that dark period without getting all legal on every body. Mostly, I think it's because they provided a product that people were actually willing to pay for. The product had value.


I had a notion the other day about this. The book industry kinda figured it out with the readers but one day we may only have candle light again. It occurred to me to start collecting books, real books, and paper and all. Might come in handy someday.

/for the candle light days to come..:)
 
2012-01-19 07:20:54 PM  

GaryPDX: jbuist: A book, once digitized either via somebody typing in their copy or using OCR software, is probably 0.5-1.0MB. That's been an easily transferable amount of data since the early 90's. Somehow they survived that dark period without getting all legal on every body. Mostly, I think it's because they provided a product that people were actually willing to pay for. The product had value.

I had a notion the other day about this. The book industry kinda figured it out with the readers but one day we may only have candle light again. It occurred to me to start collecting books, real books, and paper and all. Might come in handy someday.

/for the candle light days to come..:)


Good luck getting the candles though :)
 
2012-01-19 07:25:33 PM  

netweavr: Good luck getting the candles though :)


That's easy, the fat of zombies. Or subby's mom.
 
2012-01-19 07:33:20 PM  

jbuist: The record industry could have headed off Napster and the other P2P music trading systems if they had just offered up tracks for sales for 75 cents a pop back in 1997 when the MP3 format made flipping these files around on dialup a possibility. Instead they stomped their feet and refused to adapt until 2001 or so.


And that is why they are in the "situation" they are in right now. By not adapting to (a) what the people wanted and (b) realizing the market was changing drastically. By ignoring these facts, they essentially created the pirate environment that they now complain about.

I find it hard to believe that movie pirating is all that prevalent, by comparison. People like DVDs, most people still go to theatres, Netflix, RedBox, Amazon, and AppleTV all make it affordable and easy to stream movies or watch them on DVD. Nevermind that most people have hundreds of cable channels. Why bother with a questionable torrent when there are so many affordable and legal avenues to obtain the content?

The one thing I'd do differently is shorten the time between the end of a TV season and the DVD release. I can see how people who don't have channels like HBO or Showtime would not want to wait the approximate year to watch the show if they're watching series on DVD. Something like "Homeland" should come out in a month or two, if they want to profit, since there is so much good buzz about the show, and the whole Golden Globes thing.
 
2012-01-19 07:58:40 PM  

GaryPDX: I had a notion the other day about this. The book industry kinda figured it out with the readers but one day we may only have candle light again. It occurred to me to start collecting books, real books, and paper and all. Might come in handy someday.


ecx.images-amazon.com

The history is a little spotty, but the title is catchy, and it's an interesting read.
 
2012-01-19 08:39:59 PM  

doczoidberg: I'll believe Obama's opposed to these bills when he actually vetoes them....


Do signing statements count as a Veto?
 
2012-01-19 08:42:15 PM  

netweavr: GaryPDX: jbuist: A book, once digitized either via somebody typing in their copy or using OCR software, is probably 0.5-1.0MB. That's been an easily transferable amount of data since the early 90's. Somehow they survived that dark period without getting all legal on every body. Mostly, I think it's because they provided a product that people were actually willing to pay for. The product had value.

I had a notion the other day about this. The book industry kinda figured it out with the readers but one day we may only have candle light again. It occurred to me to start collecting books, real books, and paper and all. Might come in handy someday.

/for the candle light days to come..:)

Good luck getting the candles though :)


Fark candles. Stock up on incandescent bulbs and potatoes.
 
2012-01-19 08:48:46 PM  
I like how Politico gets input from the CEO of the RIAA. Yeah, he's totally going to give an objective answer, and is in no way biased, even though the RIAA spearheaded SOPA and PIPA.
 
2012-01-19 08:53:30 PM  
In other words: don't make us sic the AIPAC machine on you.
 
2012-01-19 08:59:07 PM  
Hmmm, so they argue that Obama should side with Hollywood's ~$10 billion yearly revenue over the tech industry with $741 billion yearly revenue. How dumb can you be? Granted, politics shouldn't be about money, but don't pick fights in an arena where you are clearly outclassed, here by 7410%.

And what, Barbara Streisand is going to start donating to Republican's over this? Really?
 
2012-01-19 09:00:41 PM  

Captain_Ballbeard: In other words: don't make us sic the AIPAC machine on you.


files.sharenator.com

THA JOOOOS, really?
 
