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(Gothamist)   Contrary to what the hipsters will tell you, the NYC of the 1980s was a farking shiathole (and here's pictorial proof)   (gothamist.com) divider line 259
    More: Obvious, NYC, Gothamist, Brooklyn Bridge, human feces, 12th Street, live better, public space, Philip Glass  
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25694 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jan 2012 at 12:31 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-19 08:13:42 AM

Jack Black 62: CapnBlues:

what's a cretin?

A stupid, obtuse, or mentally defective person. You know, a New Yorker.


ooooh. thanks!

(been seeing this bandied about on the 'nets, and I didn't know what anyone meant by it)
 
2012-01-19 08:16:26 AM

b2theory: FlashHarry: i first visited manhattan in 1989. over the next two decades or so, i visited a couple of dozen more times. each visit, it was less scuzzy and more upscale. to the point where, in my last visit three years ago, it was unrecognizable. it's kind of sad, actually.

It's still a shiathole. The rent just went up. Then again, where else are self-important rich kids from the Midwest going to play Sex In the City?


When I was a teenager around 1980-82 I used to go to NYC and hang out with my cousin, who was doing a psychiatric residency at Bellevue. I met some fascinating people handcuffed to the gurneys there. The whole place was like visiting another planet.

What amazes me about NYC nowadays is the uneasy relationship between filth and luxury. A few years ago I was living in the upper east side (cheap waaay east end), but worked in Central Park in the low 70s, so I'd be cutting across increasingly nice blocks every morning. You know things are getting better when you start to see doormen or janitors outside buildings with a hose spraying hobo spit and dog shiat smears off the sidewalk before they start polishing the brass caps on the fire hose outlets.
 
2012-01-19 08:16:51 AM
New York's alright ...if you like saxophones.
 
2012-01-19 08:18:26 AM

Jamdug!: Most hipsters were either not born yet or in diapers when those photographs were taken.


Queue the "That's the Joke" pic. Hipsters (like a lot of youngsters) take a rosy-eyed view of the past that they only experience via stories, movies and other media. Of course in reality, they would avoid such places as they exist now (not too many hipsters in the real inner-city).
 
2012-01-19 08:25:15 AM

HotWingConspiracy: I don't get it, why would a hipster say this? Are just shoehorning in the word hipster every time NYC is mentioned?


This is FARK, a hipster here is anyone who has slightly differing tastes then you.
 
2012-01-19 08:27:24 AM
Kind of goes to emphasize the fact that, other than bombing, rent control is the fastest way to destroy an urban area.
 
2012-01-19 08:32:07 AM

zunkus: HotWingConspiracy: I don't get it, why would a hipster say this? Are just shoehorning in the word hipster every time NYC is mentioned?

This is FARK, a hipster here is anyone who has slightly differing tastes then you.


i've said it before and i'll say it again. On fark, the hipster hate comes down to:

i195.photobucket.com

Young people, possibly financially comfortable enough to not need full-time wage-slave jobs, having a lot of fun with their lives, resented by wage slaves who bred too young or got into too much debt and now need to work their asses off and protect their credit ratings and honda civics.
 
2012-01-19 08:39:08 AM

Znuh: Amtrak coming out of Baltimore (Heading North): You won't believe the sheer number of scary empty buildings. Totally like the Bronx back in the day.


You can get that in Bridgeport, Conn.
 
2012-01-19 08:47:23 AM

Mock26: Name any city in the world and I am sure that a google image search could turn up 14 recent pictures that would make that city look like a farking shiathole.


I tried several, but all I got were repeated shots of skylines. Searching recent (last week was my only option) resulted in mainly sports related pictures.
 
2012-01-19 08:53:43 AM

SDRR: forgotmydamnusername: SDRR: downtownkid: ....Yes, gentrification is inevitable. But this is a thriving urban neighborhood that has such a rich history that is being homogenized. The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born, this place is becoming a repurposed upscale shopping mall.

That is certainly worthy of comment.


NYC was a shiat hole, it's better now, nice place to visit once a decade. You're a farking douchebag, punk rock was in no way, shape, or form born in the United States, let alone NYC.

