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(Gothamist)   Contrary to what the hipsters will tell you, the NYC of the 1980s was a farking shiathole (and here's pictorial proof)   (gothamist.com) divider line 259
    More: Obvious, NYC, Gothamist, Brooklyn Bridge, human feces, 12th Street, live better, public space, Philip Glass  
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25696 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jan 2012 at 12:31 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-19 01:37:41 AM  

jingks: brianbankerus: "State" also means "condition", potential dumbass

You sounds fun at parties.


Hey, easy there. I'm defending someone being called a dumbass because of a misunderstanding on the part of the misunderstander.

I'm god peoples's's's.
 
2012-01-19 01:38:35 AM  
Jesus... god = good.... I'm good people.

/this whole, it becomes too deep to dig out from.
 
2012-01-19 01:43:03 AM  
So let me get this straight, the standard of living in NYC has skyrocketed due to gentrification (with the rent price being the only downside) and.. you're all biatching about it?

"Aaaah I remember when NYC was a shiathole of drugs, prostitution, crime, homicides, trash... those where the days!" and now its terrible to live in NYC because *gasp* the streets are too clean! there are no more porn theaters! too many hipsters! so many culture is being produced! Times Square is a tourist trap and I hate it even though I never go there! whaa whaaa

Hatersaregonnahate.jpg
 
2012-01-19 01:48:16 AM  

maq0r: So let me get this straight, the standard of living in NYC has skyrocketed due to gentrification (with the rent price being the only downside) and.. you're all biatching about it?

"Aaaah I remember when NYC was a shiathole of drugs, prostitution, crime, homicides, trash... those where the days!" and now its terrible to live in NYC because *gasp* the streets are too clean! there are no more porn theaters! too many hipsters! so many culture is being produced! Times Square is a tourist trap and I hate it even though I never go there! whaa whaaa

Hatersaregonnahate.jpg



I've never had problems with lower class folk, but these assholes with the glasses make me wanna kill.
 
2012-01-19 01:48:50 AM  

lilplatinum: Jonathan Hohensee: I think that's what at the core of what is wrong with America in the 21st Century - unfettered capitalism and a lack of a social safety net has created a landscape in which a homogenized, one-size-fits all ideology eats up individualism. And, among other things, all of these stores are becoming the working base for kids just getting in the work force, and so instead of working for a mom-and-pop shop in which their bosses are some sort of people with agency and personality, they're working for an automated system in which they train based on the expectations of the lowest common denominator. And that's how these kids learn work skills first time out...it's not a sustainable system on any rung.

Translation "waaah, I can't afford to live where I want to and still just play in my band and wait tables".

/gentrification rules


I am gainfully employed with a job I like/pays well and have time to peruse my career.
 
2012-01-19 01:53:37 AM  

maq0r: So let me get this straight, the standard of living in NYC has skyrocketed due to gentrification (with the rent price being the only downside) and.. you're all biatching about it?

"Aaaah I remember when NYC was a shiathole of drugs, prostitution, crime, homicides, trash... those where the days!" and now its terrible to live in NYC because *gasp* the streets are too clean! there are no more porn theaters! too many hipsters! so many culture is being produced! Times Square is a tourist trap and I hate it even though I never go there! whaa whaaa

Hatersaregonnahate.jpg



Pretty simplistic take you have on it there.

The reality is that it used to be much more edgy and frontier. For example, there were very few decent first run cinemas. I mean, they were around but you had to travel to them. There were, however, all the Times Square grind houses. Formerly grand movie palaces fallen into extreme disrepair. Double features were five bucks and consisted of a first run action film like "They Live" and some awful B movie like "Death Row Game Show". You could smoke joints and bring your own beer to the theatre, but the floor was wet and sticky and there was a funky odor to the places. There were repertory theaters showing indie films all over town. So it was more primitive and dangerous but also much more interesting.
 
