If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(IFC)   The 20 best job quitting scenes in movies. "Fark you, fark you, fark you, you're cool, and fark you. I'm out"   (ifc.com) divider line 112
    More: Cool, Jackie Earle Haley, Jack Lemmon, Doug Hutchison, IFC, Billy Wilder, Dennis Quaid, Rorschach, Chuck Palahniuk  
•       •       •

17860 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 17 Jan 2012 at 11:03 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



112 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
Pud [TotalFark]
2012-01-17 10:43:29 AM
t2.gstatic.com
 
2012-01-17 10:50:31 AM
Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?
 
2012-01-17 10:59:37 AM

PizzaJedi81: Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?


You have failed. Look for the "Continue to next page" at the bottom.
 
2012-01-17 11:03:39 AM

dj_bigbird: PizzaJedi81: Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?

You have failed. Look for the "Continue to next page" at the bottom.


Yeah? Where is it, then? What's next to it? What's above it? Don't you think I would have clicked on that, if I had seen it?
 
2012-01-17 11:07:43 AM

PizzaJedi81: Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?


It's called a Flash cover. I can see the page because I have Flashblock for Chrome. However, if I click on anything, I allow the dumbass Flash thingy to run.

Or in other words, cast IFC in with anyone who uses forced Flash ads. The farkers.
 
2012-01-17 11:09:38 AM

IlGreven: PizzaJedi81: Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?

It's called a Flash cover. I can see the page because I have Flashblock for Chrome. However, if I click on anything, I allow the dumbass Flash thingy to run.

Or in other words, cast IFC in with anyone who uses forced Flash ads. The farkers.


Fair enough...but where is the button? Where button, where?
 
2012-01-17 11:10:55 AM

PizzaJedi81: dj_bigbird: PizzaJedi81: Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?

You have failed. Look for the "Continue to next page" at the bottom.

Yeah? Where is it, then? What's next to it? What's above it? Don't you think I would have clicked on that, if I had seen it?


It is immediately below the video of # 5, and just above the "Pages: 1 2 3 4" where you can directly to any of the 4 pages.
 
2012-01-17 11:11:00 AM
List fails without... "Mr Ellison, you can take you job and shove it!"
 
2012-01-17 11:11:48 AM
The more I think about it, the more I realize that the movies made in the 1998 - 2002 year range were some of the best pieces of cinema before or after.
 
2012-01-17 11:14:29 AM
There were a lot of people complaining about jobs most of us today would kill for in 1999. American Beauty, Office Space (the programmers, not the waitress), Fight Club, Free Enterprise, The Matrix. Kids watching those movies today would have to ask WTF they were biatching about.
 
2012-01-17 11:17:18 AM
The "Reality Bites" one was the funniest, best part of that sucky, patronizing movie.
 
2012-01-17 11:17:27 AM
I'd like to nominate for honorable mention, Clint Eastwood in The Enforcer:
Link (new window)
Skip to about 6:28 for the relevant scene.
 
2012-01-17 11:18:05 AM
FYI I had to cut on compatibility view for IE9 to see it.
 
2012-01-17 11:18:15 AM

Pud:


I'm assuming the list is in no particular order, because that scene is undisputed #1
 
2012-01-17 11:19:25 AM
 
2012-01-17 11:19:32 AM
Arlo demands a recount:

www.xrayspx.com
 
2012-01-17 11:19:42 AM

good_2_go: PizzaJedi81: dj_bigbird: PizzaJedi81: Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?

You have failed. Look for the "Continue to next page" at the bottom.

Yeah? Where is it, then? What's next to it? What's above it? Don't you think I would have clicked on that, if I had seen it?

It is immediately below the video of # 5, and just above the "Pages: 1 2 3 4" where you can directly to any of the 4 pages.


This is what I see:

The video.

Tags.

Like and Tweet

Links.

It's just not there for me.
 
2012-01-17 11:22:34 AM

PizzaJedi81: good_2_go: PizzaJedi81: dj_bigbird: PizzaJedi81: Why am I only seeing 5 of them, and no back or forward buttons?