Go pretend you know what you are talking about in another thread.

Where was it invented then? Just curious...

Well, first it was not "invented" anywhere, more like evolved, mostly in the form of bands full of limeys from the UK from the music scene / atmosphere there in the late 60's/early 70's. Detroit played just as big, if not bigger part in early Punk evolution than NYC. NYC did play a big role in the evolution of Punk, but it certainly wasn't "born" there. That is a huge over-simplification that is just flat out not accurate.

Unless you are from NYC and think everything, ever, attributes its existence to NYC.



Wow, this is a special day. After looking long and hard I finally found him, the world's biggest asshole.

Listen up, slapdick, you may learn a thing or two. Anyone with any knowledge of musical history, especially those who were making the history, will tell you that Punk was born in NYC. Sure there were outliers that popped up here and there, and Punks influences come from all over. But Detroit? Please. The band Death actually played something pretty closely approximating hardcore punk music but no one really heard them until much later. MC5 had some of the attitude but weren't there musically. Iggy and the Stooges got close but were basically ignored.

There was a rebellious spirit in music as long as music has been played. If you are a pretentious, know-it-all jackass you can argue all day that punk was really born in Detroit, or 60's England, or with Eddie Cochran in the '50's, and so on and so on back to Mozart and even earlier. You would be wrong, and an insufferable douche, to do so. Sort of like you are.

Punk was born in NYC when bands like the Dolls and The Ramones formed a real scene for the first time. It took it's name from "Punk" magazine, published out of a storefront off the Bowery. It had it's home at CB's. Early tours of the UK by those same groups are what inspired the Pistols, the Clash and The Damned to form, really solidifying the movement. The only people who claim otherwise are the sort of pretentious twats who use words like "limeys".

Take your bullshiat and peddle it somewhere else as you don't know fark all that you think you do.
 
2012-01-19 09:13:54 AM
Yeah the yuppie scum screwed up the city. That's why they are called scum.
 
2012-01-19 09:20:26 AM

b2theory: FlashHarry: i first visited manhattan in 1989. over the next two decades or so, i visited a couple of dozen more times. each visit, it was less scuzzy and more upscale. to the point where, in my last visit three years ago, it was unrecognizable. it's kind of sad, actually.

It's still a shiathole. The rent just went up. Then again, where else are self-important rich kids from the Midwest going to play Sex In the City?


Chicago.
 
2012-01-19 09:31:46 AM
I never understood the nostalgia for how NYC "used to be". I mean, I miss the innovative music and art scenes of the late 70s - early 80s, but the city was a shiathole. In the early 80s I used to walk from Penn Station to my job at Rock Center via Times Square. I remember the crack vials crunching under my feet and stepping over the hookers sleeping on the sidewalk. This past summer I walked alone through Thompkins Square Park at 3 am. Back then, I, or anyone else, wouldn't DREAM of doing that. Do I miss CBGB? Sure, but I don't miss having to walk in a pack of 5 people to go there, just to ensure that we wouldn't be attacked. Say what you will about "gentrification", I will take todays Manhattan in a minute. (and the music and art scenes are still there, you just have to look a little harder)
 
2012-01-19 09:33:04 AM

SmitetheRighteous: Am I to understand there's actual nostalgia for crime-ridden, concrete, urban death-maze hellholes?


Only from the occupants who were left behind and made NYC into a festering hellhole.
 
2012-01-19 09:36:08 AM

downtownkid: The reality is that it used to be much more edgy and frontier. For example, there were very few decent first run cinemas. I mean, they were around but you had to travel to them. There were, however, all the Times Square grind houses. Formerly grand movie palaces fallen into extreme disrepair. Double features were five bucks and consisted of a first run action film like "They Live" and some awful B movie like "Death Row Game Show". You could smoke joints and bring your own beer to the theatre, but the floor was wet and sticky and there was a funky odor to the places. There were repertory theaters showing indie films all over town. So it was more primitive and dangerous but also much more interesting.


Now we have netflix and free porn. Truly, ours is an age of wonders.

