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(Washington Post)   Super Bowl ad placement begs the question: Should Jesus be marketed alongside Cialis? Why not, they're both all about getting wood to nail people   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 69
    More: Silly, Cialis, Washington Post, Super Bowl Commercials, begs the question, Phil Simms, Ed O'Keefe, wood, Benetton  
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1064 clicks; posted to Sports » on 16 Jan 2012 at 9:19 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-16 09:01:04 AM  
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."



What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
 
2012-01-16 09:18:59 AM  
That article had nothing to do with Super Bowl ads, which begs the question, "Who is greenlighting these things?"
 
2012-01-16 09:21:37 AM  

calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


You're big fun at parties I bet.
 
2012-01-16 09:23:10 AM  
"getting wood to nail people" is an awfully large reach for the headline joke.
 
2012-01-16 09:28:24 AM  

lajotu: "getting wood to nail people" is an awfully large reach for the headline joke.


It's not that bad, considering the product. It does however beg the question; Whatever happened to Horny goat weed?
 
2012-01-16 09:29:15 AM  

calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


While you are absolutely correct... Decaf dude. Decaf.
 
2012-01-16 09:33:32 AM  
Jesus,..Viagra....

Jesus,...Viagra,...

Jesus,,, Jeeeeeesuuuuuussssss.....VIAGRAAAAAAAAAAA/!

There, I've just made the world's most annoying commercial both worse & more offensive to a significant portion of the USA's population. You're welcome.
 
2012-01-16 09:35:03 AM  

calbert: What is "Begging the Question?"


To raise the obvious question: did you type all that out or have prepared in advance to cut and paste into the comments box? Either way shows a tremendous amount of commitment and not a little obsessive compulsive behavior.

/NTTAWT
 
2012-01-16 09:36:16 AM  

calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


I'm totally with you, it's very ironic how often this phrase is misused these days.
 
2012-01-16 09:37:16 AM  
Has anyone mentioned that Tebow is a southpaw and in many religious circles left handedness is a sign of the DEVIL!
 
2012-01-16 09:44:09 AM  
We already saw the Focus on the Family spot during the AFC game. My atheist jaw was on the floor.
 
2012-01-16 09:44:55 AM  

stevie1der:
I'm totally with you, it's very ironic how often this phrase is misused these days.


I see what you did there... and I like it.
 
2012-01-16 09:46:17 AM  

stevie1der: calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."

I'm totally with you, it's very ironic how often this phrase is misused these days.


Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.
 
2012-01-16 09:54:23 AM  
Is it possible that I could watch football without ads for Jesus or Cialis?
 
2012-01-16 09:57:10 AM  

babysealclubber:

Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.


i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-01-16 09:59:21 AM  

babysealclubber: stevie1der: calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."

I'm totally with you, it's very ironic how often this phrase is misused these days.

Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.


I'm literally on board with you guys.
 
2012-01-16 10:01:49 AM  

babysealclubber: Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.


That isn't a good excuse for misused words or phrases.

I could care less how long something has been misused, if it's wrong, it's wrong.
 
2012-01-16 10:08:12 AM  

Obscure Login: babysealclubber: Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.

That isn't a good excuse for misused words or phrases.

I could care less how long something has been misused, if it's wrong, it's wrong.


Your post is totally radical
 
2012-01-16 10:09:00 AM  

calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."



Which begs the question, why not?
 
2012-01-16 10:09:16 AM  
This thread is going to reveal who you would, or wouldn't want to hang out with.
 
2012-01-16 10:10:45 AM  
"Andrew Wood's death changed things for a few weeks. I probably got even heavier into drugs after that." - Layne Staley

I don't know about Cialis, holmes but me and my boys take Viagra at parties. Yall know you've experienced whiskey dork before. That's the worse, bro. Drinkin is good because it makes ya last longer but there's like a ratio to how much you can take. Unless U grab urself a blue pill out of the fish bowl. Then U can bang the crap out of whoeva u want for as long as u want. Sometimes u want even pop but your ass will be legendary. Total God Mode.
 
2012-01-16 10:11:40 AM  

Obscure Login: babysealclubber: Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.

That isn't a good excuse for misused words or phrases.

I could care less how long something has been misused, if it's wrong, it's wrong.


And that my friends is the sound of jet engines flying low passes right over Obscure Login's house.
 
2012-01-16 10:11:57 AM  
If you think "begs the question"brings out the crazy in a FARK thread just wait until you see the lunatics scuttle out of the woodwork when they show a Focus on the Family ad during a football game. Hissy fit doesnt even begin to describe it.
 