You have failed. Look for the "Continue to next page" at the bottom.

Yeah? Where is it, then? What's next to it? What's above it? Don't you think I would have clicked on that, if I had seen it?

It is immediately below the video of # 5, and just above the "Pages: 1 2 3 4" where you can directly to any of the 4 pages.

This is what I see:

The video.

Tags.

Like and Tweet

Links.

It's just not there for me
.


Just let it go, man.
 
2012-01-17 11:24:14 AM
That site crashed my Chrome. Twice.
 
2012-01-17 11:24:17 AM

Titor's Time Machine: Just let it go, man.


Normally, I would, but now I'm just pissed at it. Yes, I know it's not rational. Yes, I know it doesn't matter, even a little bit.

I want to know, god damn it!
 
2012-01-17 11:24:43 AM
Anyone gonna take one for the team and post the list, or is it just not worth it?
 
2012-01-17 11:25:25 AM

Jake Havechek: The "Reality Bites" one was the funniest, best part of that sucky, patronizing movie.


Mmm, Janeane Garofalo back when she was cute and not shrill and all tattoo-ed up.
 
2012-01-17 11:26:00 AM
Burn After Reading is about as perfect a vehicle for Malkovich as I've ever seen.
 
2012-01-17 11:28:07 AM
"But let me just say, as I ease out of the office, that i helped build... I'm sorry, but it is a FACT... that there is such a thing... as manners. A way of treating people. (a pause, he nods, looks around, sees the fish tank) These fish have manners. These fish have manners. In fact, they're coming with me. I'm starting a new company, and the fish are coming with me. You can (chuckle) call me sentimental, but the fish are coming with me."
 
2012-01-17 11:29:02 AM
Elwood: Boss, I need to tell you that I gotta quit.

Elwood's Boss: Why Elwood?

Elwood: I'm going to become a priest.
 
2012-01-17 11:30:29 AM
I had forgotten about that scene from Wanted. It was pretty good.
 
2012-01-17 11:32:38 AM
"Your fired" - Arnold Scwarzenegger
 
2012-01-17 11:34:10 AM
Good list. Impressed they remembered to include Breaking Away.

Half Baked still reigns supreme, but there are some good candidates on there vying for second.
 
2012-01-17 11:37:17 AM
Mitch: You... You are the biggest piece of shiat in this entire restaurant.

Mitch: And I hope you burn in hell.

Floyd: Me? What the fark did I do to you, man? Seriously?
 
2012-01-17 11:37:38 AM
As I'm twiddling thumbs while waiting on a phone call, here's the list:

1. "Fight Club" (1999)

This is, for many, the best scene in David Fincher's ode to masculinity in a hopelessly emasculated society, as the Narrator (Edward Norton) goes to physical extremes - on himself - in blackmailing his boss (Zach Grenier). "Fight Club" is usually at its best whenever Brad Pitt's id-driven Tyler Durden is around, but Norton really shines in this tour-de-force moment of self-mutilation - it's both funny and scary watching him punch himself in the face and crash through glass as the boss is too awestruck to realize just how screwed he is now. Jack's Smirking Revenge, indeed.

2. "American Beauty" (1999)

When Kevin Spacey takes on that smarmy, self-righteous tone he's so good at, there's no actor more intimidating - or scathingly funny. Spacey's Lester Burnham is a put-upon suburban father and husband who suddenly has an epiphany of almost supernatural proportions that leads to a series of radical life changes, one of which is quitting his job at an advertising agency in the most satisfying way possible. Thank goodness we have the movies to fuel our fantasies of telling off our bosses so we don't go around pulling this kind of crap ourselves.