\Incidentally, it was these that killed Time Square as much as any Disneyfication. Vice came home.
 
2012-01-19 09:47:20 AM
Patti Smith sucks.
 
2012-01-19 09:49:31 AM
Plato's Retreat

that is all
 
2012-01-19 09:49:36 AM

Znuh: The toughness of the streets was a great filter for people who lacked the mettle to live here. And the low cost of living meant that artists could work on their art, people could pursue all kinds of personal dreams without worrying about whether they'd be financially rewarding, and you couldn't walk down a street downtown without running into a friend, a party or a happening of some kind, whether a loft party or an oil drum barbeque.


This theme reminds me of the attitudes of Sartre and de Beauvoir, who regarded the primary difficulty of the Nazi occupation of Paris as how difficult it made hosting parties.

We miss your oil drum barbeques, but not at the price of another couple hundred dead people per annum.
 
2012-01-19 09:51:08 AM

Deadfeznt: thanks for cleaning up the city rudyEd

/too bad you went nuts


FTFY.
 
2012-01-19 09:51:35 AM

llevrok: I lived and worked there then. What a pit! Too many bloated unions, politicians, rent controls, corrupt cops. Say what you will about Rudy, but he rallied the town and made some "revisions" that had to be done.

If you miss the 1980's NY today, visit Philly.


Philly is more like early-90s NYC.
Baltimore is 80s NYC.
 
2012-01-19 09:51:55 AM

FlashHarry: i first visited manhattan in 1989. over the next two decades or so, i visited a couple of dozen more times. each visit, it was less scuzzy and more upscale. to the point where, in my last visit three years ago, it was unrecognizable. it's kind of sad, actually.


yeah civilization is lame
 
2012-01-19 09:53:47 AM
 
2012-01-19 09:54:23 AM

This text is now purple: llevrok: I lived and worked there then. What a pit! Too many bloated unions, politicians, rent controls, corrupt cops. Say what you will about Rudy, but he rallied the town and made some "revisions" that had to be done.

If you miss the 1980's NY today, visit Philly.

Philly is more like early-90s NYC.
Baltimore is 80s NYC.


wow. i never thought of it like this, but you are 100% right. Baltimore is scary fun, Philly is cheap but getting gentrified. I'd say Cleveland is sort of a new 1980's NYC, too. Go to the right neighborhood in cleveland and you'll have a blast. Little Italy for example, though I wouldn't go there unless you're white or passing.
 
2012-01-19 10:00:21 AM

CapnBlues: zunkus: HotWingConspiracy: I don't get it, why would a hipster say this? Are just shoehorning in the word hipster every time NYC is mentioned?

This is FARK, a hipster here is anyone who has slightly differing tastes then you.

i've said it before and i'll say it again. On fark, the hipster hate comes down to:

[i195.photobucket.com image 456x352]

Young people, possibly financially comfortable enough to not need full-time wage-slave jobs, having a lot of fun with their lives, resented by wage slaves who bred too young or got into too much debt and now need to work their asses off and protect their credit ratings and honda civics.


I think "you're a hipster" is sometimes (especially in regards to art, music, food) the new "you think you're better than me" which of course has always been "I think you're better than me."

The accuser is displaying his self-esteem issues regarding his taste. He's saying, "I'm insecure about my interests." This is frequently coupled with "oh so it's cool to hate popular things" which belies the realization that the accuser understands he may only be liking things because they are popular.

The point is, don't call anyone a hipster. It says more about you than them.
 
2012-01-19 10:01:50 AM

Jack Black 62: thamike: Jack Black 62: It still is a shiathole.

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 320x240]

It's definitely not made for wandering cretins.

That is interesting, since cretins make up the majority of the population.


NYC is unlikely to have much in the way of cretins, for a variety of reasons.
 
2012-01-19 10:04:03 AM

downtownkid: SDRR: forgotmydamnusername: SDRR: downtownkid: ....Yes, gentrification is inevitable. But this is a thriving urban neighborhood that has such a rich history that is being homogenized. The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born, this place is becoming a repurposed upscale shopping mall.