2012-01-16 10:14:11 AM  

mikaloyd: If you think "begs the question"brings out the crazy in a FARK thread just wait until you see the lunatics scuttle out of the woodwork when they show a Focus on the Family ad during a football game. Hissy fit doesnt even begin to describe it.


It is all part of Super Bowl Sunday fun.
 
2012-01-16 10:15:34 AM  

poisonedpawn78: Obscure Login: babysealclubber: Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.

That isn't a good excuse for misused words or phrases.

I could care less how long something has been misused, if it's wrong, it's wrong.

And that my friends is the sound of jet engines flying low passes right over Obscure Login's house.


Umm... Methinks you're the one who has to look out the window, chief.
 
2012-01-16 10:16:30 AM  
i farkING

babysealclubber: stevie1der: calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."

I'm totally with you, it's very ironic how often this phrase is misused these days.

Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the language.


I absolutely farking hate when people use "beg the question" wrong. Though, I would rather that become wide spread and have myself set on fire then having the use of irregardless become accepted as a real word but the majority of farktards who claim to speak English. fark that noise.
 
2012-01-16 10:21:57 AM  

dmars: Though, I would rather that become wide spread and have myself set on fire then having the use of irregardless become accepted as a real word but the majority of farktards who claim to speak English. fark that noise.


That is the actual script of the actor who plays the Hamburglar.
 
2012-01-16 10:22:16 AM  

calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."... *SNIP*


Don't let the other posts in this thread discourage you. I'm not sure why it's okay to post angry flower cartoons in response to errant apostrophes while posts misusing phrases are to be ignored.

Let me tell you a story about my sister-in-law. Now, I love my brother, but he has saddled himself with the most ridiculous human being possible. Typical GED big-haired suburban Boston chick. One of the things that annoys me about her is that she misuses phrases and words like this all the time. Most of the time she's not even close. For example, she bought a used car she liked, but not the color she wanted and said, "Not to be a doubting Thomas, but I wish it was red." I used to ignore her when they first started dating. But after they got married it got worse. Words would fly out of her mouth with no regard to meaning. "I hope it doesn't rain this weekend, but I guess that's inhospitable to expect." After a while I started to correct her, she'd get pissed, and argue that it didn't matter because I understood what she was trying to say. "I don't know why you're filled with transgressions for me, but keep them to yourself," she'd say. They're still together, and my wife and I now pass the time at family gatherings making notes of her words-of-the-day. Fark, don't let this happen to you. Support posts like this.
 
2012-01-16 10:26:38 AM  
This pretentious ponderous collection of religious rock psalms is enough to prompt the question, "What day did the Lord create Spinal Tap, and couldn't he have rested on that day too?"
 
2012-01-16 10:27:20 AM  

mikaloyd: If you think "begs the question"brings out the crazy in a FARK thread just wait until you see the lunatics scuttle out of the woodwork when they show a Focus on the Family ad during a football game. Hissy fit doesnt even begin to describe it.


"However much I dislike the idea of abortion, you should not criminalize a woman who, in very difficult circumstances, makes that choice" - Tony Blair

I'm with this bloke, bro. But take it another foot forward. If it wasn't for options I'd have like 6 kidz now & I'm only 21s. Just think about some of the mistakes that other ppl make. Every1 makes mistakes. There ain't not anti-mistake vaccine or an undo button. So U gots to do the second best thang for ur family. But they charge 2 much for an abortion and alls I'll say is it's a good thing planned parenthood takes credit cards.
 
2012-01-16 10:29:15 AM  
I wonder if the mod that posted in the thread Saturday night is watching this?
 
2012-01-16 10:29:47 AM  

WinoRhino: calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."... *SNIP*

Don't let the other posts in this thread discourage you. I'm not sure why it's okay to post angry flower cartoons in response to errant apostrophes while posts misusing phrases are to be ignored.

Let me tell you a story about my sister-in-law. Now, I love my brother, but he has saddled himself with the most ridiculous human being possible. Typical GED big-haired suburban Boston chick. One of the things that annoys me about her is that she misuses phrases and words like this all the time. Most of the time she's not even close. For example, she bought a used car she liked, but not the color she wanted and said, "Not to be a doubting Thomas, but I wish it was red." I used to ignore her when they first started dating. But after they got married it got worse. Words would fly out of her mouth with no regard to meaning. "I hope it doesn't rain this weekend, but I guess that's inhospitable to expect." After a while I started to correct her, she'd get pissed, and argue that it didn't matter because I understood what she was trying to say. "I don't know why you're filled with transgressions for me, but keep them to yourself," she'd say. They're still together, and my wife and I now pass the time at family gatherings making notes of her words-of-the-day. Fark, don't let this happen to you. Support posts like this.


wow, I think I'd have to kill her.
 
