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(Gigwise)   "Doubts Raised Over The Future Of Guitar Music." Raised by whom? Yanni? Zamfir, master of the pan flute?   (gigwise.com) divider line 108
    More: Unlikely, Doubts Raised, flutes, the future, Snow Patrol, contact music, Kasabian, guitars, Too Short  
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2341 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 11 Jan 2012 at 11:39 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-12 09:19:31 AM
Browse your local Craigslist for musicians some time. Guitarists are no prob, but try finding a drummer! Also, I find it increasingly hilarious to see ads citing 90s alt-rock bands as influences, yet they don't want anyone older than 22 or so in the band. Seriously? We lived and grew up playing that music when it was fresh. Do something new young people!

/my lawn...
 
2012-01-12 09:22:53 AM
all I have is a red guitar, three cords and the truth
all I have is a red guitar, the rest is up to you
 
2012-01-12 09:25:04 AM
Really? no one?

whoaorno.com
 
2012-01-12 10:06:30 AM

IoSaturnalia: Strik3r: If you say so, it MUST be true. ... But if it helps you sleep at night, take comfort in your ignorance.

LOL - I'm ignorant for pointing out that musical instrument styles have changed in the last 1000 years. It looks like you saved up that rant for subby and then unloaded it on me without actually reading my post.

And it is spelled is 'niche'.


No. You seem oblivious to the fact that though instruments do cycle in and out of popularity, many/most of them introduce styles and techniques that make them unique and the focus of that particular style. Even if the style falls out of popularity, it is typically still tied to the instrument.Certain types of music are inherrintly "guitar music" becuase that's the focus. Even if this style "falls out of popularity", the instrument itself and the style it brings will always be associated with each other.

So, i guess, I object to your statement "The guitar is going to die". (It makes me laugh, really) Submitter made the statement about guitar music which I find much more likely, though still doubtful. While guitar music may become less popular, there will always be those who prefer it and I really think there's no chance in hell the guitar itself will die. It's become an iconic instrument.
 
2012-01-12 10:29:44 AM
Bathia_Mapes

"Quentin Tarantino always picks the best music for his movies."

Yes... Yes he does.

As long as there are guitar players, guitar music will never die. And even if all guitar players disappeared from the face of the earth tomorrow, fark soulless computer-generated dance "music", and fark rap.

No soul = not music.

Why yes, I am old and white! Thanks for asking. Now get off my lawn.
 
2012-01-12 10:46:50 AM

Strik3r: No. You seem oblivious to the fact that though instruments do cycle in and out of popularity, many/most of them introduce styles and techniques that make them unique and the focus of that particular style. Even if the style falls out of popularity, it is typically still tied to the instrument.Certain types of music are inherrintly "guitar music" becuase that's the focus. Even if this style "falls out of popularity", the instrument itself and the style it brings will always be associated with each other.


Once again, you are responding to a strawman of your own making. All I said was that musical instrument styles change over the years: the Krumhorn becomes the Trumpet, the Lyre becomes the Guitar. Nothing more, nothing less. You seemed determined to argue against some perceived prediction of the end of stringed instruments when I posted nothing of the sort.

Strik3r: So, i guess, I object to your statement "The guitar is going to die".


No, I said 'If the guitar is going to fade and die, it's going to fade and die.' and then followed it with an example of the evolution of a horned instrument and the evolution of the stringed instrument. The obvious conclusion there (to someone who actually wants tor read what I wrote and not see some self-inflicted strawman) is that in the next 1000 years the stringed instruments will evolve into something else. The king is dead, long live the king.

Strik3r: It makes me laugh, really


No it didn't. You went off on personal attack rant, with a little caps lock and some insults and non-sequiturs thrown in (misguided information about the future of musical instruments help me sleep at night. Really?). Shocked the hell out of me - I thought we were just having a nice conversation about the history and future of music, not some politics tab throwdown.
 
2012-01-12 10:56:38 AM

GibbyTheMole: Why yes, I am old and white! Thanks for asking. Now get off my lawn.


Actually you sound like teenager
 
2012-01-12 11:02:58 AM
At first it was just the notion that the guitar would die that made me laugh. Now it's just you.

LOL

Yep.Iinstruments can fall wayyy out of popularity. I laugh (again) at the idea that the guitar will die completely. Even those instruments you've listed though perhaps not popular, still are used (rarely, but used) in music today. To me, that means the instrument lives.