3. "Reality Bites" (1994)

John Mahoney makes for one of the worst movie bosses of all time as the host of an intolerably cheesy talk show, with Winona Ryder playing his emotionally abused assistant. When it comes time for Winona to instigate her own firing, director Ben Stiller can't help but go a little too far with the wacky shenanigans (this is the guy behind the sketch comedy show, "The Ben Stiller Show," after all) as Mahoney makes a fool (or, rather, a prick) of himself on television thanks to some tampered-with notecards (that cutaway shot to the aghast audience is especially wretched), but how can you not help but cheer when Winona Ryder gets her revenge against a big jerk? Hopelessly dated now, "Reality Bites" now serves as a historical piece documenting the trials and tribulations of employment-phobic Generation X.

4. "The Apartment" (1960)

"You dig?" Fred MacMurray dares condescend to Jack Lemmon in Billy Wilder's mischievous comedy. Lemmon plays an executive who tries to rise in the ranks of his company (all the way up to the 27th Floor, in fact) by letting the higher-ups use his apartment for trysts; things get complicated when he embarks on a romance of his own and starts to realize that the whole arrangement is rather, well, gross. If you want to be cynical about it, Lemmon's C.C. Baxter could be seen as a younger version of Shelly 'The Machine' Levene, the washed-up salesman he played 32 years later in "Glengarry Glen Ross," though we'd like to think Baxter went on to a lucrative career and never needed to rob his own office.

5. "Breaking Away" (1979)

Watch as a young Rorschach from "Watchman" literally punches the clock! People seem to have forgotten that Jackie Earle Haley was quite the renowned child actor, stealing bases (and scenes) as Kelly Leak in "The Bad News Bears" and coming of age as Moocher in "Breaking Away." Mooch needs a job, but he doesn't need a job where the boss calls him "Shorty" - quitting within 30 seconds of your first day has to be some sort of record, and Dennis Christopher, Dennis Quaid (looking considerably older than his co-stars) and Daniel Stern heartily approve.

6. "Burn After Reading" (2008)

"This doesn't have to be unpleasant." This clip ends before we actually see Osbourne Cox (John Malkovich) quit his CIA analyst job in response to being demoted, but you can see where it's heading. Malkovich gives his most spirited performance in years in the Coen Brothers' dark comedy, obviously delighting in all of the anger and profanity he gets to throw around in almost every scene he's in. The Coens try to bring their usual control-freak, ultra-mannered style to this scene, but Malkovich gives it an unpredictable, anarchic edge - you half-expect him to pull out a grenade and just blow everyone sky-high.

7. "Half-Baked" (1998)

You know every single person that works or has worked in the fast food industry has fantasized about this scenario at one point or another - probably at least once a day, actually. Scarface (Guillermo Diaz) quits his flippin'-burgers gig in the underrated stoner comedy, "Half Baked," letting it be known that the customers are just as responsible for his oppression as his boss and co-workers (not all of them, though - there's one patron in particular that he relieves of any blame). Oh, what sweet, deep-fried catharsis.

8. "Lost in America" (1985)

No one can do upper-middle-class misery quite like Albert Brooks. He's perfect at playing put-upon characters who just don't know when to leave well enough alone, making uncomfortable scenes like this one almost completely unbearable as we watch him dig a deeper and deeper hole for himself. Brooks quitting his gig at an advertising agency (an industry often portrayed as a miserable place to work in movies, oddly enough) upon not receiving a long sought-after promotion prompts the entire journey (and point) of "Lost in America," proving once again that sometimes you have to lose the job to find yourself.

9. "Mr. Mom" (1983)

Jack (Michael Keaton) was technically laid off from his engineering job, but in this scene he's given a chance to get it back if he backs up a lie conjured up by his superior (Jeffrey Tambor); as he refuses, it qualifies as quitting from a potential re-hire. Keaton displays the kind of twitchy, dangerous energy in this scene that would lead to him being the ideal choice to play Bruce Wayne in Tim Burton's "Batman" movies; it's a treat to watch him indignantly pace around the room, hands on his hips, pointing accusingly at the suits behind the desk and at his old boss. Why doesn't this man work much anymore? Wasn't there a part for him in Burton's "Dark Shadows"?