2012-01-19 01:53:52 AM  

Jonathan Hohensee: lilplatinum: Jonathan Hohensee: I think that's what at the core of what is wrong with America in the 21st Century - unfettered capitalism and a lack of a social safety net has created a landscape in which a homogenized, one-size-fits all ideology eats up individualism. And, among other things, all of these stores are becoming the working base for kids just getting in the work force, and so instead of working for a mom-and-pop shop in which their bosses are some sort of people with agency and personality, they're working for an automated system in which they train based on the expectations of the lowest common denominator. And that's how these kids learn work skills first time out...it's not a sustainable system on any rung.

Translation "waaah, I can't afford to live where I want to and still just play in my band and wait tables".

/gentrification rules

I am gainfully employed with a job I like/pays well and have time to peruse my career.


Then your overglamorization of mom and pop stores and mischaracterization of nyc just means you are ignorant in a different way than being a silly little artist.
 
2012-01-19 01:54:59 AM  
There is some really farking awesome photography in his flickr photostream.
 
2012-01-19 01:55:12 AM  

Jonathan Hohensee: I am gainfully employed with a job I like/pays well and have time to peruse my career.


What perusing your career may look like:

img.ehowcdn.com
 
2012-01-19 01:56:41 AM  

lilplatinum: Then your overglamorization of mom and pop stores and mischaracterization of nyc just means you are ignorant in a different way than being a silly little artist.


Compared to a silly, sad little troll? STFU
 
2012-01-19 01:56:44 AM  
I guess I was a post-punk hipster living in Manhattan in the eighties. The "irony" of our clothing style was to dress like an old man rather than today's hipsters who dress more like little boys.
We would seek out cardigans from the fifties/early sixties often simply with a white t-shirt. And trousers with very long flies that were meant to be worn up over your belly button on your proper waist. We wore these slacks down on the hip so usually we'd have them hemmed up quite a bit to have no "break". Big clunky soled shoes, I'm talking soles like running boards such as wing tips often have. Plimsoles (like keds) for women and plain canvas Sperries for men when sneakers were preferred. I've noticed many of todays hipsters wear Sperries too, but they now go with the classic brown topsider style. For a jacket, a mid-length trench or car coat with raglan sleeves and no lapel was best. In tweed or poplin as weather dictated.
Everything was a muddy subdued plaid or pattern, no brights, although occasionally sharkskin.
Our theory was that the old men knew better how to dress because they've been doing it longer.
Haircuts were the hitler youth style which today's hipsters are wearing again. Shorn on the sides and back with a shock of longer hair parted up top. "Trendy" eighties hairstyles (shaved, carved, etc.) were shunned. No crazy hair coloring either, you were over that phase. You had to be careful not to look like the midwestern 'alternative' yokel from Chicago, you know, the weird "punk" kid from eighties movies.
Not many said the term "hipster" but it was tossed around a bit. You were more likely to hear "hep-cat". I imagine even today the kids don't consider themselves "hipsters". Mostly you don't label/define your own style, you only categorize others.
/and ny was kinda a shiathole, especially for us poor kids, but Max Fish was a nice spot for the evening.
//I burned the top of my mouth because I ate pizza before it was cool. In other words I expect to get ribbed a bit for my candor on this subject or at least a tl;dr.
 
2012-01-19 01:57:15 AM  
Everything I know about New York has been formed by childhood-first-run viewings of 'Barney Miller' episodes.

Apparently, the place was a toilet, over run by character actors bent on a life of crime.

Then the 'Seinfeld' administration came in and cleaned house.
 
2012-01-19 01:57:16 AM  

Jonathan Hohensee: God, I had this awful encounter with a hipster last week. I was camping in the woods, and I accidentally left the cooler out all night. About 3:00 I wake up to hear some rustling outside of my tent, and there I saw it; a gigantic, furry 800 pound hipster was biting at the cooler like it was a candy bar or something. I panicked, but then I remembered what my old boy scout troop leader used to tell me to do whenever I saw a hipster; just play dead. And so I did that, and the damn hipster came up to me, sniffed me for a second, and then left the camp grounds. It was honestly the scariest thing to happen to me in my entire life.