Face it. Subby proposed the idea that guitar MUSIC (that's to emphasize that he was talking about music and is not some caps lock rant) might be fading in popularity and you took the MUSIC out of his headline. That's an entirely different context and is not what the article suggests.

Apparently you took offense to the my comment about you living in ignorance. I apologize for offending you (that's right. an apology on FARK). In my own defense, I didn't CALL (again, that's emphasis) you ignorant,. I said you can live in it if you want and I mean it.
 
2012-01-12 11:03:16 AM

hbk72777: [img600.imageshack.us image 493x341]


Came here literally just for this. Fark never fails me.
 
2012-01-12 11:03:47 AM
Oh ya ... ^^^^^^^ previous @ lo Saturnalia
 
2012-01-12 11:15:06 AM
i2.listal.com
 
2012-01-12 11:19:39 AM
Guitar music moved to Japan.

img651.imageshack.us
 
2012-01-12 11:23:55 AM

TommyymmoT: Noel Gallagher h


What the fark would he know about Rock. His music is bland pop just like all the rest of the radio shiate.
 
2012-01-12 11:27:36 AM
Since the dawn of recorded music there has been tons of great guitar music forgotten by the mainstream. From Delta blues, bluegrass, old timey country and various folk songs, 50's rockabilly, surf music, 60's garage rock, all the various forms of metal and punk and much more. It's all available on youtube. I spend a lot of time discovering great old music and I'm sure there's a lot of young kids that do, too. Who cares what the masses like? Let the goons have their electronic music.
 
2012-01-12 11:36:22 AM

coldones: Since the dawn of recorded music there has been tons of great guitar music forgotten by the mainstream. From Delta blues, bluegrass, old timey country and various folk songs, 50's rockabilly, surf music, 60's garage rock, all the various forms of metal and punk and much more. It's all available on youtube. I spend a lot of time discovering great old music and I'm sure there's a lot of young kids that do, too. Who cares what the masses like? Let the goons have their electronic music.


For instance: Tony MacAlpine (new window)
 
2012-01-12 11:42:22 AM

coldones: Since the dawn of recorded music there has been tons of great guitar music forgotten by the mainstream. From Delta blues, bluegrass, old timey country and various folk songs, 50's rockabilly, surf music, 60's garage rock, all the various forms of metal and punk and much more. It's all available on youtube. I spend a lot of time discovering great old music and I'm sure there's a lot of young kids that do, too. Who cares what the masses like? Let the goons have their electronic music.


I wonder how many people today would even know who Dick Dale is if his awesome playing hadn't kick started Pulp Fiction. I'm including myself in that - that's where I heard him first.

Makes you wonder how many other great guitarists kind of faded into obscurity.

Don't know if you guys have been watching Metal Evolution on VH1C, but I'm finding out about a whole lof of older bands that I didn't know about/take the time to listen to. Currently listening to The MC5.
 
2012-01-12 11:50:04 AM
Stupid Baby Boomer paranoia is stupid, and paranoid.
 
2012-01-12 11:59:45 AM

pngwnpwr: Browse your local Craigslist for musicians some time. Guitarists are no prob, but try finding a drummer! Also, I find it increasingly hilarious to see ads citing 90s alt-rock bands as influences, yet they don't want anyone older than 22 or so in the band. Seriously? We lived and grew up playing that music when it was fresh. Do something new young people!

/my lawn...


The problem there is that most of those guitarists suck balls. NTTAWWT

And there are 21 guitar players to every drummer, 50 guitar players to every bassist (that isn't a guitard masquerading as one).

Look, I don't need to be futzing around in rehearsal listening to a guy that has no pocket, no sense of time or phrasing, trying to shred a line like a robot.

WTF ever happened to groove?
 
2012-01-12 12:12:10 PM

Orgasmatron138: coldones: Since the dawn of recorded music there has been tons of great guitar music forgotten by the mainstream. From Delta blues, bluegrass, old timey country and various folk songs, 50's rockabilly, surf music, 60's garage rock, all the various forms of metal and punk and much more. It's all available on youtube. I spend a lot of time discovering great old music and I'm sure there's a lot of young kids that do, too. Who cares what the masses like? Let the goons have their electronic music.

I wonder how many people today would even know who Dick Dale is if his awesome playing hadn't kick started Pulp Fiction. I'm including myself in that - that's where I heard him first.

Makes you wonder how many other great guitarists kind of faded into obscurity.