That is certainly worthy of comment.


NYC was a shiat hole, it's better now, nice place to visit once a decade. You're a farking douchebag, punk rock was in no way, shape, or form born in the United States, let alone NYC.

Go pretend you know what you are talking about in another thread.

Where was it invented then? Just curious...

Well, first it was not "invented" anywhere, more like evolved, mostly in the form of bands full of limeys from the UK from the music scene / atmosphere there in the late 60's/early 70's. Detroit played just as big, if not bigger part in early Punk evolution than NYC. NYC did play a big role in the evolution of Punk, but it certainly wasn't "born" there. That is a huge over-simplification that is just flat out not accurate.

Unless you are from NYC and think everything, ever, attributes its existence to NYC.


Wow, this is a special day. After looking long and hard I finally found him, the world's biggest asshole.

Listen up, slapdick, you may learn a thing or two. Anyone with any knowledge of musical history, especially those who were making the history, will tell you that Punk was born in NYC. Sure there were outliers that popped up here and there, and Punks influences come from all over. But Detroit? Please. The band Death actually played something pretty closely approximating hardcore punk music but no one really heard them until much later. MC5 had some of the attitude but weren't there musically. Iggy and the Stooges got close but were basically ignored.

There was a rebellious spirit in music as long as music ...


HAHA, you have made it clear you fall into the "you are from NYC and think everything, ever, attributes its existence to NYC category" and your diatribe dismissing and minimizing everything "punk" that wasn't focused on NYC proves that.

To say Punk was born in NYC is a gross oversimplification, but you're entitled to your opinion however myopic it may be.
 
2012-01-19 10:04:57 AM

Fubegra: res_nihil: Just wait a while...it'll come back around again-

[www.coverbrowser.com image 420x700]

A fun bit of trivia: Most of "Escape from New York" was shot in East St. Louis, IL. The bridge scene was shot on the Chain of Rocks Bridge over the Mississippi River, once part of old Rt. 66.

East St. Louis is still a hole.


Curiously, "Trespass" starring Ice Cube, Ice T, and Bill Pullman which was a ripoff of Treasure of the Sierra Madre was supposed to take place in East St. Louis but was actually filmed in the abandoned and rundown Fulton Cotton Mill building in Atlanta. Now it's lofty lofts and condos.
 
2012-01-19 10:05:02 AM
I remember the magic that was New York City two decades ago..... Oh what a great place. I went there a couple of times :

One time I went there with my high school friend. We took the subway and went all over the city.We went to the old Times Square and it was a magically porn filled place. xxx-booths, bars, and drugs. We also visited The Village and a few other places like the Empire State Building and Wall Street.
Another time I took a girl there in high school. I used the money I made from a summer job, and we saw Les Miserable on Broadway and ate at a fancy French restaurant.
 
2012-01-19 10:07:06 AM

Rapmaster2000: I think "you're a hipster" is sometimes (especially in regards to art, music, food) the new "you think you're better than me" which of course has always been "I think you're better than me."

The accuser is displaying his self-esteem issues regarding his taste. He's saying, "I'm insecure about my interests." This is frequently coupled with "oh so it's cool to hate popular things" which belies the realization that the accuser understands he may only be liking things because they are popular.

The point is, don't call anyone a hipster. It says more about you than them.


I think it's not dissimilar from calling someone an elitist.
 
2012-01-19 10:11:05 AM

Mildot: You're YOUR Welcome

[www.issues2000.org image 375x524]


Pet peeve
 
2012-01-19 10:11:29 AM

CapnBlues: This text is now purple: llevrok: I lived and worked there then. What a pit! Too many bloated unions, politicians, rent controls, corrupt cops. Say what you will about Rudy, but he rallied the town and made some "revisions" that had to be done.

If you miss the 1980's NY today, visit Philly.

Philly is more like early-90s NYC.
Baltimore is 80s NYC.

wow. i never thought of it like this, but you are 100% right. Baltimore is scary fun, Philly is cheap but getting gentrified. I'd say Cleveland is sort of a new 1980's NYC, too. Go to the right neighborhood in cleveland and you'll have a blast. Little Italy for example, though I wouldn't go there unless you're white or passing.