He wanted your PBR!
daddydetails.com
 
2012-01-19 01:57:36 AM  
A couple of interesting quotes from one of the people posting on the Gothamist site, I think they really hit it on the head:

TuraLura: You could do practically whatever you wanted, as long as you did it in a "bad" neighborhood. It was not a living hell. At. All.

Sit on the stoop with your friends and smoke out? No problem. Go to a $2 double feature or a $1 movie? No problem. Have an impromptu barbeque in a vacant lot? No problem. Start a pirate radio station, a poetry magazine, open a music club, art gallery, theater company, performance art troupe? Yes, yes, yes and yes. See Steve Buscemi perform at King Tut's Wah-Wah Hut for free? But of course. Hang out with Basquiat, Keith Haring, Philip Glass, Lady Bunny, Ethyl Eichelberger, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Allen Ginsburg or the Ramones (just to name a few off the top of my head)? Any night of the week.

Back then, people were basically just looking for a place to be weird, to work out their weirdness and transform it into something beautiful, meaningful and entertaining, along with other people whose weirdness complemented their own. All they needed was space, time and each other, for the most part- and NYC had it all. Some came from middle class backgrounds, some came from rich families (that disowned them, for the most part), some came from urban or rural poverty, some were transplants, and some just had to get on the subway. But they all aspired to something that they couldn't get anywhere else.

The difference now is that there is very little time, very expensive space, and it seems to me that most of the people who come here are pursuing different dreams: Fame, fortune and enjoying the suburban comforts one is accustomed to, while also being able to say you live in the city, are the order of the day.

So the weird don't bother/can't afford moving here anymore. And the city is much the poorer for it, and in a much more crucial way, than it was during the bankruptcy of the 70s.

The toughness of the streets was a great filter for people who lacked the mettle to live here. And the low cost of living meant that artists could work on their art, people could pursue all kinds of personal dreams without worrying about whether they'd be financially rewarding, and you couldn't walk down a street downtown without running into a friend, a party or a happening of some kind, whether a loft party or an oil drum barbeque.
 
2012-01-19 02:00:51 AM  

Znuh: A couple of interesting quotes from one of the people posting on the Gothamist site, I think they really hit it on the head:

TuraLura: You could do practically whatever you wanted, as long as you did it in a "bad" neighborhood. It was not a living hell. At. All.

Sit on the stoop with your friends and smoke out? No problem. Go to a $2 double feature or a $1 movie? No problem. Have an impromptu barbeque in a vacant lot? No problem. Start a pirate radio station, a poetry magazine, open a music club, art gallery, theater company, performance art troupe? Yes, yes, yes and yes. See Steve Buscemi perform at King Tut's Wah-Wah Hut for free? But of course. Hang out with Basquiat, Keith Haring, Philip Glass, Lady Bunny, Ethyl Eichelberger, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Allen Ginsburg or the Ramones (just to name a few off the top of my head)? Any night of the week.

Back then, people were basically just looking for a place to be weird, to work out their weirdness and transform it into something beautiful, meaningful and entertaining, along with other people whose weirdness complemented their own. All they needed was space, time and each other, for the most part- and NYC had it all. Some came from middle class backgrounds, some came from rich families (that disowned them, for the most part), some came from urban or rural poverty, some were transplants, and some just had to get on the subway. But they all aspired to something that they couldn't get anywhere else.

The difference now is that there is very little time, very expensive space, and it seems to me that most of the people who come here are pursuing different dreams: Fame, fortune and enjoying the suburban comforts one is accustomed to, while also being able to say you live in the city, are the order of the day.

So the weird don't bother/can't afford moving here anymore. And the city is much the poorer for it, and in a much more crucial way, than it was during the bankruptcy of the 70s.

The toughness of the streets w ...



Welllll, it's a little "rose colored glasses" but largely accurate. There was plenty of pretty real danger too.
 
