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(Sun Sentinel)   Apparently, someone thinks we need nutrition labels on alcohol   (sun-sentinel.com ) divider line
    More: Stupid, nutrition facts label, tobacco taxes, Consumer Federation of America, nutritionists, chain stores  
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7011 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jan 2012 at 12:01 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-01-03 02:38:13 PM  

cptjeff: MrEricSir: bigdanc: I'd say you're twixt 180 and 200 cals there. A shot of tequila is about 90 cals

I guess you're right. Still, it doesn't seem like you can get a "hard liquor belly" the way one does with beer.

I probably got that impression because my morning commute involves stepping over men passed out on the sidewalk, surrounded by bottles of Royal Gate vodka. Those people just aren't fat.

That's because different forms of calories are processed in different ways. Barely any of the calories in hard liquor, (about 5% according to the googles) can be broken down into usable fuel for your body. It's broken down by your liver and pissed out as waste. With beer, on the other hand, you're picking up the residual carbs and sugars that distilled liquor doesn't have.

Also, that's probably why the FDA currently bans such labels. They don't want people getting the impression that calories from alcohol will do jack shiat for them. Because generally, they won't. A real martini (as in gin, vermouth, olive, no syrups, juices or whatever other crap), though containing around 250 calories, will have the approximate impact on your gut of an olive. Because that's the only thing in there your body can really break down as fuel.

Basically, alcohol gets turned into one substance by the liver, which is released into the bloodstream, and has priority in metabolizing. So if you drink a bunch, you won't burn other fuels like fat, protein or carbs very well. You'll still burn them, your body does still need to move, but not at all that high a rate. You're suppressing fat burning, which can be an issue in packing on the pounds, but you're not adding anything significant with a glass of your favorite tipple.


Thats what i always figured, calories are simply a unit of measurement for potential energy, a lump of charcoal has a lot of calories, but that doesnt mean theyre usable by the human body.
 
2012-01-03 03:21:27 PM  

JackieRabbit: And alcohol itself has no nutritional value. Beer and, to a lesser extent, wine can make you gain weight, but not because of the alcohol. Alcohol has calories, but it burned off and doesn't go into the glycogen cycle to be stored as fat. So distilled spirits do not of themselves make a person gain weight. However, alcohol does cause foods eaten to be more readily converted to fat. So eating like a pig and then going out to booze it up is not a good idea. Alcoholics tend to eat less than non-drinkers and heavy drinkers impacts absorption of nutrients from the gut. This is why severe alcoholics are usually very thin.


and i've found my new year's diet plan...
 
2012-01-03 04:56:06 PM  

make me some tea: I would actually like to know how many calories and grams of fat are in a shot of Bailey's. Not that I drink much of it, but still.


94 calories and 5.8g fat in 1.3 oz
http://calorie count.about.com/calories-baileys-irish-cream-i61
 
2012-01-03 11:28:09 PM  

RobSeace: Snarfangel: Seriously, though, I'm okay with nutrition labels on everything that can be consumed (though it would be a waste for bottled water).

Not necessarily... Some of that bottled "water" apparently contains more than just H2O... Bored, waiting in line at a movie theater once, I actually read the ingredients on the bottle of water I just paid an exorbitant amount for at the concession stand; one of the ingredients listed was salt! Well, no, actually it listed "sodium chloride", presumably in a clever attempt at tricking the average consumer who wouldn't realize that was actually table salt... But, seriously, what kind of assholes deliberately add salt to their bottled water?! It's not like it was some pure spring water and the salt was from natural mineral traces or something; this was the "filtered tapwater" kind of bottled water, and they had actually deliberately added the damn salt to it!

/Dasani, I believe it was...


Pure water is actually a little bitter, and salt is a bitter blocker. They add it to make the water taste better.
 
2012-01-04 02:32:52 AM  
Myth Number 1: Guinness is heavy in calories ... FalseGuinness weighs in at 125 calories per 12-oz. serving. But wait, who drinks a 12-oz. Guinness? Nobody, since a pint is 16 oz. (20 for the lucky stiffs in the motherland). Do the math and you get about 170 calories per 16-oz. serving. Guess how many are in a 16-oz. Strawberry Surf Rider smoothie from Jamba Juice? 330. Thank us later, ladies.

Myth Number 2: Guinness is supposed to be warm ... FalseGuinness reports its draught is best stored at 42.8 degrees. Your average fridge is between 35 and 38, which is a bit on the chilly side. Unfortunately, most beer coolers in bars are even colder to accommodate our thirst for "ice cold" beer. Regardless, 43 degrees is neither warm nor room temperature. The obvious solution is to order two at a time, so one is always warming up!

Myth Number 3: 'Guinness for strength' ... UndeterminedThe famous 'Guinness is good for you' and similar advertisements from the 1930s -- great marketing ploy, but just keep in mind it came about in the 1930s, when you could still claim your product did anything and not get in trouble with the law. We happen to think a pint of Guinness is the most important meal of the day, but we have no scientific evidence to back that up. Your mileage may vary. If Guinness does give you a boost, it's probably more in the "liquid courage" category.

