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(io9)   NASA has discovered the tiniest, most pathetic black hole in the universe   (io9.com) divider line 29
    More: Spiffy, black holes, universe, NASA, solar masses, binary systems, metallicity, upper limit, single star  
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6266 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Dec 2011 at 7:00 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2011-12-18 01:32:45 PM  
This 'pathetic' black hole would eat you, your family, and everyone you love or care about.
 
2011-12-18 02:27:52 PM  

Sgygus: This 'pathetic' black hole would eat you, your family, and everyone you love or care about.


Also, this entire star system.
 
2011-12-18 02:52:11 PM  
After all, a black hole can always get bigger, but we're running out of room for black holes to get any smaller.

There's plenty of room for black holes to get smaller. You're just thinking in too narrow a time span.
 
2011-12-18 06:14:00 PM  
americancapitalists.squarespace.com
 
2011-12-18 07:05:18 PM  
This black hole is so pathetic, it drives a ZR1.
 
2011-12-18 07:15:45 PM  
It looks just like your mom.
 
2011-12-18 07:21:09 PM  

Daddy's Big Pink Man-Squirrel: [americancapitalists.squarespace.com image 75x114]


I would have gone for "Michele Bachmann's intellect" or "Newt Gringrich's conscience". Cain's old hat.
 
2011-12-18 07:23:05 PM  
Gary Coleman?

/DRTFA
 
2011-12-18 07:26:57 PM  

TheOmni: After all, a black hole can always get bigger, but we're running out of room for black holes to get any smaller.

There's plenty of room for black holes to get smaller. You're just thinking in too narrow a time span.


This. Black holes are constantly evaporating away.
 
2011-12-18 07:30:14 PM  

Hollie Maea: TheOmni: After all, a black hole can always get bigger, but we're running out of room for black holes to get any smaller.

There's plenty of room for black holes to get smaller. You're just thinking in too narrow a time span.

This. Black holes are constantly evaporating away.


Yeah, only in a mere 10^66 years.
 
2011-12-18 07:43:14 PM  

that bosnian sniper: Daddy's Big Pink Man-Squirrel: [americancapitalists.squarespace.com image 75x114]

I would have gone for "Michele Bachmann's intellect" or "Newt Gringrich's conscience". Cain's old hat.


www.reiss.dk
 
2011-12-18 07:51:47 PM  

Daddy's Big Pink Man-Squirrel: [americancapitalists.squarespace.com image 75x114]


Sorry, you misunderstand. Black hole, not black A-hole.
 
2011-12-18 07:52:55 PM  
That black hole sucks.
 
2011-12-18 08:10:39 PM  

Hollie Maea: TheOmni: After all, a black hole can always get bigger, but we're running out of room for black holes to get any smaller.

There's plenty of room for black holes to get smaller. You're just thinking in too narrow a time span.

This. Black holes are constantly evaporating away.


OK, serious question here - please correct my armchair assumptions: A black hole is an object of such incredible mass that it can bend space and time around it, and light that enters the event horizon cannot even escape despite its great velocity. So, a black hole is a huge amount of mass. Black holes evaporate through opposing jets of neutrinos, which have mass, albeit very small. If those jets come from within the black hole, they must be traveling faster than the speed of light, because they can escape but light cannot. This should be impossible. Alternatively, the jets are just nearby material energized by the black hole but have not fallen into the event horizon, meaning they can escape. If the black hole contains the mass... where does the mass go when the black hole evaporates?

\I make drunken scientific laymen look like scholarly geniuses, that's why I am asking.
 
2011-12-18 08:14:16 PM  

somemoron: Hollie Maea: TheOmni: After all, a black hole can always get bigger, but we're running out of room for black holes to get any smaller.

There's plenty of room for black holes to get smaller. You're just thinking in too narrow a time span.

This. Black holes are constantly evaporating away.

OK, serious question here - please correct my armchair assumptions: A black hole is an object of such incredible mass that it can bend space and time around it, and light that enters the event horizon cannot even escape despite its great velocity. So, a black hole is a huge amount of mass. Black holes evaporate through opposing jets of neutrinos, which have mass, albeit very small. If those jets come from within the black hole, they must be traveling faster than the speed of light, because they can escape but light cannot. This should be impossible. Alternatively, the jets are just nearby material energized by the black hole but have not fallen into the event horizon, meaning they can escape. If the black hole contains the mass... where does the mass go when the black hole evaporates?

\I make drunken scientific laymen look like scholarly geniuses, that's why I am asking.


the jets are from matter being superheated when it get near the hole, thats not what the mass is coming from, it's from hawking radiotion:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation
 
2011-12-18 08:21:26 PM  
Shut up, it was just in the pool.
 
2011-12-18 08:35:30 PM  
Sounds like my mom.
 