2012-01-19 02:01:07 AM  

Captain_Ballbeard: lilplatinum: Then your overglamorization of mom and pop stores and mischaracterization of nyc just means you are ignorant in a different way than being a silly little artist.

Compared to a silly, sad little troll? STFU


Trolling? What? True there is snark but the point remains that every time gentrification comes up idiots always bring it to some extremes like it is the sign of destruction instead of a normal function of city development since time immemorial. Combined with his idiocy about "mom and pop stores", when all the gentrified hipster areas of NYC/Brooklyn eschew such things because they are terminally unhip and we just get a complete brew of idiocy.
 
2012-01-19 02:03:38 AM  

Oznog: The_Sponge: [i22.photobucket.com image 319x148]

Dead body with its feet pointing skyward?

[gothamist.com image 640x297]

It's the invention of "Planking" right there. It took another 25 years or so to catch on and destroy humanity.


A million hipsters are now jealous
 
2012-01-19 02:03:52 AM  

Znuh: A couple of interesting quotes from one of the people posting on the Gothamist site, I think they really hit it on the head:

TuraLura: You could do practically whatever you wanted, as long as you did it in a "bad" neighborhood. It was not a living hell. At. All.

Sit on the stoop with your friends and smoke out? No problem. Go to a $2 double feature or a $1 movie? No problem. Have an impromptu barbeque in a vacant lot? No problem. Start a pirate radio station, a poetry magazine, open a music club, art gallery, theater company, performance art troupe? Yes, yes, yes and yes. See Steve Buscemi perform at King Tut's Wah-Wah Hut for free? But of course. Hang out with Basquiat, Keith Haring, Philip Glass, Lady Bunny, Ethyl Eichelberger, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Allen Ginsburg or the Ramones (just to name a few off the top of my head)? Any night of the week.

Back then, people were basically just looking for a place to be weird, to work out their weirdness and transform it into something beautiful, meaningful and entertaining, along with other people whose weirdness complemented their own. All they needed was space, time and each other, for the most part- and NYC had it all. Some came from middle class backgrounds, some came from rich families (that disowned them, for the most part), some came from urban or rural poverty, some were transplants, and some just had to get on the subway. But they all aspired to something that they couldn't get anywhere else.

The difference now is that there is very little time, very expensive space, and it seems to me that most of the people who come here are pursuing different dreams: Fame, fortune and enjoying the suburban comforts one is accustomed to, while also being able to say you live in the city, are the order of the day.

So the weird don't bother/can't afford moving here anymore. And the city is much the poorer for it, and in a much more crucial way, than it was during the bankruptcy of the 70s.

The toughness of the streets w ...



Welcome to Big Box America.
 
2012-01-19 02:04:20 AM  

Znuh: The toughness of the streets was a great filter for people who lacked the mettle to live here. And the low cost of living meant that artists could work on their art, people could pursue all kinds of personal dreams without worrying about whether they'd be financially rewarding, and you couldn't walk down a street downtown without running into a friend, a party or a happening of some kind, whether a loft party or an oil drum barbeque.


Yes, the personal lives of some artists were inconvenienced, what a shame the city didn't retain it's record levels of crime and filth from the 80s. Or they could move to whatever new squat is farking cheap and realize that life changes.
 
2012-01-19 02:04:22 AM  
If you like these photos I also reccomend some of Camilo Jose Vergara's photos of New York City. He is slowly adding them to his website here. (new window)

Looks like he has a bunch of Harlem up with lots from the 80's. He has taken several sequences of photos over the years to show how the area has changed. For instance he will photograph one building ever two or three years for over a decade. It is interesting to see the life cycle over time. He also wrote a book entitled The New American Ghetto which I recommend as well.
 
2012-01-19 02:07:16 AM  
www.icine.com.au
Everybody's talkIng

1969 NYC is the place to be. Gay cowboy and you catch TB!

Hey, I'm walkin' here!
 
2012-01-19 02:07:33 AM  

studebaker hoch: humanshrapnel

That is all.