Myth Number 4: The flavor of Guinness stems from nefarious sources ... False
The more outrageous stories about Guinness include the ones about how dead rats were found at the bottom of the vats in the St James's Gate brewery in Ireland, thus explaining the unique taste of stout. Other stories have circulated that Guinness is actually filtered through lamb's blood to get its taste. This one is classic barroom BS at its finest. Guinness has been the victim of more Snopes-worthy urban legends than any other libation, except maybe Corona. The basics of Guinness are barley, hops, yeast and water ... from the Skull and Bones Society. Guinness derives its toasted flavor, which tastes anywhere from coffee to chocolate, and bitter hint from the manner in which its malted barley is roasted and the amount of hops used. The creamy taste of the head is a result of nitrogen bubbles released during the pouring process.

Myth Number 5: The St. James's Gate brewery produces different kinds of Guinness for various markets ... Kinda
Guinness is available in 100 countries and is brewed in nearly 50 of them, using locally sourced ingredients like water. Therefore, one could argue (and we know you will) that any Guinness brewed outside Dublin is materially different. The top five selling markets? (In order) Great Britain, Ireland, Nigeria, the U.S. and Cameroon. We were surprised by those two, too.

Myth Number 6: Water from the River Liffey in Dublin goes into Guinness ... False
While the St. James's Gate brewery sits next to the river, the water used to make Guinness comes from the Wicklow mountains to the south.

Myth Number 7: Guinness in a can is different from draught Guinness ... Confusing
Guinness is available in draught, Extra Stout, and Foreign Extra. Draught comes in cans, bottles and, well, draught. Extra Stout comes only in bottles and Foreign Extra comes in bottles, cans and an Extra Smooth variety. Got all that? Good.

Myth Number 8: Strict vegetarians can't drink Guinness ... True
The production of the stout involves the use of isinglass, a byproduct of the fishing industry derived from dead fish. Isinglass is used as a fining agent for settling out suspended matter in the beer vat, and while it's kept at the bottom of the tank, some isinglass may end up in the final product. So if you're the type who avoids gelatin and whey in your diet, you're out of luck. We can only imagine the histrionics this revelation might spark from PETA.

Myth Number 9: Guinness is black ... False
Look closer and you'll see that Guinness actually has a ruby red color, due to how the malted barley is roasted. Hint: This one is an easy way to win $5 from your friends.

Myth Number 10: The Guinness in Ireland is much better than the Guinness served in the United States ... Up to you
While we would never judge a fellow tippler for his esteemed critique of the palate (especially after 2-for-1 atomic-wing night), this granddaddy of Guinness myths is usually spouted from the condescending lips of a recently returned study-abroad student, suddenly eminently more cultured than we are for spending three months puking outside the American-themed bar in some foreign city. Whether a pint is better in the Old Sod than it is here really has to do with a lot of factors -- mainly, how many you've had.
 
2012-01-04 03:39:54 AM  
Exactly how the fark is this stupid? If you support nutrition labels on anything else, why wouldn't you support them on alcohol?

You know what, I'll come out with this new alcoholic drink where I sneak in 1000 calories. It's perfectly legal right now, and it's not that hard to do with stuff like bulking powder or sugars that we digest but don't taste sweet.

And we wonder why America is so dadblasted fat.
 
2012-01-04 04:34:49 AM  

trlkly: You know what, I'll come out with this new alcoholic drink where I sneak in 1000 calories. It's perfectly legal right now, and it's not that hard to do with stuff like bulking powder or sugars that we digest but don't taste sweet.


Pretty sure the ATF would be all over your ass for that sort of thing. They may not have to list nutritional information, but to an extent, what goes into spirits is tightly regulated.
 
2012-01-04 06:24:05 AM  

RogermcAllen: RobSeace: Snarfangel: Seriously, though, I'm okay with nutrition labels on everything that can be consumed (though it would be a waste for bottled water).

Not necessarily... Some of that bottled "water" apparently contains more than just H2O... Bored, waiting in line at a movie theater once, I actually read the ingredients on the bottle of water I just paid an exorbitant amount for at the concession stand; one of the ingredients listed was salt! Well, no, actually it listed "sodium chloride", presumably in a clever attempt at tricking the average consumer who wouldn't realize that was actually table salt... But, seriously, what kind of assholes deliberately add salt to their bottled water?! It's not like it was some pure spring water and the salt was from natural mineral traces or something; this was the "filtered tapwater" kind of bottled water, and they had actually deliberately added the damn salt to it!

/Dasani, I believe it was...

Pure water is actually a little bitter, and salt is a bitter blocker. They add it to make the water taste better.


Uh, every discussion of pure H2O I've ever witnessed has described it as (among other properties) "tasteless"... What is your citation for this supposed "bitter" flavor of pure water?
 
2012-01-04 11:18:12 PM  

ktybear: [images.watoday.com.au image 420x304]Typical label in Australia


It has all the important information right there:
750ml total volume
11.6% ABV
7 servings
No fat chicks
 
2012-01-04 11:33:31 PM  

pizen: ktybear: [images.watoday.com.au image 420x304]Typical label in Australia

It has all the important information right there:
750ml total volume
11.6% ABV
7 servings
No fat chicks


The servings part is what I like the most but it all depends what they consider a serving.
 
2012-01-05 12:18:06 AM  

A Terrible Human: The servings part is what I like the most but it all depends what they consider a serving.


We have this to explain serving size, and this

makes it pretty darn easy to calculate how much you've had to drink
 
2012-01-05 12:35:11 AM  
So is that liquor in a shot glass or a bigger glass?
 
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