2012-01-19 09:01:25 PM  
unfair to Hollywood

too gdamn motherf*cking bad -- go cry me a river when you all have trouble making rent. what a bunch of selfish twits overestimating their worth in the country. citizens can go without seeing the next Ben Dover/Tom Cruise movie but not without heating their houses and buying food and that just tears them up inside. assholes, one and all.

all these sponsors and pushers of SOPA/PIPA have rocks in their head. they don't want compromise, they want what they want regardless of how it affects anyone else.
 
2012-01-19 09:02:41 PM  

MyRandomName: netweavr: GaryPDX: jbuist: A book, once digitized either via somebody typing in their copy or using OCR software, is probably 0.5-1.0MB. That's been an easily transferable amount of data since the early 90's. Somehow they survived that dark period without getting all legal on every body. Mostly, I think it's because they provided a product that people were actually willing to pay for. The product had value.

I had a notion the other day about this. The book industry kinda figured it out with the readers but one day we may only have candle light again. It occurred to me to start collecting books, real books, and paper and all. Might come in handy someday.

/for the candle light days to come..:)

Good luck getting the candles though :)

Fark candles. Stock up on incandescent bulbs and potatoes.


Incandescent potatoes? What will they think of next?!
 
2012-01-19 09:13:02 PM  

serpent_sky: jbuist: The record industry could have headed off Napster and the other P2P music trading systems if they had just offered up tracks for sales for 75 cents a pop back in 1997 when the MP3 format made flipping these files around on dialup a possibility. Instead they stomped their feet and refused to adapt until 2001 or so.

And that is why they are in the "situation" they are in right now. By not adapting to (a) what the people wanted and (b) realizing the market was changing drastically. By ignoring these facts, they essentially created the pirate environment that they now complain about.

I find it hard to believe that movie pirating is all that prevalent, by comparison. People like DVDs, most people still go to theatres, Netflix, RedBox, Amazon, and AppleTV all make it affordable and easy to stream movies or watch them on DVD. Nevermind that most people have hundreds of cable channels. Why bother with a questionable torrent when there are so many affordable and legal avenues to obtain the content?

The one thing I'd do differently is shorten the time between the end of a TV season and the DVD release. I can see how people who don't have channels like HBO or Showtime would not want to wait the approximate year to watch the show if they're watching series on DVD. Something like "Homeland" should come out in a month or two, if they want to profit, since there is so much good buzz about the show, and the whole Golden Globes thing.


That's the rub right there. A few hours after a television episode airs it's up on the web for free, without commercials, with quality similar to a television.

Why the hell would I want to wait months to pay $60 for a season of shows (that will be half that price a month or two later) and will take me 5-10 minutes to flip through all the commercials and screens to play the damn episodes?

No one should wonder why there is piracy, but everyone should wonder why these industries don't want to evolve.
 
2012-01-19 09:13:54 PM  

incendi: However, since now apparently works in the public domain can be recopyrighted (recopywritten?), you can never really know if you're allowed to play something unless you've payed somebody for the privilege.


How does that not commit Ex Post Facto!?
 
2012-01-19 09:14:11 PM  

A Dark Evil Omen: Captain_Ballbeard: In other words: don't make us sic the AIPAC machine on you.

[files.sharenator.com image 533x800]

THA JOOOOS, really?


Anyone else see that image and see Jerry Gergich from Parks & Rec?
 
2012-01-19 09:17:14 PM  
How much you bet this is a ploy to get everyone all pissy and liking SOPA/PIPA just because "Fartbongo" hates it?

\typing that left a bad taste in my mouth...
 
2012-01-19 09:18:14 PM  
"[The bill] is an issue that has no business being decided politically - by anybody on one side or the other - and the fact that it might be becoming a political issue is unfair to the content producers," said Hindery, who's contributed more than $3 million to Democratic candidates and groups.

So the 'content producers' get to create mechanisms to reengineer controls on what americans are allowed to see on the internet and this is not political?

But when people get upset and let their senators and representatives know how they feel about it it is political?

This is just too farked up. These 'content producers' need that guy from No Country for Old Men to put their egos in check.
 
2012-01-19 09:18:38 PM  

make me some tea: Wait, so you mean Obama is saying he can't be bought off?

Wow, I just gained a whole bunch more respect for this guy.