I'll know who to ask for, the number to call, their name and location for the rest of my effin life.

/Best ad campaign evar.


...teeeeeeeehn foohrrrrtee tree dat's paul's bootiq out der n brooklyyyyyn
 
2012-01-19 02:08:07 AM  

lilplatinum: Or they could move to whatever new squat is farking cheap and realize that life changes.


St. Louis: America's artistic capital.
 
2012-01-19 02:08:22 AM  
I lived and worked there then. What a pit! Too many bloated unions, politicians, rent controls, corrupt cops. Say what you will about Rudy, but he rallied the town and made some "revisions" that had to be done.

If you miss the 1980's NY today, visit Philly.
 
2012-01-19 02:11:50 AM  

lilplatinum: Captain_Ballbeard: lilplatinum: Then your overglamorization of mom and pop stores and mischaracterization of nyc just means you are ignorant in a different way than being a silly little artist.

Compared to a silly, sad little troll? STFU

Trolling? What? True there is snark but the point remains that every time gentrification comes up idiots always bring it to some extremes like it is the sign of destruction instead of a normal function of city development since time immemorial. Combined with his idiocy about "mom and pop stores", when all the gentrified hipster areas of NYC/Brooklyn eschew such things because they are terminally unhip and we just get a complete brew of idiocy.



a normal function of city development since time immemorial.

The East Village is transforming from a neighborhood consisting almost entirely of mom and pop stores into one dominated by businesses run by national corporations for the first time in it's history. Is that a hard concept for you to grasp?

Yes, gentrification is inevitable. But this is a thriving urban neighborhood that has such a rich history that is being homogenized. The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born, this place is becoming a repurposed upscale shopping mall.

That is certainly worthy of comment.
 
2012-01-19 02:13:08 AM  

Znuh: A couple of interesting quotes from one of the people posting on the Gothamist site, I think they really hit it on the head:

TuraLura: You could do practically whatever you wanted, as long as you did it in a "bad" neighborhood. It was not a living hell. At. All.

Sit on the stoop with your friends and smoke out? No problem. Go to a $2 double feature or a $1 movie? No problem. Have an impromptu barbeque in a vacant lot? No problem. Start a pirate radio station, a poetry magazine, open a music club, art gallery, theater company, performance art troupe? Yes, yes, yes and yes. See Steve Buscemi perform at King Tut's Wah-Wah Hut for free? But of course. Hang out with Basquiat, Keith Haring, Philip Glass, Lady Bunny, Ethyl Eichelberger, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Allen Ginsburg or the Ramones (just to name a few off the top of my head)? Any night of the week.

Back then, people were basically just looking for a place to be weird, to work out their weirdness and transform it into something beautiful, meaningful and entertaining, along with other people whose weirdness complemented their own. All they needed was space, time and each other, for the most part- and NYC had it all. Some came from middle class backgrounds, some came from rich families (that disowned them, for the most part), some came from urban or rural poverty, some were transplants, and some just had to get on the subway. But they all aspired to something that they couldn't get anywhere else.

The difference now is that there is very little time, very expensive space, and it seems to me that most of the people who come here are pursuing different dreams: Fame, fortune and enjoying the suburban comforts one is accustomed to, while also being able to say you live in the city, are the order of the day.

So the weird don't bother/can't afford moving here anymore. And the city is much the poorer for it, and in a much more crucial way, than it was during the bankruptcy of the 70s.

The toughness of the streets w ...



Same happens everywhere. People with money move in, they don't want you 'smoking up' on the steps, or making a lot of noise in a vacant lot (besides which, they know they guy who's just bought that lot and he's planning to start building there next week.

Things changed. They stopped you doing what you wanted, in order to have the peace and quiet they want. Sucks they own the place and it's you that has to get out, but it turns out (and here's the clincher) that not everyone, and especially not everyone over 25, gives a rats ass about that stuff.
 
2012-01-19 02:18:02 AM  

downtownkid: The East Village is transforming from a neighborhood consisting almost entirely of mom and pop stores into one dominated by businesses run by national corporations for the first time in it's history.