Don't know if you guys have been watching Metal Evolution on VH1C, but I'm finding out about a whole lof of older bands that I didn't know about/take the time to listen to. Currently listening to The MC5.


Also, I think from Pulp Fiction or some other Tarantino movie is Link Wray, the inventor of the power chord:
Link (new window)

Here's great article on his life.
Link (new window)

My advice is to read the article and then look up the songs on youtube as they are mentioned.
 
2012-01-12 12:49:18 PM

Orgasmatron138: I wonder how many people today would even know who Dick Dale is if his awesome playing hadn't kick started Pulp Fiction. I'm including myself in that - that's where I heard him first.

Makes you wonder how many other great guitarists kind of faded into obscurity.

Don't know if you guys have been watching Metal Evolution on VH1C, but I'm finding out about a whole lof of older bands that I didn't know about/take the time to listen to. Currently listening to The MC5.


Yep, there is so much out there that you just don't hear on the radio and other 'mainstream' outlets.

A couple of my favs that are stil cranking out quality music and could give a shiat that they aren't played over the airwaves.

Knopfler (new window)

JJ Cale (new window)

/although for Cale, there is even a shortage of his material on Youtute.
 
2012-01-12 01:12:24 PM
 
2012-01-12 01:20:32 PM

IoSaturnalia: the Krumhorn becomes the Trumpet


Well technically the natural trumpet became the valved trumpet and the krummhorn (and the vaguely trumpet-like cornetto) just disappeared for a few hundred years, but I'm just being pedantic here.
 
2012-01-12 02:10:44 PM
I love it when self-proclaimed music aficionados tell me they discovered hugely popular guitarists by watching a Tarantino movie. No time to flip through the used record bin, or these days, the interwebs, better let Hollywood tell me what it's ok to like.
 
2012-01-12 02:24:47 PM
Take a deep breath everybody....

Guitar music (all styles) is doing fine. Live music in general is in trouble and that affects guitar based music more than some others but other than that its doing fine.

There is still good stuff bubbling up from the underground. I play in a band with guys much younger than myself (they invited me, go figure) and the other bands we play with do some really interesting stuff I wouldnt have heard playing with the get off my lawn crowd.

As long as I still see gaggles of kids at the guitar shows....were gonna be ok.
 
2012-01-12 02:33:39 PM

Zerochance: You can go to any Guitar Center


But...why?

There are so many killer guitars up on ebay. I've bought and sold high mid-range guitars on ebay for the last 10 years and never had a problem. As long as the seller has a good rating and the pics are very descriptive...and most people selling guitars on the net know how to get that down the neck shot showing action and neck relieve that is really the meat of any guitars playability.
 
2012-01-12 02:35:13 PM

TommyymmoT: "In recent weeks a number of musicians including Kasabian and Noel Gallagher have spoken about the lack of rock n' roll bands in today's charts"

It's cyclical, just like the 70s when disco reared it's ugly head.
There were a few flash in the pan pop artists that were supposedly the next big thing.

Hip hop is just disco minus the melody and the musicians.


It's not cyclical, it's systemic. Back in the day if you wanted to make music you picked up a guitar and learned to play it. The advent of synth technology has made that obsolete. Why would I learn to play that when I can just sit here in front of my computer and make music all I want?
 
2012-01-12 02:38:11 PM

LewDux: dugitman: Rapmaster2000: This is a repeat from 1980 (synthesizers), 1990 (techno/house), and 2000 (hip-hop).

and 1976(disco), 2006(pro-tools, autotune) etc.

and 1966(guitar effects)


Would like a word with you.

www.danformosa.com

Effects don't cover up poor musicianship. They just change the tone of the guitar.
 
2012-01-12 02:40:00 PM

part of the problem: Live music in general is in trouble and that affects guitar based music more than some others but other than that its doing fine...........


As long as I still see gaggles of kids at the guitar shows....were gonna be ok.


Excellent point and thanks for the ray of hope. ;p
 
2012-01-12 02:45:32 PM

coldones:
Also, I think from Pulp Fiction or some other Tarantino movie is Link Wray, the inventor of the power chord:


Inventor of the power chord? LOLZ!!!

That was invented by Pope Gregory in the seventh century, dude. A "Power Chord" is just a perfect 5th.
 
2012-01-12 02:49:57 PM

H31N0US: Zerochance: You can go to any Guitar Center

But...why?