Cleveland and Detroit are slightly different. Even scary NYC had a solid foundation of wealth, and could more or less support its own infrastructure. For all its horrors, Baltimore has a surviving industrial base and active port and Philadelphia has a wealth of strong colleges and medical technology companies. They have an underlying strength they can use to support improvement.

Detroit and Cleveland cannot. They have shrunk to the point that they cannot support themselves. Unlike NYC, they have nothing to leverage to return to glory. If they cleaned up the dregs, there'd be nothing left at all.

Both may ultimately survive in some form, but they won't be as Detroit and Cleveland. I don't mean that in the way NYers use it, where the city isn't the same. I mean that Detroit and Cleveland may only survive by de-annexing vast swaths of their former city limits back into township or independent cities -- sort of like if Manhattan survived the 80s by breaking up the Five Boroughs back into its former separate constituent cities.
 
2012-01-19 10:14:38 AM

Rapmaster2000: Curiously, "Trespass" starring Ice Cube, Ice T, and Bill Pullman which was a ripoff of Treasure of the Sierra Madre was supposed to take place in East St. Louis but was actually filmed in the abandoned and rundown Fulton Cotton Mill building in Atlanta. Now it's lofty lofts and condos.


Assault on Precinct 13, set in Detroit, was filmed in Toronto, which was a much nicer city.

However, Vanishing on 7th St was filmed in Detroit, because you can shoot apocalyptic visions of an uninhabited city in broad daylight by just shooting downtown in Detroit. You don't even need to block streets off.
 
2012-01-19 10:24:38 AM

geekbikerskum: I was in NYC a couple of years ago to change buses while traveling from Boston to D.C. on the cheap. It really did look like a Disneyfied version of its former self.

I used to play in NYC back in the 80s. Yes, it was an unlivable shiathole. OTOH, the scariness of it kept most of the boring suburbanites out. (Except for me.) And things were a lot more interesting then, in good ways as well as bad. Commercial rents were a lot more affordable so there were lots of funky little shops and ethnic places and boutiques, not all of which were upmarket. Residential rents were affordable so four guys who were all struggling musicians or artists or whatever and had shiatty day jobs working in food service or retail could share a loft that doubled as practice space. There was lots of room for other groups of people who had been marginalized by society in one way or another and who had come to NYC to do their thing. I used to love to shop at second-hand clothing stores in the East Village, went out clubbing (Danceteria, Mars, Red Zone, Underground, Limelight, Pyramid), ate out at all sorts of odd little places.

All of that's gone now. As the children and grandchildren of the people who fled the city for the suburbs recolonize the city, they're bringing suburban boringness and sterility with them. Plus, the internet has brought various niche cultures to middle America. Now there's very little in NYC that I couldn't get in a suburban mall, or order off the internet. Why bother?

Maybe I'm just being overly-nostalgic for my youth. But then, there are still people who want to be musicians, or artists, or whatever, and who want to collaborate with others like them. There are still groups who are marginalized in society as well, and who want to be somewhere that'll accept them or at the very least where the neighbors will leave them alone and not judge them. Where do all those people go, now that our cities have become playgrounds for the rich?


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 
2012-01-19 10:26:07 AM

siskokid888: I never understood the nostalgia for how NYC "used to be". I mean, I miss the innovative music and art scenes of the late 70s - early 80s, but the city was a shiathole. In the early 80s I used to walk from Penn Station to my job at Rock Center via Times Square. I remember the crack vials crunching under my feet and stepping over the hookers sleeping on the sidewalk. This past summer I walked alone through Thompkins Square Park at 3 am. Back then, I, or anyone else, wouldn't DREAM of doing that. Do I miss CBGB? Sure, but I don't miss having to walk in a pack of 5 people to go there, just to ensure that we wouldn't be attacked. Say what you will about "gentrification", I will take todays Manhattan in a minute. (and the music and art scenes are still there, you just have to look a little harder)


It's because certain people have defined themselves as "weird," and rage against the world for not validating their uniqueness. They'd rather someone make a "place" for them rather than adapt to the circumstances of their life.