2012-01-16 10:30:57 AM  
They just quoted John 3:16 (this is from the NIV): "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life."

First, I think it's pretty funny that an organization called Focus on the Family is coming out strongly in favor of sacrificing one's children.

But this is also one of the most nonsensical lines in the Gospels. How does it make sense for someone to be God's one and only son? It makes sense for a human being to have an only son, but how does that relationship fit for a deity? Did God provide half of Jesus' DNA? Is there even such a thing as divine DNA, and if so, wouldn't it mean that God is just an organism? And if God isn't an organism and whipped up super-special divine DNA for this particular occasion, how does that differ in substance from the creation of Adam, all of whose DNA would have to have been created by God (instead of just half), giving him some claim to be an earlier son?

Furthermore, doesn't this mean that God loves everyone else MORE than his only son, since he allowed that son to be tortured for everyone else? Even if you say that on the contrary, God loved his only son more (which seems to contradict the notion that God loves each of us unconditionally) but still decided to sacrifice him for the benefit of everyone else, to what extent is that really a sacrifice for God, since his son is just going to come back from it, and since God already knows the outcome of the whole thing?

Add to that the problem of how in the world sending your only son to be tortured and killed by people you don't approve of somehow leads to the salvation of those very people if only they believe that it really was your son that you gave them to torture and kill. It's as if you told someone you were unable to forgive, "Oh, the reason I can't forgive you is that you haven't absolutely done the worst thing possible to me just yet. How about if you torture and kill my only son? Do that, show some remorse about it, and then we'll be even for everything, 'kay?"
 
2012-01-16 10:34:26 AM  
Can you really pay for an abortion with a credit card? I usually just put them on layaway.
 
2012-01-16 10:34:59 AM  
Onward heathen soldiers
Marching as to war
See an ad for Jesus
Scream like unpaid whores
 
2012-01-16 10:35:15 AM  
Focus on the Family spokesman Gary Schneeberger told the Denver Post before the ad aired that the group fully anticipated complaints: "We will hear about shoving religion down people's throats. But if it's okay to shove Doritos down people's throats, and cars and everything else, we have the right to advertise, too."


Oh, what to say about these wankstains? Take your pick:

"Doritos isn't trying to make my gay friend a second-class citizen."

"A right to advertise? That sounds like a corporation talking, one that should be taxed normally."

"You guys really seem to love talking about shoving things down people's throats - I thought you guys were Protestants."

Oh, and Best In The World? I favorited you in the same special color as Pocket Ninja and Meowsaidthedog. I expect good things from you in the years to come.

/favorited as "I.......wait, what???"
 
2012-01-16 10:37:09 AM  

babysealclubber: wow, I think I'd have to kill her.


I have stories... I could fill entire threads. And this is the least annoying thing about her. One time she joined a tupperware group to earn extra money (yeah... seriously.) She took checks for orders placed by my mom and her friends who were trying to help her out and she never placed the orders. Instead she spent the money and told everyone she got ripped off and that it was a "tupperware scam."
 
2012-01-16 10:39:11 AM  

GimpyNip: Can you really pay for an abortion with a credit card? I usually just put them on layaway.


I tried that. They let my ex keep the baby until I paid it off in full. By then I was out $500 and had to dispose of a 3-year-old's body. Just pay the monthly interest.
 
2012-01-16 10:39:24 AM  

Vodka Zombie: babysealclubber: stevie1der: calbert: To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."


What is "Begging the Question?"

"Begging the question" is a form of logical fallacy in which a statement or claim is assumed to be true without evidence other than the statement or claim itself. When one begs the question, the initial assumption of a statement is treated as already proven without any logic to show why the statement is true in the first place.

A simple example would be "I think he is unattractive because he is ugly." The adjective "ugly" does not explain why the subject is "unattractive" -- they virtually amount to the same subjective meaning, and the proof is merely a restatement of the premise. The sentence has begged the question.
What is it Not?

To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question." (e.g. "It begs the question, why is he so dumb?") This is a common error of usage made by those who mistake the word "question" in the phrase to refer to a literal question. Sadly, the error has grown more and more common with time, such that even journalists, advertisers, and major mass media entities have fallen prey to "BTQ Abuse."

While descriptivists and other such laissez-faire linguists are content to allow the misconception to fall into the vernacular, it cannot be denied that logic and philosophy stand to lose an important conceptual label should the meaning of BTQ become diluted to the point that we must constantly distinguish between the traditional usage and the erroneous "modern" usage.


To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."
To beg the question does not mean "to raise the question."

I'm totally with you, it's very ironic how often this phrase is misused these days.

