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(Detroit Free Press)   Parents are breaking the age rule to sign their kids up to Facebook. What could possibly go wrong?   (freep.com) divider line 171
    More: Interesting, age of majority, marketing executives, adolescence, academic journal, communication studies, Facebook, Kira Kurka  
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14561 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jan 2012 at 12:39 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-08 10:12:46 AM
I think I found a pic of submitty:

clarksvillewtf.com
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-01-08 10:24:17 AM
Unintended consequences. Reminds me of the time Flickr banned Germans from looking at NSFW photos because Yahoo's age verification did not meet German standards. The "for the children" law mainly affected adults.
 
2012-01-08 11:13:31 AM
Kids will use facebook. The trick it to just pay attention to what they're doing. We have a 10 yr old that uses facebook, but the computer is in the kitchen so that we can see who she's posting with. It's all just people in the family - cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc.
 
2012-01-08 11:21:59 AM
So, a woman who's job involves explaining how to use Facebook properly has just given a newspaper interview in which she freely admits to violating their Terms of Service.

This is sure to end well for her.
 
2012-01-08 11:43:42 AM

DammitIForgotMyLogin: So, a woman who's job involves explaining how to use Facebook properly has just given a newspaper interview in which she freely admits to violating their Terms of Service.

This is sure to end well for her.


Or it could turn into a PR nightmare for Facebook, depending on how asshatty they act.
 
2012-01-08 11:51:39 AM

CrispFlows: DammitIForgotMyLogin: So, a woman who's job involves explaining how to use Facebook properly has just given a newspaper interview in which she freely admits to violating their Terms of Service.

This is sure to end well for her.

Or it could turn into a PR nightmare for Facebook, depending on how asshatty they act.


"She knowingly broke our terms of service in a way which could have opened us up to federal prosecution. So we cancelled her account"

Hard to see how she'd spin that.
 
2012-01-08 12:08:56 PM
It's common. My godson's 11 and his account is linked only to family or friends. His parents and I are constantly checking out what he does (what an 11 year old says to be cool can be hilarious! He listed his job as "Canadian Cavalry") and even deleting quotes and blocking sites. Allowing a kid computer access with supervision is important to their learning skills and computer literacy. Facebook is a big part of that learning curve, so just be a parent and watch the kids.
 
2012-01-08 12:19:41 PM

olddeegee: and his account is linked only to family or friends.


Wait, isn't this the point of Facebook?
 
2012-01-08 12:40:41 PM

ZAZ: Unintended consequences. Reminds me of the time Flickr banned Germans from looking at NSFW photos because Yahoo's age verification did not meet German standards. The "for the children" law mainly affected adults.


Facebook profile...

upload.wikimedia.org
Location: Attic
 
2012-01-08 12:45:09 PM
On the plus side, Truth or Dare has pretty much died...
 
2012-01-08 12:46:21 PM
FTFA:

"I know the importance of Facebook."

wow
 
2012-01-08 12:46:21 PM
It's not the internet's fault. It's the fault of lousy or even indifferent parenting
 
2012-01-08 12:46:50 PM
I feel sorry for kids today. When I was growing up, most parents didn't know a thing about computers or the internet (at least, mine certainly didn't). I had total free reign and they never even thought to question it.
 
2012-01-08 12:46:57 PM
If I had an eleven year old I would make sure that all of their internet activity was monitored, especially facebook. But, the most important rule for having a facebook account would be no duckface pictures.
 
2012-01-08 12:49:18 PM
"Compared to some of the other things out there, it's fairly innocent. The adult stuff is supposedly blocked," she said. "I know the importance of Facebook."


Oh yeah, its SO important. What will snowflake do without a mindless page of babbling and lies to impress her friends with... friends she's never met...? Where would she post her "I'm not 10, I'm 17" lingerie pics in order to pick up guys?

Good mommy....teach her whats really important....
 
2012-01-08 12:50:52 PM

CrispFlows: I think I found a pic of submitty:

[clarksvillewtf.com image 580x480]


Somebody is:

encrypted-tbn1.google.com
 
2012-01-08 12:51:07 PM

TheOther: ZAZ: Unintended consequences. Reminds me of the time Flickr banned Germans from looking at NSFW photos because Yahoo's age verification did not meet German standards. The "for the children" law mainly affected adults.