Because you're a moron if you buy a guitar that you haven't physically handled.

Why *not* Guitar Center? Because their guitar people are generally minimum wage earning kids that don't know shiat about how to set up a guitar so their quality is generally pretty shiatty. That's why.

But do go buy it in person, after you've had a chance to handle it.
 
2012-01-12 02:59:48 PM

Rent Party: H31N0US: Zerochance: You can go to any Guitar Center

But...why?


Because you're a moron if you buy a guitar that you haven't physically handled.

Why *not* Guitar Center? Because their guitar people are generally minimum wage earning kids that don't know shiat about how to set up a guitar so their quality is generally pretty shiatty. That's why.

But do go buy it in person, after you've had a chance to handle it.


If your town doesnt have an independant guitar store run by people in mad crazy love with the instrument. Move.
 
2012-01-12 03:09:43 PM

part of the problem: Rent Party: H31N0US: Zerochance: You can go to any Guitar Center

But...why?


Because you're a moron if you buy a guitar that you haven't physically handled.

Why *not* Guitar Center? Because their guitar people are generally minimum wage earning kids that don't know shiat about how to set up a guitar so their quality is generally pretty shiatty. That's why.

But do go buy it in person, after you've had a chance to handle it.

If your town doesnt have an independant guitar store run by people in mad crazy love with the instrument. Move.


Indeed. It doesn't even have to be an independent store. It just has to have quality people taking care of their instruments. (For the PNW folks, that would be Johhny at the Bellevue American Music. That guy rocks, and his inventory shows it. See also: Dusty Strings.)

I shop GC when I need strings, or something electric, as their purchasing power generally means I'm paying less. If I'm buying a guitar or an amp? I shop around.
 
2012-01-12 03:13:34 PM
Some pop label guy has NO bearing on my listening and I couldn't care less about the direction of "the industry."

/levelofcare.jpg
 
2012-01-12 03:13:59 PM

gunther_bumpass: I love it when self-proclaimed music aficionados tell me they discovered hugely popular guitarists by watching a Tarantino movie. No time to flip through the used record bin, or these days, the interwebs, better let Hollywood tell me what it's ok to like.


Dick Dale and Link Wray were NEVER "hugely popular". Dick Dale did 3 or 4 albums in the 60s and was almost unknown outside of California except by other bands. Link Wray had one real hit and a bunch of singles on indie labels. They were obscure to most people who weren't guitar geeks.

Who the hell cares how people find the stuff, as long as they find it? Well, I mean other than hipster dorks like yourself who desperately want to cling to the notion that you're somehow "special" and smarter than everyone else because of your consumer purchases?
 
kab
2012-01-12 03:24:33 PM
"Doubts have been raised about the future of guitar music with one record boss admitting labels are "scared" to sign new bands."

Continue being scared, because bands don't need you any longer.

Now fark off.
 
2012-01-12 03:27:19 PM

part of the problem: Rent Party: H31N0US: Zerochance: You can go to any Guitar Center

But...why?


Because you're a moron if you buy a guitar that you haven't physically handled.

Why *not* Guitar Center? Because their guitar people are generally minimum wage earning kids that don't know shiat about how to set up a guitar so their quality is generally pretty shiatty. That's why.

But do go buy it in person, after you've had a chance to handle it.

If your town doesnt have an independant guitar store run by people in mad crazy love with the instrument. Move.


As someone who manages an independent guitar store, I'm getting an (appreciative) kick...
 
2012-01-12 03:27:43 PM

Rent Party: coldones:
Also, I think from Pulp Fiction or some other Tarantino movie is Link Wray, the inventor of the power chord:


Inventor of the power chord? LOLZ!!!

That was invented by Pope Gregory in the seventh century, dude. A "Power Chord" is just a perfect 5th.



Maybe on the guitar then? At least he popularized it?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_chord

There is disagreement over which was the first record to feature power chords. Link Wray is commonly cited as having introduced power chords with his 1958 instrumental hit "Rumble".
 
kab
2012-01-12 03:36:43 PM

coldones: There is disagreement over which was the first record to feature power chords. Link Wray is commonly cited as having introduced power chords with his 1958 instrumental hit "Rumble".


It's technically not even a chord. But I digress, bla bla.
 