Sounds more like he's speaking out of both sides of his mouth. I still don't trust him.

Someone somewhere else on the internet put it like this. Congress offers a bill consisting of A+B+C. A is bad. B- is worse, C is SOPA. Everyone gets outraged about SOPA and they take that out to placate everyone while they get their A and their B. without much discussion.

A few months later C gets tacked on to a "must=pass" bill - something like highway funding or military defense.
 
2012-01-19 09:20:03 PM  
I'm still waiting for someone to prove that the amount of piracy currently occurring negatively effects consumers.

Unless Big Content can prove this to be true, congress shouldn't be allowed to pass the law.
 
2012-01-19 09:22:41 PM  

Happy Hours: Someone somewhere else on the internet put it like this. Congress offers a bill consisting of A+B+C. A is bad. B- is worse, C is SOPA. Everyone gets outraged about SOPA and they take that out to placate everyone while they get their A and their B. without much discussion


Except, in this case, SOPA/PIPA are standalone bills. They're right there on the Internet. They're not riders. There is no A and B
 
2012-01-19 09:22:52 PM  
Yes, but, are both sides bad?

And should I therefore vote Republican?
 
2012-01-19 09:25:58 PM  
I'd rather have the tech industry, and their customers behind me than Hollywood who just has money and little influence over their customers. Obama made a good choice here.
 
2012-01-19 09:26:23 PM  
More Democrats than Republicans are still SOPA supporters, as you can see in this image.

This post pn the liberal FireDoglake tells you why. "The Tea Party has struck fear into their party; the progressive movement inspires laughter."
 
2012-01-19 09:40:41 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: Happy Hours: Someone somewhere else on the internet put it like this. Congress offers a bill consisting of A+B+C. A is bad. B- is worse, C is SOPA. Everyone gets outraged about SOPA and they take that out to placate everyone while they get their A and their B. without much discussion

Except, in this case, SOPA/PIPA are standalone bills. They're right there on the Internet. They're not riders. There is no A and B


Exactly. Everybody is so pissed off at Obama for signing a giant needed bill with a couple of bad things in it but the Republicans, who put the bad things in the bill, skate. There is absolutely no talk of them. The left is easy to play, I guess.
 
2012-01-19 09:48:07 PM  

MrEricSir: I'm still waiting for someone to prove that the amount of piracy currently occurring negatively effects consumers.

Unless Big Content can prove this to be true, congress shouldn't be allowed to pass the law.


A quick google search finds a bunch of studies by the japanese that claims that piracy improved sales with anime.

Link (new window)

Food for thought.
 
2012-01-19 09:50:14 PM  
Hollywood pulls this power grab attempt and my bet is that no one will make them pay (loss of sales) for this insanity.
So they will learn that as long as they keep trying, there will be no serious long term repercussions.
One day the Interwebs will be locked down like a prison elementary school and more than a couple people will want to do something about it too late.
 
2012-01-19 09:51:12 PM  

Sabyen91: cameroncrazy1984: Happy Hours: Someone somewhere else on the internet put it like this. Congress offers a bill consisting of A+B+C. A is bad. B- is worse, C is SOPA. Everyone gets outraged about SOPA and they take that out to placate everyone while they get their A and their B. without much discussion

Except, in this case, SOPA/PIPA are standalone bills. They're right there on the Internet. They're not riders. There is no A and B

Exactly. Everybody is so pissed off at Obama for signing a giant needed bill with a couple of bad things in it but the Republicans, who put the bad things in the bill, skate. There is absolutely no talk of them. The left is easy to play, I guess.


Well, I think we should hold the Dems to a better standard than the Republicans. Being useless, destructive, thieving corporate whores is the Republican platform. I'd like to think we can rationally hold the Dems responsible for their actions.
 
2012-01-19 09:53:28 PM  

A Dark Evil Omen: Sabyen91: cameroncrazy1984: Happy Hours: Someone somewhere else on the internet put it like this. Congress offers a bill consisting of A+B+C. A is bad. B- is worse, C is SOPA. Everyone gets outraged about SOPA and they take that out to placate everyone while they get their A and their B. without much discussion

Except, in this case, SOPA/PIPA are standalone bills. They're right there on the Internet. They're not riders. There is no A and B

Exactly. Everybody is so pissed off at Obama for signing a giant needed bill with a couple of bad things in it but the Republicans, who put the bad things in the bill, skate. There is absolutely no talk of them. The left is easy to play, I guess.