It's the whole country and they are not "national" corps, they are global corporations, who suck all of the money out of local, state and national economies while paying no tax and giving no fark about the colonists they are bleeding dry. Tories.
 
2012-01-19 02:19:37 AM  

downtownkid: The East Village is transforming from a neighborhood consisting almost entirely of mom and pop stores into one dominated by businesses run by national corporations for the first time in it's history. Is that a hard concept for you to grasp?


Life is going this way, try not to point it out as some NYC victimhood. East village still has a farkload more local businesses than any of the suburbs and most of the cities that the locals whine about them becoming. I'm fairly sure neither of the bars I was at there tonight before I went to the farking Williamsburg oyster bar ($1 for all 20 types, hell of a happy hour) are a lot more "unique" then most farking places in this country.

Most of this whining comes from locals who are just upset that things are changing and change is just bad.. Its like some bizzare backwards urban version of my racist grandpa who gets mad that those colored folk moved into a once nice neighborhood.

Yes, gentrification is inevitable. But this is a thriving urban neighborhood that has such a rich history that is being homogenized. The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born, this place is becoming a repurposed upscale shopping mall.

Only someone raised here can think that east village is either homogenized or an upscale shopping mall, but I suppose this flair for the dramatic is something acquired from people who didn't actually grow up in such homogenized shopping mall neighborhoods.
 
2012-01-19 02:21:21 AM  

downtownkid: The neighborhood of the bolsheviks, the labor movement, the beats, the hippies, the yippies, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman and John Zorn, the place where punk rock was born


All of those occured in my own mothers life-time (save for the Russian Revolution) and one of them in my own.

The city was something else entirely long before any of the above cited achievements.

It'll out-live us all.
 
2012-01-19 02:26:22 AM  
I am 27 and born and raised on the upper west side of manhattan. Even I have witnessedthe disney that has become new york. I am a real estate agent so i get to travel all around the city. even the 'hood' is gentrified. I told my father that I was showing apartments in bushwick and bed stuy that retail for 2000/month. He was shocked. He told me that he wouldnt be caught dead there in the 70's or 80's. I also have friends that are in there.. 40's and were tagging train and b-boying in the 80's. most of them and their friends either moved away or cant stand the current "culture" of NYC. They have destroyed the upper west side. It used to be mixed race and mixed income and now it is all rich uppity snobs. My friend who is 40 calls them culture bandits. The only true New Yorkers are the ones who either were born here or have been here more than 20 years. I miss the old new york or at least what i got to see of it which was the tail end of it.
 
2012-01-19 02:27:43 AM  
This is the kind of chaos you get, when you let Democrats run things, plus 2,000 murders a year.


Thank God a Republican came along and cleaned it up. -Just like Romney will have to do when we get the Affirmative Action President / golfer out of office.
 
2012-01-19 02:28:58 AM  

crazydave023: I am 27 and born and raised on the upper west side of manhattan. Even I have witnessedthe disney that has become new york. I am a real estate agent so i get to travel all around the city. even the 'hood' is gentrified. I told my father that I was showing apartments in bushwick and bed stuy that retail for 2000/month.


If you think bushwick or bed stuy are "disney" than you really need to get the fark out of new york and travel a bit.
 
2012-01-19 02:28:58 AM  

FlashHarry: i first visited manhattan in 1989. over the next two decades or so, i visited a couple of dozen more times. each visit, it was less scuzzy and more upscale. to the point where, in my last visit three years ago, it was unrecognizable. it's kind of sad, actually.


I first visited in the early 90's and have a similar recollection of how it became less a city of bleeding knees and poetic desperation and more a GAP advertisement. Like you, I felt kind of sad about it. Granted, I never had to live there for any long period of time (spent a few months there with a girl at Parson's School of Design, which was/is apparently a big deal).