10. "Network" (1976)

"I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take this anymore!" So goes the battle cry of Howard Beale (Peter Finch), the mad prophet of the airwaves, a news anchor fired from his network due to declining ratings; he's given a second career of sorts when the network starts to exploit his increasingly deranged rants and revelations about media and the state of the world in general. This classic scene isn't so much a "quitting scene" in a traditional sense, but it's a prime example of how one's job can completely skew their world view - and their sanity (though, indeed, is he really "insane?"). If you gotta go, go out swinging - and swinging hard.

11. "Office Space" (1999)

"My, uh, flair?" Has anyone who's worked at a restaurant in a movie ever been happy with their job? Movie restaurants are places of sheer misery, attracting the most condescending and obnoxiously passive-aggressive kinds of managers - and Jennifer Aniston doesn't need it. Jennifer gets a chance to "express herself" and quits with "flair" in this scene from Mike Judge's now-classic comedy, the unofficial companion piece to Kevin Smith's "Clerks" as a spot-on portrait of the near-surreal day-to-day drudgery of the working stiff.

12. "Working Girl" (1988)

The best thing about this scene is Melanie Griffith actually seems to be laughing out of character as she sprays champagne all over Kevin Spacey. Her ditzy cackle brings a sense of realism to an otherwise completely contrived scene in which Spacey tries to seduce her by "accidentally" putting on a porn in the back of limo - it also distracts from lingering too long on Griffith's appallingly awful '80s hairdo (though it's nothing compared to Joan Cusack's, which you're spared from witnessing here). Anyway, Melanie proves that she's "hungry but not that hungry" when it comes to climbing the corporate ladder, thus embarking on one of the most beloved feminist journeys of '80s cinema.

13. "Stripes" (1981)

Being called a bum is the last straw for perpetual screw-up John (Bill Murray), who suddenly quits his job as a taxi driver by pulling over and abandoning the vehicle in the middle of a New York City bridge, leaving his mean-spirited passenger to find alternate transportation to the airport. The day's only going to get worse (or, in retrospect, better) for John, as he'll later get dumped by his girlfriend and lose his own car; this series of unfortunate (or, in retrospect, fortunate) events will inspire him to grab his best buddy (Harold Ramis) and join the U.S. Army. Sometimes all it takes is one irate taxi passenger to prompt a radical life change.

14. "Out of Sight" (1998)

Hell no, George Clooney's not going to be a security guard for Albert Brooks! The ego of a career bank robber gets the better of Jack Foley (Clooney) when he's offered a "lousy job with a lousy wage" by his former prison buddy in Steven Soderbergh's ultra-hip adaptation of Elmore Leonard's crime novel. Clooney's not yet the seasoned film actor he is now in this flick (that random point to Brooks at the mention of "bank robbers with pension plans" is a little awkward), but he's still super-cool George Clooney, with Brooks playing a sort of white collar version of his villain role in "Drive."

15. "Jerry Maguire" (1996)

Technically, sports agent Jerry Maguire (Tom Cruise) didn't quit, he was fired, but this still makes for one of the best-ever "exit" scenes in the history of cinema. Upon turning 35, Jerry suddenly has a crisis of conscience about the corrupt industry he works in and writes a brutally honest article that ends up being a little too revelatory for the bosses' comfort; Jerry gets canned, but he's not going out without a rousing, Cameron Crowe-penned speech. Cruise is fantastic in this scene, as is his goldfish.

16. "Parenthood" (1989)

Family comes before putting in overtime so clients can get laid in Ron Howard's ensemble dramedy, with Steve Martin realizing that nothing he does at work is ever going to be good enough for his bosses as long as he's got a wife and kids to steal his attention from the office. The former wild and crazy guy of "Saturday Night Live" can't help but go a little over-the-top in this scene (he does a particular weird hand gesture with "Aren't you dazzled?" that he doesn't seem to think works himself), but his everyman charm keeps you rooting for him as he chooses being a husband and father over putting together deals for ungrateful suits with questionable priorities.