Facebook profile...

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x254]
Location: Attic


What's Helen Keller have to do with this?
 
2012-01-08 12:52:09 PM
From the article: "As a result of COPPA, website operators must obtain affirmative consent from parents before children under 13 can create an account."

These parents may be violating facebook policy, but if they are deliberately helping their children create accounts, it is still in agreement with the spirit of this law.

Why doesn't facebook just open up to children under 13 as long as they have parental consent? The law allows it.
 
2012-01-08 12:53:26 PM

DammitIForgotMyLogin: So, a woman who's job involves explaining how to use Facebook properly has just given a newspaper interview in which she freely admits to violating their Terms of Service.

This is sure to end well for her.


Two of my nephews (aged 5 and 10) are on the site. I refuse to add them. I actually had to explain why to my mom and sister.
 
2012-01-08 12:55:49 PM
I think it would be hilarious if (not with my kid) someone installed that spy software that tracks everything you do on the computer, let their kid have a facebook for a couple months, and then went back and searched through it.

God knows your kid would never trust you again, but still. If kids are so keen to grow up so fast these days, maybe we should make them help pay bills, do maintenance on the house/car/, balance a budget, etc. I bet they'd think twice. I'd sure as hell pick going back to not being responsible for anything over being an adult any day.
 
2012-01-08 12:56:26 PM

cs30109: I feel sorry for kids today. When I was growing up, most parents didn't know a thing about computers or the internet (at least, mine certainly didn't). I had total free reign and they never even thought to question it.


Except when it broke, at which point dad would blame you for going on "bad" sites (read: dad going on porn sites, downloading trojans, viruses, and bloatware, then blaming the kid).
 
2012-01-08 12:56:27 PM
"It's very difficult to stop something like this when all of her friends are on it," Gerstein said, noting that her daughter and her daughter's friends all have computers. "There's only so much you can do."

Turn in your parenting card, you've failed.

/If all her friends were jumping off of cliffs, you'd allow that too
//you worthless whore
 
2012-01-08 12:57:46 PM
wtfoodge.com
 
2012-01-08 12:57:54 PM

olddeegee: It's common. My godson's 11 and his account is linked only to family or friends. His parents and I are constantly checking out what he does (what an 11 year old says to be cool can be hilarious! He listed his job as "Canadian Cavalry") and even deleting quotes and blocking sites. Allowing a kid computer access with supervision is important to their learning skills and computer literacy. Facebook is a big part of that learning curve, so just be a parent and watch the kids.



I'll agree with that, and it's what I do with my 14-year-old. But I also think there's something to be said for, "so just be a parent and tell your kids 'no' -- even if 'everyone else is doing it' -- and that they're too young."
 
2012-01-08 12:58:22 PM
I think I learned the harsh realities of an unfeeling internet when I was 14 myself, thanks to the Red Dragon Inn in the AOL chatrooms.

Heaven knows what sort of internet credibility damage I could have done to myself if I had Facebook at that age.
 
2012-01-08 12:58:44 PM

skinink: TheOther: ZAZ: Unintended consequences. Reminds me of the time Flickr banned Germans from looking at NSFW photos because Yahoo's age verification did not meet German standards. The "for the children" law mainly affected adults.

Facebook profile...

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x254]
Location: Attic

What's Helen Keller have to do with this?


She wasn't even German, she was Australian.
 
2012-01-08 12:59:06 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2012-01-08 12:59:35 PM

CPT Ethanolic: Kids will use facebook. The trick it to just pay attention to what they're doing. We have a 10 yr old that uses facebook, but the computer is in the kitchen so that we can see who she's posting with. It's all just people in the family - cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc.


How refreshing. I shudder to think of those parents who let young children have free and unmonintored access to the internet. There is, as everyone knows, enough on there to traumatize one for life. That, in my opinion, would amount to serious neglect.
 