Well, I think we should hold the Dems to a better standard than the Republicans. Being useless, destructive, thieving corporate whores is the Republican platform. I'd like to think we can rationally hold the Dems responsible for their actions.


Just look at the right wing trolls in this thread. They are eating it up. In the end, Dems gets blasted and the Repubs get a new talking point and we end up with another 2010 where good solid liberals stay home because they are too stupid to understand reality.
 
2012-01-19 09:58:01 PM  
Obama being against SOPA and PIPA doesn't mean he's in favor of pirating! Isn't it more than likely that he's against pirating, but doesn't think these bills will be workable or effective, while causing more grief than they're worth?

No, he's probably a big torrent freak who hates media conglomerates and wants to steal all their money because that's what fascist, atheist, Kenyan, muslin, socialists do for fun.
 
2012-01-19 09:58:55 PM  

Sabyen91: A Dark Evil Omen: Sabyen91: cameroncrazy1984: Happy Hours: Someone somewhere else on the internet put it like this. Congress offers a bill consisting of A+B+C. A is bad. B- is worse, C is SOPA. Everyone gets outraged about SOPA and they take that out to placate everyone while they get their A and their B. without much discussion

Except, in this case, SOPA/PIPA are standalone bills. They're right there on the Internet. They're not riders. There is no A and B

Exactly. Everybody is so pissed off at Obama for signing a giant needed bill with a couple of bad things in it but the Republicans, who put the bad things in the bill, skate. There is absolutely no talk of them. The left is easy to play, I guess.

Well, I think we should hold the Dems to a better standard than the Republicans. Being useless, destructive, thieving corporate whores is the Republican platform. I'd like to think we can rationally hold the Dems responsible for their actions.

Just look at the right wing trolls in this thread. They are eating it up. In the end, Dems gets blasted and the Repubs get a new talking point and we end up with another 2010 where good solid liberals stay home because they are too stupid to understand reality.


Well, I'll say again what I said in the other thread: The Dems are getting blasted for it because they're not getting out in front of it. The Republicans are making a conscious effort, having been just as dick-deep in it as any California Democrat, to make themselves look like the good guys. The Dems are farking around. We can carry water for them until the cows come home but if they're going to demonstrably fail on policy, and not even make an effort to get the messaging right, it's not going to work even if solid liberals all turn out.
 
2012-01-19 10:00:03 PM  

HellRaisingHoosier: serpent_sky: jbuist:
No one should wonder why there is piracy, but everyone should wonder why these industries don't want to evolve.


Because old people don't like to change. They don't want to make money in other ways or have to wait longer for the same money. Innovation costs money upfront.
 
2012-01-19 10:01:43 PM  

A Dark Evil Omen: Well, I'll say again what I said in the other thread: The Dems are getting blasted for it because they're not getting out in front of it. The Republicans are making a conscious effort, having been just as dick-deep in it as any California Democrat, to make themselves look like the good guys. The Dems are farking around. We can carry water for them until the cows come home but if they're going to demonstrably fail on policy, and not even make an effort to get the messaging right, it's not going to work even if solid liberals all turn out.


Hell, both side are split on this issue. It might as well be non-partisan. If it weren't Hollywood and some other giant business the right would be for it and the left against. This way we can see which ones are paid for. The Dems that are for it and the Reps that vote against it.
 
2012-01-19 10:04:45 PM  

Sabyen91: A Dark Evil Omen: Well, I'll say again what I said in the other thread: The Dems are getting blasted for it because they're not getting out in front of it. The Republicans are making a conscious effort, having been just as dick-deep in it as any California Democrat, to make themselves look like the good guys. The Dems are farking around. We can carry water for them until the cows come home but if they're going to demonstrably fail on policy, and not even make an effort to get the messaging right, it's not going to work even if solid liberals all turn out.

Hell, both side are split on this issue. It might as well be non-partisan. If it weren't Hollywood and some other giant business the right would be for it and the left against. This way we can see which ones are paid for. The Dems that are for it and the Reps that vote against it.


Well, no, this is a bipartisan farkup. Which is why the Repubs can get away with getting out ahead of it in spite of having been slurping on it just last week like the cure for cancer was in there. they couldn't exactly do that with something that was all on them. It's blatant farking lying, but there you are.
 
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