17. "Scarface" (1983)

"I gotta protect my investment!" Oh, Tony - if you had just stayed at your greasy spoon job and at least tried to make an honest living like the rest of the Cuban refugees, maybe you wouldn't have ended up riddled with bullets and done a belly-flop into your indoor pool-fountain thing. Tony Montana (Al Pacino) and his pal Manny (Steven Bauer) decide to commit to a life of crime full-time in this scene, literally throwing their towels into the face of their employer and leaving him to do all of the dirty dishes himself. One of the most epic rises to power and descents into hell will soon ensue.

18. "Two Weeks Notice" (2002)

Yeah, after years of working 18-hour days, seven days a week for a lawyer who treats her more like a nanny than a colleague, let a girl have her stapler, would ya? Sandra Bullock tries to leave her job with quiet dignity, but all it takes is one person to challenge her about so-called "company property" for all of the anger and frustration involved with being overworked and unappreciated to explode all over the place. Wouldn't you know it, Hugh Grant plays the boss in this, too, though he's a little less of a jerk here than he was in "Bridget Jones' Diary." Anyway, let this be a lesson to anyone who ever sees someone taking office supplies on their last day - just look the other way.

19. "Bridget Jones's Diary" (2001)

There's been a countless number of scenes where the person quitting their job is oh so calm, collected and witty as the boss - who usually deserves being told off and then some - gets all flustered and exasperated but remains powerless and is ultimately mega-humiliated, usually in front of the rest of the office. "Bridget Jones' Diary" has one of those scenes, with Renee Zellweger never breaking a sweat (or her fake British accent) as she tells that sleazy lovable fop Hugh Grant that he can stick his six-weeks-notice policy where the sun don't shine.

20. "Wanted" (2008)

James McAvoy tells off his abrasive boss in front of the whole office in this scene from Timur Bekmambetov's geeked-out action flick, an act of defiance that puts him on the path of embracing his destiny as the son of a professional assassin. Bekmambetov's style is so over-the-top and undisciplined that the scene is more bizarre than cathartic, but McAvoy's effortless likability keeps it at least somewhat grounded in something resembling reality. The cherry on top is a keyboard to Chris Pratt's face; that'll teach you to sleep with Charles Xavier's girlfriend, pal.
 
2012-01-17 11:40:46 AM
Whatever, list is fail without Waiting
 
2012-01-17 11:42:08 AM

AmazinTim: That site crashed my Chrome. Twice.


Ditto
 
2012-01-17 11:44:31 AM
What movie is the headline from?

redmid17: Whatever, list is fail without Waiting


That was my first thought, but he ended up not quitting.
 
2012-01-17 11:44:37 AM
i149.photobucket.com
GO F**K YOURSELF, SAN DIEGO!!

Wait, that's not right...
 
2012-01-17 11:46:00 AM
Pandora's Litterbox: Thanks for that!
 
2012-01-17 11:46:35 AM

gunga galunga: What movie is the headline from?


Half Baked.
 
2012-01-17 11:46:42 AM

gunga galunga: What movie is the headline from?

redmid17: Whatever, list is fail without Waiting

That was my first thought, but he ended up not quitting.


We're talking semantics here. He quit, walked out, and was begged to take his job back by an in-awe Ryan Reynolds.
 
2012-01-17 11:47:09 AM

AmazinTim: That site crashed my Chrome. Twice.


Every time I've tried to use Chrome, it's crashed. Don't have those issues with Firefox.
 
2012-01-17 11:50:54 AM
Glad Wanted made it on the list. That was probably the best scene in the movie. It fails to mention that when he takes the keyboard to his buddy's face, the keys pop off and spell out "F#CK YOU" (uncensored, of course).

The rest of the movie was a mess, but the scenes of him at the office dealing with his boss were gold.
 
2012-01-17 11:51:33 AM

Pandora's Litterbox: As I'm twiddling thumbs while waiting on a phone call, here's the list:

...


You're a hero, today.