2012-01-08 01:00:53 PM

tukatz: "Compared to some of the other things out there, it's fairly innocent. The adult stuff is supposedly blocked," she said. "I know the importance of Facebook."


Oh yeah, its SO important. What will snowflake do without a mindless page of babbling and lies to impress her friends with... friends she's never met...? Where would she post her "I'm not 10, I'm 17" lingerie pics in order to pick up guys?

Good mommy....teach her whats really important....


I'm sorry, but ignoring the importance of facebook in this day and age is like ignoring email in 2000. It's not that it's just starting and could be big, most people already use it and to a lot of people it really is important.
 
2012-01-08 01:01:28 PM
 
2012-01-08 01:02:36 PM

The Blind Fury: DammitIForgotMyLogin: So, a woman who's job involves explaining how to use Facebook properly has just given a newspaper interview in which she freely admits to violating their Terms of Service.

This is sure to end well for her.

Two of my nephews (aged 5 and 10) are on the site. I refuse to add them. I actually had to explain why to my mom and sister.


Oh god, there's nothing more awkward than the "WHY YOU NO ADD ME ON FACEBOOK" conversation. Though the "why are you not adding my children on facebook" conversation is a lot easier. I'd just tell them that any grown adult that would add a child as a "friend" on facebook must be a pedophile, then watch them freak out.
 
2012-01-08 01:02:57 PM

PsiChi: CPT Ethanolic: Kids will use facebook. The trick it to just pay attention to what they're doing. We have a 10 yr old that uses facebook, but the computer is in the kitchen so that we can see who she's posting with. It's all just people in the family - cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc.

How refreshing. I shudder to think of those parents who let young children have free and unmonintored access to the internet. There is, as everyone knows, enough on there to traumatize one for life. That, in my opinion, would amount to serious neglect.


Try not to cover the mouth and nose while you're wrapping your child/ren in bubble wrap.
 
2012-01-08 01:03:39 PM

skinink: TheOther: ZAZ: Unintended consequences. Reminds me of the time Flickr banned Germans from looking at NSFW photos because Yahoo's age verification did not meet German standards. The "for the children" law mainly affected adults.

Facebook profile...

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x254]
Location: Attic

What's Helen Keller have to do with this?



That's Amelia Earhart.
 
2012-01-08 01:03:51 PM
My 11-yr old has tried to con me, her father, and even her favorite uncle into allowing her a Facebook account. The answer has consistently been a big fat "NO." She'll live. I don't give a flying fark how many of her friends are on it, and have been since they were 9. I DO know how cruel kids can be, and I neither want her to get bullied nor her to be a bully. Yes, she would be monitored, but I still don't even want there to be a minute possibility.

No Facebook. Not yours.
 
2012-01-08 01:05:43 PM

Sarah Palin's Conscience: cs30109: I feel sorry for kids today. When I was growing up, most parents didn't know a thing about computers or the internet (at least, mine certainly didn't). I had total free reign and they never even thought to question it.

Except when it broke, at which point dad would blame you for going on "bad" sites (read: dad going on porn sites, downloading trojans, viruses, and bloatware, then blaming the kid).


Yup.

Mom downloaded every AOL attachment she got. When Google took a full minute to load (added on to about 20 minutes to start the computer), it was because of the mp3s my brother and I had put on it. Before we left for college.

/sigh...
//we just moved the mp3s to a hidden folder and spent a full day scanning and cleaning the damn thing
 
2012-01-08 01:07:15 PM

TheOther: ZAZ: Unintended consequences. Reminds me of the time Flickr banned Germans from looking at NSFW photos because Yahoo's age verification did not meet German standards. The "for the children" law mainly affected adults.

Facebook profile...

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x254]
Location: Attic


Dude, you've just been favorited.
 
2012-01-08 01:09:05 PM
"It's very difficult to stop something like this when all of her friends are on it," Gerstein said, noting that her daughter and her daughter's friends all have computers. "There's only so much you can do."

So, I'm not a parent or anything, but maybe take away her computer and ground her dumb ass for breaking the law?
 