2012-01-12 03:39:49 PM
Ok, I found this article on the matter, too
http://www.newyorknighttrain.com/zine/issues/2/linkw.html

"Before I proceed, Link Wray did not invent the power chord. The power chord is a combination of guitar notes, typically in the major scale, which involves the root note played on one of the lowest two strings as well as the next octave higher. It can be found in all kinds of musical forms dating back long before the electric guitar. Link Wray's distinction was not in his creation of that type of chording but his employment of it. Instead of using it primarily for background rhythmic purposes, Wray was perhaps the first notable instrumental rock musician to feature the power chord prominently as the basis of songs as opposed to the typical single string melodic line - as exemplified in "Rumble." Also, in most of the Link Wray singles that followed, simple single-string melodies tended to drive the song instead of the "Rumble" chord-basis. Perhaps due to a lack of decent source material on Wray, this, along with most of the other information from the obituaries seem to come from Cub Koda's AllMusicGuide statement ("Link Wray invented the power chord") which was not intended to be taken literally."
 
2012-01-12 03:42:38 PM

kab: coldones: There is disagreement over which was the first record to feature power chords. Link Wray is commonly cited as having introduced power chords with his 1958 instrumental hit "Rumble".

It's technically not even a chord. But I digress, bla bla.


I'll go there, too. I am of this school of thought as well, but there is a credible argument from credible people that any interval represents a chord.

I don't agree with it, but there it is.
 
2012-01-12 03:48:18 PM

GibbyTheMole: No soul = not music.


/thread
 
2012-01-12 03:48:41 PM
Could you really have a power chord without an ampllifier ?????? (not a pun on power....)

and I though you need at least 3 notes (root, 3rd, 5th) to form the most minimal "chord".
 
2012-01-12 03:53:00 PM

Strik3r:
and I though you need at least 3 notes (root, 3rd, 5th) to form the most minimal "chord".


That really depends on who you ask.
 
2012-01-12 04:14:24 PM

Charlie Freak: part of the problem: Rent Party: H31N0US: Zerochance: You can go to any Guitar Center

But...why?


Because you're a moron if you buy a guitar that you haven't physically handled.

Why *not* Guitar Center? Because their guitar people are generally minimum wage earning kids that don't know shiat about how to set up a guitar so their quality is generally pretty shiatty. That's why.

But do go buy it in person, after you've had a chance to handle it.

If your town doesnt have an independant guitar store run by people in mad crazy love with the instrument. Move.

As someone who manages an independent guitar store, I'm getting an (appreciative) kick...


I raise my glass to you Charlie Freak! I've taken to building my own electrics these days and I patronize the independent stores for my parts.
 
2012-01-12 04:17:52 PM

Rent Party: Because you're a moron if you buy a guitar that you haven't physically handled.


I disagree, and every guitar I've bought on ebay has made me very happy. I'm very selective, ask for lots of pics, and ask questions. If the seller isn't a player i.e. is one of those "I changed my life with an ebay store" assholes, I move on. You can usually tell by viewing the sellers other items.

If the seller demonstrates a knowledge of the instrument, especially the small time collector who might be thinning the herd to buy that vintage ES 335 or Rick or whatever, then it's a go.

Also, never "buy it now". If you win a fair auction, you can be pretty sure that the most you'll lose is the bid spread if you want to re list it. If you "buy it now" you have no idea what's the most someone else would have paid for it. I've actually made money on a couple late 80's Ibby's that I played with, then sold to try something different.

I like the indy stores too, but I always feel bad if I don't buy anything there, their markup has to pay for their storefront, and their selection is limited.
 
2012-01-12 05:12:44 PM

H31N0US:
I like the indy stores too, but I always feel bad if I don't buy anything there, their markup has to pay for their storefront, and their selection is limited.


Our markup actually isn't too bad - we know we have to compete with the big boxes/internet dealers, so we try to stay very competitive. You won't find a single guitar or amp in my store at a price higher than the average online dealer.

It's true selection can be an issue. A few major manufacturers are very prohibitive in their stocking requirements (i.e. they make you carry way too much inventory, regardless of your market). It seems they'd much rather flood the market with cheap crap in the big stores than work with people who respect the craft and have experience with it. Remember that next time you're shopping on price alone - in the long run, that game is bad for everyone involved.
 
2012-01-12 05:51:01 PM

Charlie Freak:
It's true selection can be an issue. A few major manufacturers are very prohibitive in their stocking requirements (i.e. they make you carry way too much inventory, regardless of your market). It seems they'd much rather flood the market with cheap crap in the big stores than work with people who respect the craft and have experience with it. Remember that next time you're shopping on price alone - in the long run, that game is bad for everyone involved.