Yes, for a couple hundred thousand people in those days, NYC was not so bad, and pretty fun, mainly because these people aren't bothered nearly as much by the odor of piss, shiat and vomit as the rest of the population is, not bothered by being broke and on their ass nearly constantly, nor are they bothered by others invading their privacy on a regular basis. There's nothing inherently wrong with that; the problem is that it doesn't work when 7.5 million people are living in one spot. It makes others slightly stabby.

Most people want to live in a quiet(er), clean(er), safe(r) mode of existence without having to constantly worry about putting food on the table. That may come at odds with people who do not value such things as much. Most of us grow up and realize that we're the ones who have to adapt our own circumstances to the world around us. Some people don't, unfortunately.
 
2012-01-19 10:29:56 AM

Somacandra: Yeah, I remember it back in the 80's. It could definitely be a tough place, especially on the Lower East Side. Then it became all gentrified and disney-fied, especially mid-Manhattan. I just wish there could be more of a happy medium, y'know? Are the choices really between scary-ass place or saccharine tripe?


Portland's wondering the same thing. I grew up in Boise-Eliot but found myself in Tulsa. Went back to my old neighborhood and couldn't believe I came across a Whole Foods, and the old bread factory's going to be a New Seasons. Because, you know, people struggling to make rent in one of the cheapest parts of town have twelve bucks to blow on organic bananas.
 
2012-01-19 10:34:17 AM

dericwater: Is that Lieutenant Dan?


You know, there's something about this picture...
i.imgur.com

I think I recognize that guy in the middle...
topnews.in

So now we know where gandalf hung out during the 80's.
 
2012-01-19 10:37:47 AM

This text is now purple: Philly is more like early-90s NYC.


Camden still rivals the South Bronx for bleakness and danger
 
2012-01-19 10:51:05 AM

freewill: Nope. Look at the lanes. Too short. I'm almost certain that's a dead Who.


The Westside Highway had 10 foot lanes, same as a residential side street. There's a reason trucks weren't allowed on it. It was basically a glorified boulevard, but even boulevards have wider lanes.
 
2012-01-19 10:51:19 AM
I don't know why everybody is thanking Giuliani for New York being the way it is now. He was just the Mayor in office when the change happened, it would have happened during his time in office regardless who the mayor was.

From how I was told, New York, being the gateway to America and for a lot of foreigners the first city they think about when they think of the U.S, had become an embarrassment in the 70's and 80's. The government decided to dump tons of money into the city to clean it up, fix the infrastructure, and put more cops on the streets. When the corporations saw the government making this investment they decided also to invest, and buy land in the city. Once this started happening the developers started buying buildings in some of the blighted neighborhoods and rehabbing them. The result is the New York you see today.

Giuliani really didn't have anything to do with it, as mayors before him were trying to get this to happen, he was just the man in office when the government decided it was time to make it happen.
 
2012-01-19 10:52:51 AM

SDRR: downtownkid: SDRR: forgotmydamnusername: SDRR: downtownkid: ....Yes, gentrification is inevitable. But this is a thriving urban neighborhood that has such a rich history that is being homogenized. The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born, this place is becoming a repurposed upscale shopping mall.

That is certainly worthy of comment.


NYC was a shiat hole, it's better now, nice place to visit once a decade. You're a farking douchebag, punk rock was in no way, shape, or form born in the United States, let alone NYC.

Go pretend you know what you are talking about in another thread.

Where was it invented then? Just curious...

Well, first it was not "invented" anywhere, more like evolved, mostly in the form of bands full of limeys from the UK from the music scene / atmosphere there in the late 60's/early 70's. Detroit played just as big, if not bigger part in early Punk evolution than NYC. NYC did play a big role in the evolution of Punk, but it certainly wasn't "born" there. That is a huge over-simplification that is just flat out not accurate.

Unless you are from NYC and think everything, ever, attributes its existence to NYC.


Wow, this is a special day. After looking long and hard I finally found him, the world's biggest asshole.