2011-12-18 08:40:01 PM  
albuquerquehalsey: somemoron: Hollie Maea: TheOmni: After all, a black hole can always get bigger, but we're running out of room for black holes to get any smaller.

There's plenty of room for black holes to get smaller. You're just thinking in too narrow a time span.

This. Black holes are constantly evaporating away.

OK, serious question here - please correct my armchair assumptions: A black hole is an object of such incredible mass that it can bend space and time around it, and light that enters the event horizon cannot even escape despite its great velocity. So, a black hole is a huge amount of mass. Black holes evaporate through opposing jets of neutrinos, which have mass, albeit very small. If those jets come from within the black hole, they must be traveling faster than the speed of light, because they can escape but light cannot. This should be impossible. Alternatively, the jets are just nearby material energized by the black hole but have not fallen into the event horizon, meaning they can escape. If the black hole contains the mass... where does the mass go when the black hole evaporates?

\I make drunken scientific laymen look like scholarly geniuses, that's why I am asking.

the jets are from matter being superheated when it get near the hole, thats not what the mass is coming from, it's from hawking radiotion:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation


This.

Anti-particle entropy.
 
2011-12-18 08:42:49 PM  
Oy vey, that's a lotta math... Thanks for the link, now I gotta go think about it for a while. Physics was NEVER my strong suit.

\Since you mentioned Hawking-"x", I can't resist a Futurama reference. "I call it a Hawking-Hole."
\\Seriously, thanks.
 
2011-12-18 08:55:17 PM  

Daddy's Big Pink Man-Squirrel: [americancapitalists.squarespace.com image 75x114]


Hmm. I would have gone with Montana Fishburne.
 
2011-12-18 09:03:10 PM  
What is NASA doing looking at your mom's asshole?
 
2011-12-18 09:14:26 PM  

PizzaJedi81: Daddy's Big Pink Man-Squirrel: [americancapitalists.squarespace.com image 75x114]

Sorry, you misunderstand. Black hole, not black A-hole.


My apologies. Here:

Oops. Dammit. I mean here:

fark! I keep trying to post a picture of Newt Gingrich's heart, but every time I look at it I pass out.

And the last thing I see are these two scary lights in the darkness...
i1222.photobucket.com
 
2011-12-18 09:28:08 PM  

somemoron: Oy vey, that's a lotta math... Thanks for the link, now I gotta go think about it for a while. Physics was NEVER my strong suit.


The layman's math free "close enough" explanation: In free space, energy is constantly being converted into mass -- into a particle and antiparticle pair. These pairs exist for just a tiny amount of time until they recombine back into energy. But lets say that this pair is produced right at the event horizon of a black hole, and one of the two falls beyond the event horizon. It can never come back out, because nothing can escape the event horizon of a black hole. So now the remaining particle doesn't recombine back into energy, and it persists and goes along its way. An observer looking at the black hole would see this as a particle emitted by the event horizon of the black hole But according to conservation of mass, if a particle is emitted from the black hole, then the black hole must lose the same amount of mass. So, by sucking in a particle, the black hole loses a particle. Or something.
 
2011-12-18 09:34:00 PM  

Tarl3k: What is NASA doing looking at your mom's asshole?


They find you fascinating.
 
2011-12-18 11:17:12 PM  
The black hole was unremarkable.
 
2011-12-19 12:16:12 AM  

Hollie Maea: TheOmni: After all, a black hole can always get bigger, but we're running out of room for black holes to get any smaller.

There's plenty of room for black holes to get smaller. You're just thinking in too narrow a time span.

This. Black holes are constantly evaporating away.


I had one stored in a pickle jar in the back of the fridge one time and then someone knocked the lid off and POOF it disappeared.
 
2011-12-19 01:03:04 AM  
images2.wikia.nocookie.net

The black hole's the least of your worries!
 
2011-12-19 01:52:36 AM  
Link (new window)
 
2011-12-19 02:09:44 PM  

Hollie Maea: somemoron: Oy vey, that's a lotta math... Thanks for the link, now I gotta go think about it for a while. Physics was NEVER my strong suit.

The layman's math free "close enough" explanation: In free space, energy is constantly being converted into mass -- into a particle and antiparticle pair. These pairs exist for just a tiny amount of time until they recombine back into energy. But lets say that this pair is produced right at the event horizon of a black hole, and one of the two falls beyond the event horizon. It can never come back out, because nothing can escape the event horizon of a black hole. So now the remaining particle doesn't recombine back into energy, and it persists and goes along its way. An observer looking at the black hole would see this as a particle emitted by the event horizon of the black hole But according to conservation of mass, if a particle is emitted from the black hole, then the black hole must lose the same amount of mass. So, by sucking in a particle, the black hole loses a particle. Or something.


You already mentioned the particle pair consisted of a particle and anti-particle. The anti-particle falls into the black hole, decreasing its mass by annihilating one particle or equivalent inside the black hole.
 
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