My own town is facing similar sterilization. No one ever said that New Orleans is perfect, but when you came here you felt a small buzz of electricity running through you - a sense of danger and curiosity - before they corporatized all the Bourbon St. bars and made getting a hooker slightly more difficult than it was in 1995. Man, you can't even hear jazz here anymore because every place is designed to be Disney with tits and vomit. So, like in NYC, you go to the adjacent neighborhoods where the rents haven't completely dry-farked the artists. And, well, yeah, those neighborhoods are full of hipsters - fixed gears, body odor and all. It's a different class of bag whore skank and a more long-winded poet, but it still lives on.

I imagine it's the same deal in NYC.
 
2012-01-19 02:31:56 AM  

dickfreckle: My own town is facing similar sterilization. No one ever said that New Orleans is perfect, but when you came here you felt a small buzz of electricity running through you - a sense of danger and curiosity


Yes, now when you hang out in NOLA all you feel is safety...
 
2012-01-19 02:33:23 AM  

dericwater: Is that Lieutenant Dan?

[gothamist.com image 640x538]


i recon it's Steve...

content7.flixster.com
 
2012-01-19 02:41:19 AM  

OOBE Juan Kenobi: [img208.imageshack.us image 485x364]

"Oh, I know what you're thinking. My camera's bigger than yours, right? It's not fair."


First thing I caught.
 
2012-01-19 02:47:46 AM  

lilplatinum: dickfreckle: My own town is facing similar sterilization. No one ever said that New Orleans is perfect, but when you came here you felt a small buzz of electricity running through you - a sense of danger and curiosity

Yes, now when you hang out in NOLA all you feel is safety...


In the FQ? Yes.

The murders are overwhelmingly thugs killing each other in their own neighborhoods. SOmetimes they still occur in high-profile areas, but even then they're not targeting tourists. You have just as much a chance of being murdered in downtown New Orleans (where a tourist is likely to stay) as you would in even the current Times Square. Isolated examples do not a trend make.

Next month when someone is shot in or near Times Square, it'll make the same headlines as the inevitably upcoming Mardis Gras murder because one player looked at the other the wrong way. It doesn't mean the place hasn't been thoroughly sanitized as compared to years ago.

But Soccer mom showing their tits? She'll be fine. So will her snowflakes.
 
2012-01-19 02:52:53 AM  

lilplatinum: If you think bushwick or bed stuy are "disney" than you really need to get the fark out of new york and travel a bit.


This gave me a good chuckle.
 
2012-01-19 02:53:19 AM  

skinink: Everything I know about New York in the 80's I learned from "The Warriors" and "Fort Apache The Bronx", Paul Newman version.


www.lobshots.com

I learned that they don't always mug you with the biggest knives made, and will stand there while you fetch your own, much larger knife in broad daylight and then flee in terror.

Do they still have muggers that dress in the latest high-dollar styles? It doesn't have to be 80's style, of course. I just like to be mugged by well-dressed men.

iranpoliticsclub.net

Wait, I know I've seen that exact jacket somewhere... ahhh...
 
2012-01-19 02:54:16 AM  
See that picture of the elevated West Side Highway?

Well a little north of that is Gansvoort st. That's where Hemingway Trucking used to park their red Mack tractors overnight and where there was a a good hydrant for filling up the water tanks on our tug.

http://tugboatinformation.com/pictures/thumbs/thumbJustine%20McAllist e r%20(1)_472x6001.jpg

We used to take water between barges at the Sanitation Marine Transfer station. I got to stand there and shut the hydrant when our tank was full and watch the hookers sliding in and out of the cabs of the parked tractors doing their business with the Jersey bound drivers headed for the Lincoln tunnel.

(Must have been a real pleasure to be one of the drivers and open that cab in the morning)

Good times, the Fresh Kills barge run 6 days on 8 days off and all the mungo you could handle.
 
2012-01-19 03:03:11 AM  

dickfreckle: The murders are overwhelmingly thugs killing each other in their own neighborhoods. SOmetimes they still occur in high-profile areas, but even then they're not targeting tourists. You have just as much a chance of being murdered in downtown New Orleans (where a tourist is likely to stay) as you would in even the current Times Square. Isolated examples do not a trend make.