2012-01-08 01:09:34 PM
a.abcnews.com
 
2012-01-08 01:10:57 PM
make sure kids are wearing their helmet when using the computer
 
2012-01-08 01:11:19 PM
One of the extra-curricular programs at our middle school only distributed news, schedules and announcements via Facebook. When I pointed out to them that about half of their club members had to lie to sign up for an account AND that it violated school policy, they basically went "pfffft, who cares?"

And to be fair- they're probably right. The school district has its own "social media" system, which sucks and nobody uses it, not even them. They broadcast snow days via Facebook, have most of their clubs and teams on Facebook, etc. As much as I hate Facebook, it's become so ubiquitous that it approaches the level of a public utility. It wouldn't surprise me if in a decade or so, it will be as regulated as the phone company was in the late 20th century.
 
2012-01-08 01:11:31 PM
If the kids aren't old enough to break the rules on their own then they're too young for Facebook.
 
2012-01-08 01:13:50 PM

Urinal Cake Mix: I think it would be hilarious if (not with my kid) someone installed that spy software that tracks everything you do on the computer, let their kid have a facebook for a couple months, and then went back and searched through it.


I started with an old school keystroke capture device back in the 90s. Remember AIM? Oldest sk8r kid thought I had super powers because whenever he got himself into trouble I somehow knew everything.

I love tracking software- my computer and they're minors- fair game for snooping. I only read up on their lives when I absolutely have to- otherwise I'd die from the toxic levels of stoopid. You can't imagine how meaningless and empty 99% of their comments are.

Then again, they make it easy for me by just forgetting to sign out of Facebook.
 
2012-01-08 01:14:36 PM

PsiChi: CPT Ethanolic: Kids will use facebook. The trick it to just pay attention to what they're doing. We have a 10 yr old that uses facebook, but the computer is in the kitchen so that we can see who she's posting with. It's all just people in the family - cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc.

How refreshing. I shudder to think of those parents who let young children have free and unmonintored access to the internet. There is, as everyone knows, enough on there to traumatize one for life. That, in my opinion, would amount to serious neglect.


I had free access at that age. It was sweet. Didn't cause any problems.
 
2012-01-08 01:18:35 PM

sk8r: Urinal Cake Mix: I think it would be hilarious if (not with my kid) someone installed that spy software that tracks everything you do on the computer, let their kid have a facebook for a couple months, and then went back and searched through it.

I started with an old school keystroke capture device back in the 90s. Remember AIM? Oldest sk8r kid thought I had super powers because whenever he got himself into trouble I somehow knew everything.

I love tracking software- my computer and they're minors- fair game for snooping. I only read up on their lives when I absolutely have to- otherwise I'd die from the toxic levels of stoopid. You can't imagine how meaningless and empty 99% of their comments are.

Then again, they make it easy for me by just forgetting to sign out of Facebook.


I should clarify the above post a bit. I told them that the family computer was monitered and they still put the most stupid things you can imagine up there.
 
2012-01-08 01:21:17 PM

Submitted First With a Better Headline: [i.imgur.com image 496x414]


/I wish this were on The Onion instead of being true
 
2012-01-08 01:23:46 PM

haywatchthis: make sure kids are wearing their helmet when using the computer


t1.gstatic.com
 
2012-01-08 01:24:21 PM
You know all those cases of cyberbulliying? Yeah, this is why.rewardslink.info
 
2012-01-08 01:25:19 PM

SpiderZia: My 11-yr old has tried to con me, her father, and even her favorite uncle into allowing her a Facebook account. The answer has consistently been a big fat "NO." She'll live. I don't give a flying fark how many of her friends are on it, and have been since they were 9. I DO know how cruel kids can be, and I neither want her to get bullied nor her to be a bully. Yes, she would be monitored, but I still don't even want there to be a minute possibility.

No Facebook. Not yours.


You are an awesome parent. Honestly.
 
2012-01-08 01:26:03 PM
What is all this social media stuff people keep yapping about? I'm off to water my rock.
 
2012-01-08 01:26:40 PM

cs30109: I had free access at that age. It was sweet. Didn't cause any problems.


If "loving boobies" is a problem,

i830.photobucket.com
 
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