/blocked at work
 
2012-01-17 11:52:50 AM

redmid17: gunga galunga: What movie is the headline from?

redmid17: Whatever, list is fail without Waiting

That was my first thought, but he ended up not quitting.

We're talking semantics here. He quit, walked out, and was begged to take his job back by an in-awe Ryan Reynolds.


That was an awesome rant.That alone shifted the movie from thumbs down to thumbs up. I enjoyed it but was really bothered by the Justin Long and Ryan Reynolds characters, so when John Francis Daley called them out for the same reason I disliked them, it made the movie for me. Especially his gratuitous jab at Dane Cook.
 
2012-01-17 11:54:24 AM

Mugato: There were a lot of people complaining about jobs most of us today would kill for in 1999. American Beauty, Office Space (the programmers, not the waitress), Fight Club, Free Enterprise, The Matrix. Kids watching those movies today would have to ask WTF they were biatching about.


I was thinking about that the other day in regards to Office Space. I bet a lot of people who had those jobs wishes they had them back. I guess sometimes boring is better than the alternative.

Forgot about Stripes. That was a good one.
 
2012-01-17 11:56:25 AM
Decent list.

One of my personal favorites, though, is from Batman Returns. Riddler "firing" his former boss. Just the way Jim Carey paces the lines.
 
2012-01-17 11:59:12 AM

PizzaJedi81: Pandora's Litterbox: Thanks for that!


Seconded. I could only get the first five as well.
 
2012-01-17 12:03:12 PM

gunga galunga: redmid17: gunga galunga: What movie is the headline from?

redmid17: Whatever, list is fail without Waiting

That was my first thought, but he ended up not quitting.

We're talking semantics here. He quit, walked out, and was begged to take his job back by an in-awe Ryan Reynolds.

That was an awesome rant.That alone shifted the movie from thumbs down to thumbs up. I enjoyed it but was really bothered by the Justin Long and Ryan Reynolds characters, so when John Francis Daley called them out for the same reason I disliked them, it made the movie for me. Especially his gratuitous jab at Dane Cook.


Yeah that scene was great. My biggest problem with that movie was the part when Justin Long's old classmate shows up and pulls that move with the tip. It tied in a bit too well, plus I couldn't imagine someone having the balls/being enough of an asshole to actually do that.
 
2012-01-17 12:04:27 PM
I expected falling down to get a mention.
 
2012-01-17 12:05:24 PM
cache.boston.com
 
2012-01-17 12:05:49 PM

Jake Havechek: The "Reality Bites" one was the funniest, best part of that sucky, patronizing movie.


I thought the best part was when Winona Ryder and Jeannean Garofalo took off their clothes and made out with each other for an hour.

/Well, that's what happened in my imagination.
 
2012-01-17 12:05:50 PM

FreakinB: gunga galunga: redmid17: gunga galunga: What movie is the headline from?

redmid17: Whatever, list is fail without Waiting

That was my first thought, but he ended up not quitting.

We're talking semantics here. He quit, walked out, and was begged to take his job back by an in-awe Ryan Reynolds.

That was an awesome rant.That alone shifted the movie from thumbs down to thumbs up. I enjoyed it but was really bothered by the Justin Long and Ryan Reynolds characters, so when John Francis Daley called them out for the same reason I disliked them, it made the movie for me. Especially his gratuitous jab at Dane Cook.

Yeah that scene was great. My biggest problem with that movie was the part when Justin Long's old classmate shows up and pulls that move with the tip. It tied in a bit too well, plus I couldn't imagine someone having the balls/being enough of an asshole to actually do that.


You haven't met some of the people I went to college with then. I can't see an engineer doing that, but I can see an I-banker/Finance dude doing that.
 
2012-01-17 12:05:52 PM

albert71292: AmazinTim: That site crashed my Chrome. Twice.

Every time I've tried to use Chrome, it's crashed. Don't have those issues with Firefox.


What color is the sky in your universe? Firefox does nothing but eat up memory and crash on every computer I've had.
 
Displayed 50 of 112 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report