Its a lot easier to walk into a murder prone area of NOLA than NYC... I recently moved to brooklyn and am not particularly in fear of any areas, I get worried when I visit my boys in NOLA.. My cousin who Dumaine right near eats (awesome joint to eat at, good food - byob) has had a murder and several assaults happen on his block in the past few months... I love NOLA and don't let that scare me away, but its a lot more farking dangerous than NYC which is, statistically, pretty farking safe.. (I wont even talk about my days at grad school at the University of Houston in the middle of the farking ghetto - made even worse after we got all the NOLA refugees)
 
2012-01-19 03:06:13 AM  
 
2012-01-19 03:12:37 AM  

crazydave023: I am 27 and born and raised on the upper west side of manhattan. Even I have witnessedthe disney that has become new york. I am a real estate agent so i get to travel all around the city. even the 'hood' is gentrified. I told my father that I was showing apartments in bushwick and bed stuy that retail for 2000/month. He was shocked. He told me that he wouldnt be caught dead there in the 70's or 80's. I also have friends that are in there.. 40's and were tagging train and b-boying in the 80's. most of them and their friends either moved away or cant stand the current "culture" of NYC. They have destroyed the upper west side. It used to be mixed race and mixed income and now it is all rich uppity snobs. My friend who is 40 calls them culture bandits. The only true New Yorkers are the ones who either were born here or have been here more than 20 years. I miss the old new york or at least what i got to see of it which was the tail end of it.


www.centralparkjogger.com

Some change is for the best.
 
2012-01-19 03:15:00 AM  
All you need to be is old enough to remember 1980 to know New York was a notorious sh*thole. It wasn't cleaned up at all until Mid 80s.
 
2012-01-19 03:16:50 AM  

saintwrathchild: humanshrapnel: [3.bp.blogspot.com image 640x640]

That is all.

718-498-1043, that's 718-498-ten-fooohty-three, out there in Brooklyn.


The best in men's clothing! ...ask for Janice!
 
2012-01-19 03:25:54 AM  
I watched Ric Burns's documentary about New York over Xmas* and felt so homesick, I cried. NYC was a shiathole for almost every decade of its existence, but it was a complete city with room for people of every class, and the cultural capital of the world. (According to me, and like most "New Yorkers" I moved there in my 20s.)

Its just not that way anymore. It's sanitized, safe, smoke-free, and beyond the reach of almost anyone who isn't a celebrity or a Wall Streeter. Let them have it.

Times have changed. The internet has changed things just as much as the concentration of wealth. You don't hang around clubs in the Village to hear new poets or new music anymore. If you want to talk to writers, you're as likely to do it online as at a local pub.

I miss Broadway. It's probably the thing I miss most. When I lived there, I could still afford to go see a show on Broadway, and I'm so glad I got the chance to do that. I saw Gregory Hines and Savion Glover tap dance together and heard Ella Fitzgerald sing at RCMH. I caught BB King at the Apollo. I'm sure there are still great Broadway shows out there, but not ones I could afford.

Of course, the thing I miss most about NYC is my crappy 1BR apartment that I sold in 2000 for $500k. I thought I'd made out like a bandit. After I finished weeping over the Ken Burns film, I googled the address, and landed a listing for the same line. They're asking $1.7m.

/Only in New York, folks.
/*Awesome documentary by the way
 
2012-01-19 03:27:12 AM  
If you were in NY in the 80s, you complained about the crime, now, you complain about the lack of it.... Just goes to show, that you cant have your rape and eat it too...
 
2012-01-19 03:28:18 AM  

Begoggle: [i.qkme.me image 407x405]


Even old New York was once New Amsterdan.
Why they changed it, I can't say!
(People just liked it better that way)
 
2012-01-19 03:28:19 AM  
images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-01-19 03:29:00 AM  

leonel: [images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 200x146]


Which episode was that?
 
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