Listen up, slapdick, you may learn a thing or two. Anyone with any knowledge of musical history, especially those who were making the history, will tell you that Punk was born in NYC. Sure there were outliers that popped up here and there, and Punks influences come from all over. But Detroit? Please. The band Death actually played something pretty closely approximating hardcore punk music but no one really heard them until much later. MC5 had some of the attitude but weren't there musically. Iggy and the Stooges got close but were basically ignored.

There was a rebellious spirit in music as ...



That's right, you pedantic asshole, get your ass handed to you in a discussion and scurry away while attempting to save face by being dismissive. Sure you are used to that by now.
 
2012-01-19 11:04:37 AM

downtownkid: SDRR: downtownkid: SDRR: forgotmydamnusername: SDRR: downtownkid: ....Yes, gentrification is inevitable. But this is a thriving urban neighborhood that has such a rich history that is being homogenized. The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born, this place is becoming a repurposed upscale shopping mall.

That is certainly worthy of comment.


NYC was a shiat hole, it's better now, nice place to visit once a decade. You're a farking douchebag, punk rock was in no way, shape, or form born in the United States, let alone NYC.

Go pretend you know what you are talking about in another thread.

Where was it invented then? Just curious...

Well, first it was not "invented" anywhere, more like evolved, mostly in the form of bands full of limeys from the UK from the music scene / atmosphere there in the late 60's/early 70's. Detroit played just as big, if not bigger part in early Punk evolution than NYC. NYC did play a big role in the evolution of Punk, but it certainly wasn't "born" there. That is a huge over-simplification that is just flat out not accurate.

Unless you are from NYC and think everything, ever, attributes its existence to NYC.


Wow, this is a special day. After looking long and hard I finally found him, the world's biggest asshole.

Listen up, slapdick, you may learn a thing or two. Anyone with any knowledge of musical history, especially those who were making the history, will tell you that Punk was born in NYC. Sure there were outliers that popped up here and there, and Punks influences come from all over. But Detroit? Please. The band Death actually played something pretty closely approximating hardcore punk music but no one really heard them until much later. MC5 had some of the attitude but weren't there musically. Iggy and the Stooges got close but were basically ignored.

There was a rebellious spirit in mus ...


I am sorry my pointing out your statements are complete bullshiat hurt your feelings, poor thing. It will be OK, it's only the internet.
 
2012-01-19 11:11:58 AM

Rapmaster2000: CapnBlues: zunkus: HotWingConspiracy: I don't get it, why would a hipster say this? Are just shoehorning in the word hipster every time NYC is mentioned?

This is FARK, a hipster here is anyone who has slightly differing tastes then you.

i've said it before and i'll say it again. On fark, the hipster hate comes down to:

[i195.photobucket.com image 456x352]

Young people, possibly financially comfortable enough to not need full-time wage-slave jobs, having a lot of fun with their lives, resented by wage slaves who bred too young or got into too much debt and now need to work their asses off and protect their credit ratings and honda civics.

I think "you're a hipster" is sometimes (especially in regards to art, music, food) the new "you think you're better than me" which of course has always been "I think you're better than me."

The accuser is displaying his self-esteem issues regarding his taste. He's saying, "I'm insecure about my interests." This is frequently coupled with "oh so it's cool to hate popular things" which belies the realization that the accuser understands he may only be liking things because they are popular.

The point is, don't call anyone a hipster. It says more about you than them.


I was described in that way once. Now I gleefully and derisively fling the term at others. The real difference? A generation gap, which leads to some variations in taste, of course. But being at least 20 years older than they are, I've also had some of the stupid beaten out of me, and frequently have a lot more information to play with, as well.
 
2012-01-19 11:27:00 AM

SDRR: downtownkid: SDRR: downtownkid: SDRR: forgotmydamnusername: SDRR: downtownkid: ....Yes, gentrification is inevitable. But this is a thriving urban neighborhood that has such a rich history that is being homogenized. The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born, this place is becoming a repurposed upscale shopping mall.

That is certainly worthy of comment.