To me this is a huge benefit of the little stores. They are almost forced to go find low volume boutique stuff just to keep competitive. You mean you don't have 700 Fender Hotrod's on the shelf, or seventy of the latest Line 6 transistorized abortions? You won't have to color me disappointed. But what the hell is that thing over there that has more tubes in it than my kid's ears? I want that.
 
2012-01-12 06:06:14 PM

Charlie Freak: H31N0US:
I like the indy stores too, but I always feel bad if I don't buy anything there, their markup has to pay for their storefront, and their selection is limited.

Our markup actually isn't too bad - we know we have to compete with the big boxes/internet dealers, so we try to stay very competitive. You won't find a single guitar or amp in my store at a price higher than the average online dealer.

It's true selection can be an issue. A few major manufacturers are very prohibitive in their stocking requirements (i.e. they make you carry way too much inventory, regardless of your market). It seems they'd much rather flood the market with cheap crap in the big stores than work with people who respect the craft and have experience with it. Remember that next time you're shopping on price alone - in the long run, that game is bad for everyone involved.


Yeah I was talking with a small local in north jersey and Gibson wanted like a half million just to hang a sign out front. As a consequence though, I see these guys stocking the wall with new inventory from some weird name nobody ever heard of, made in Korea or Indo or China.

fark that. Show me the used gear. I like the idea of a used guitar trader that buys the best, tunes it up and sells it back (Ibanezrules type stuff).

If your store is in NYC let me know. I can mosey over during lunch when the weather gets better.
 
2012-01-12 07:00:44 PM

El Freak:

Dick Dale and Link Wray were NEVER "hugely popular". Dick Dale did 3 or 4 albums in the 60s and was almost unknown outside of California except by other bands. Link Wray had one real hit and a bunch of singles on indie labels. They were obscure to most people who weren't guitar geeks.

Who the hell cares how people find the stuff, as long as they find it? Well, I mean other than hipster dorks like yourself who desperately want to cling to the notion that you're somehow "special" and smarter than everyone else because of your consumer purchases?


Fark off you cultural parasite. It takes even less now to find new music than it did when I was digging around - and it took very little then. Just start flipping through a pile of old records, buy a few, and play them. Now you can click through youtube and hear stuff that was impossible to find even ten years ago. It's all out there, and it always has been. Sitting back and letting some director choose what music you listen to is as lazy and idiotic as letting a clear channel programmer decide what you're putting in your ears. Get off your ass and experiment. Learn a little. Or keep listening to the farking beatles over and over. I don't care.

Also, if you think Dick Dale and Link Wray were unknown before Tarantino found them, you're either a total idiot or you're 15 years old.
 
2012-01-12 07:38:19 PM

H31N0US: Charlie Freak: H31N0US:
I like the indy stores too, but I always feel bad if I don't buy anything there, their markup has to pay for their storefront, and their selection is limited.

Our markup actually isn't too bad - we know we have to compete with the big boxes/internet dealers, so we try to stay very competitive. You won't find a single guitar or amp in my store at a price higher than the average online dealer.

It's true selection can be an issue. A few major manufacturers are very prohibitive in their stocking requirements (i.e. they make you carry way too much inventory, regardless of your market). It seems they'd much rather flood the market with cheap crap in the big stores than work with people who respect the craft and have experience with it. Remember that next time you're shopping on price alone - in the long run, that game is bad for everyone involved.

Yeah I was talking with a small local in north jersey and Gibson wanted like a half million just to hang a sign out front. As a consequence though, I see these guys stocking the wall with new inventory from some weird name nobody ever heard of, made in Korea or Indo or China.

fark that. Show me the used gear. I like the idea of a used guitar trader that buys the best, tunes it up and sells it back (Ibanezrules type stuff).

If your store is in NYC let me know. I can mosey over during lunch when the weather gets better.


Hah, that would be awesome, but where I am the weather won't get better for about 3 months.

It's funny to note, though, how fractured the customer base is. Right here in this thread there are traditionalists, big-boxers, boutiquers, ebayers, and used-store junkies. There's nothing wrong with any of those, but just pointing out how ridiculously fragmented the market is and makes me wonder how any store can stay on these days.

/we're doing well, but, as with any store, it's nothing like "the old days"
 
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