Irregardless, once something is misused so much, it becomes part of the ...


I could care less.
 
2012-01-16 10:43:22 AM  

fatalvenom: This thread is going to reveal who you would, or wouldn't want to hang out with.


The kind of people you'd invite over to watch the soccer programme and have a nice pop?
 
2012-01-16 10:52:27 AM  

Impasse: a nice pop


Talk about starting a REAL religious flamewar.

/it's soda, it doesn't go "pop"
//it goes "whoosh", but no one calls it whoosh
 
2012-01-16 10:54:09 AM  

UNC_Samurai: Focus on the Family spokesman Gary Schneeberger told the Denver Post before the ad aired that the group fully anticipated complaints: "We will hear about shoving religion down people's throats. But if it's okay to shove Doritos down people's throats, and cars and everything else, we have the right to advertise, too."


Oh, what to say about these wankstains? Take your pick:

"Doritos isn't trying to make my gay friend a second-class citizen."

"A right to advertise? That sounds like a corporation talking, one that should be taxed normally."

"You guys really seem to love talking about shoving things down people's throats - I thought you guys were Protestants."

Oh, and Best In The World? I favorited you in the same special color as Pocket Ninja and Meowsaidthedog. I expect good things from you in the years to come.

/favorited as "I.......wait, what???"


You might also say that the ad is a bait and switch. It makes it seem as if the organization is simply a mainstream Christian group wanting to remind believers of one of the central tenets of their faith. But it's actually anti-gay, anti-science, anti-choice, and anti-Democrat, whereas mainstream Christians aren't necessarily any of those things.
 
2012-01-16 11:10:09 AM  

WinoRhino: GimpyNip: Can you really pay for an abortion with a credit card? I usually just put them on layaway.

I tried that. They let my ex keep the baby until I paid it off in full. By then I was out $500 and had to dispose of a 3-year-old's body. Just pay the monthly interest.


iamelleinad.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-01-16 11:14:38 AM  

WinoRhino: Now, I love my brother, but he has saddled himself with the most ridiculous human being possible. Typical GED big-haired suburban Boston chick. One of the things that annoys me about her is that she misuses phrases and words like this all the time. Most of the time she's not even close. For example, she bought a used car she liked, but not the color she wanted and said, "Not to be a doubting Thomas, but I wish it was red."


Ever consider that your brother finds her amusing and she can probably suck a billiard ball thru a garden hose?
/just sayin....
 
2012-01-16 11:20:04 AM  

mikaloyd: Onward heathen soldiers
Marching as to war
See an ad for Jesus
Scream like unpaid whores


Both Tebow and the Saints go down this weekend....don't worry, your bitterness isn't showing at all.
 
2012-01-16 11:20:05 AM  

UNC_Samurai: Impasse: a nice pop

Talk about starting a REAL religious flamewar.

/it's soda, it doesn't go "pop"
//it goes "whoosh", but no one calls it whoosh


You're mistaken as well. It's Coke, not pop or soda. Sort of like how cotton swabs are called Q-Tips or multi-purpose tools are called Gerbers.
 
2012-01-16 11:20:25 AM  
I use "begs the question" wrong just to troll you people who actually put this much thought into a phrase that not once has lead to confusion or misunderstanding as to what the person using the phrase meant.
 
2012-01-16 11:24:16 AM  

WinoRhino: GimpyNip: Can you really pay for an abortion with a credit card? I usually just put them on layaway.

I tried that. They let my ex keep the baby until I paid it off in full. By then I was out $500 and had to dispose of a 3-year-old's body. Just pay the monthly interest.


Ha!
 
2012-01-16 11:33:16 AM  

Kurmudgeon: Ever consider that your brother finds her amusing and she can probably suck a billiard ball thru a garden hose?
/just sayin....


She probably can. We can ask the guy she had an affair with. He might know more than my brother.
 
2012-01-16 11:47:53 AM  

UNC_Samurai: Focus on the Family spokesman Gary Schneeberger told the Denver Post before the ad aired that the group fully anticipated complaints: "We will hear about shoving religion down people's throats. But if it's okay to shove Doritos down people's throats, and cars and everything else, we have the right to advertise, too."


Oh, what to say about these wankstains? Take your pick:

"Doritos isn't trying to make my gay friend a second-class citizen."

"A right to advertise? That sounds like a corporation talking, one that should be taxed normally."

"You guys really seem to love talking about shoving things down people's throats - I thought you guys were Protestants."


Ya, that was the point where I stopped too. It couldn't get dumber than a person trying to equate proselytizing a version of the faith that involves hate and hypocrisy with getting the god-damned munchies.
 
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