NYC was a shiat hole, it's better now, nice place to visit once a decade. You're a farking douchebag, punk rock was in no way, shape, or form born in the United States, let alone NYC.

Go pretend you know what you are talking about in another thread.

Where was it invented then? Just curious...

Well, first it was not "invented" anywhere, more like evolved, mostly in the form of bands full of limeys from the UK from the music scene / atmosphere there in the late 60's/early 70's. Detroit played just as big, if not bigger part in early Punk evolution than NYC. NYC did play a big role in the evolution of Punk, but it certainly wasn't "born" there. That is a huge over-simplification that is just flat out not accurate.

Unless you are from NYC and think everything, ever, attributes its existence to NYC.


Wow, this is a special day. After looking long and hard I finally found him, the world's biggest asshole.

Listen up, slapdick, you may learn a thing or two. Anyone with any knowledge of musical history, especially those who were making the history, will tell you that Punk was born in NYC. Sure there were outliers that popped up here and there, and Punks influences come from all over. But Detroit? Please. The band Death actually played something pretty closely approximating hardcore punk music but no one really heard them until much later. MC5 had some of the attitude but weren't there musically. Iggy and the Stooges got close but were basically ignored.

There was a rebellious ...

I am sorry my pointing out your statements are complete bullshiat hurt your feelings, poor thing. It will be OK, it's only the internet.


Look, ordinarily I hate people whose horizon appears to begin and end at NYC just as much as the next guy, but he's kind of right. New York was by far the biggest and most influential early scene. Just as with the British Invasion 60's rock and pop thing, the punk the Brits sold back to us a year or two later was a slightly funhouse-mirrored version of what we'd previously exported to them.
 
2012-01-19 12:23:13 PM

Captain_Ballbeard: JeffTL: Cabrini-Green, which was atrocious not all that long ago, is gone and signs point to gentrification.

I was almost murdered in Cabrini-Green, when Van Halen's 1984 came out.


I hated that albulm too.
 
2012-01-19 01:01:32 PM

Crazymuthafarker: GarbageDay: At the risk of sounding like a hipster, I'd love to visit the 70s and 80s NYC. Grindhouses on 42nd, video arcades... Town had soul

/At least from pics that I've seen and descriptions I've read
//Not a hipster
///Love old school video games, exploitation flicks, and hair metal

Don't forget all of the porn theaters in Times Square.

/The streets ran white...


Or the violent crime! I sure miss me some violent crime.
 
2012-01-19 02:50:37 PM
wow, great site, thanks for the link!

Pimpin76: If you like these photos I also reccomend some of Camilo Jose Vergara's photos of New York City. He is slowly adding them to his website here. (new window)

Looks like he has a bunch of Harlem up with lots from the 80's. He has taken several sequences of photos over the years to show how the area has changed. For instance he will photograph one building ever two or three years for over a decade. It is interesting to see the life cycle over time. He also wrote a book entitled The New American Ghetto which I recommend as well.

 
2012-01-19 03:00:36 PM
Those days in New York were incredible. The relentless squeegee guys... the arcades... kung fu movies in Times Square with everyone yelling at the screen... buying dime bags in Union Square... stolen car radios on Canal Street... (Crazy Eddie...) cheap machettes on 14th... the Iranian hostages' ticker tape parade... selling red boxed phone calls at Grand Central... haggling at 47th Street Photo... yelling, "drive a Porche, Potvin" from the blue seats... peep show booths with no glass and a small handwritten sign that said, "no pussy touching"... man, those were the days.

Then there were the kids with knives chanting "Howard Beach"... the rapists in Central Park... the gangs who wore guns in their belts because the cops wouldn't go near them... stepping over the dead bodies in the subways... telling the cops about them only to have them laugh because they were the ones who did it...

Nope, don't want to go back.
 
2012-01-19 03:49:57 PM
I liked it better then...
 
2012-01-19 05:10:58 PM
I'm getting old so here...

www.moviegoods.com
 
2012-01-19 05:13:06 PM
www.eatlocalmemphis.org
Hipster Bill the Butcher lived in NYC before it was cool to live in NYC.
 
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