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(NJ.com)   From "Circus Arts" and "The Harry Potter Phenomenon" to "'South Park' and Philosophy" and "Wine Insights", never before have Liberal Arts majors been so qualified to man the deep fryer   (nj.com) divider line 115
    More: Silly, South Park, New Jersey, Fairleigh Dickinson University, East Rutherford, American College of Sofia, local college, tightropes, arts  
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5160 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2011 at 3:53 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-12-11 04:56:25 PM
If I can attone for myself a bit, outside of highly specialized fields, all a degree does is prove you can learn and follow through.
 
2011-12-11 04:56:34 PM

Zippercole: Once again, Fark has deceptively ignored the difference between a college course and a college major.


Considering that the website owner hates a specific college, and himself graduated from a crappy little podunk Lutheran college, what do you expect?
 
2011-12-11 04:57:55 PM

GoldSpider: If I can attone for myself a bit, outside of highly specialized fields, all a degree does is prove you can learn and follow through.


Unless it is Women's Studies.

/Mmm, sammiches.
 
2011-12-11 05:07:36 PM
www.videodetective.com

Now, class, note that in this scene, as in many others, Bella has no lines here. What message do you think Meyers intended to communicate through her skillful use of quasi-symbolic non-dialogue?
 
2011-12-11 05:12:51 PM

BlippityBleep: astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major

your job must suck, and you obviously have less than zero clue about other professions.


Wow, defensive much? Splurge on a sarcasm detector for yourself this Festivus season.
 
2011-12-11 05:13:19 PM

DaShredda: BlippityBleep: astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major

your job must suck, and you obviously have less than zero clue about other professions.

I thought he was being sarcastic.


erg, my meter is all screwy today. stupid sarcasm meter, wurk better!

/apologies
 
2011-12-11 05:13:55 PM

Son of Thunder: I'm a college professor, so I'm... actually, I have too many papers to grade to be getting a kick out of much at this time of the semester.

Though the topics may be unusual, the freshman seminars are designed to teach time management, college-level writing and other key skills.

Good. My courses tend to have the standard textbook/lecture/exams/paper format, and the thing that is killing most of the students who don't do well in my classes is things like time management and college-level writing skills. I'd rather have a student spend a semester playing acrobat if that course is structured in a way that teaches them skills that will help them do well in my more-traditional courses.

And if the students are actually learning actual philosophy when they take "South Park and Philosophy," or actual sociology when they take "Sociology of Salsa," then I have no problem with presenting legitimate scholarly work in an original format. Heck, if it'd get basic principles of psychological theories and research into my students heads, I'd be happy to change one of my Intro Psych courses to "Psychology of Fark.com".


Hello, fellow prof. I am a prof of English in Tennessee. The students I teach seem to have the same qualities as yours. Mine come in unable to do research or think through a research paper. They cannot take a list of questions about a text and answer them in paragraph form. If these skills can be taught in an innovative way that allows the student to apply the skills learned in other courses, then I agree with the curriculum choices. However, I think that the sociology class and the philosophy class described are too narrowly focused to be effective. Just focusing on South Park or on Salsa Dancing does not encourage cross-curriculum engagement. God. . .did I just say that??? I need a beer.
 
2011-12-11 05:21:53 PM
I took a class on Casino management. I dont even like gambling. But it gets you to think about odds, see through false information and deceptive choices, and how to recognize patterns.

Yeah, i cant see how that kind of skill set is of ANY use.
 
2011-12-11 05:39:08 PM

Oznog: Now, class, note that in this scene, as in many others, Bella has no lines here. What message do you think Meyers intended to communicate through her skillful use of quasi-symbolic non-dialogue?


"I wanna put it in her pooper"
 
2011-12-11 05:41:49 PM

DaShredda: Calehedron: You just described my life.

Fo rizzle?

What do you do?


I am a maintenance technician at one of the largest semi conductor companies in da world. Between the 12hr shifts, 40min commute each way (with 3 carpoolers... I try to be greenish), and getting ready in the morning, I have 1-2 hrs left in each day outside sleeping. I dont have time for art on those days. Luckily its only 3/4 days a week and I enjoy my time off catching up on everything I havent done the first half of the week.

I also got all my electro-mechanical training in the Army in 1987-88. AC and DC were 40 hour classes, one week. Test out and move on. Semis may have been 2 weeks. No time for fancy stuff.
 
2011-12-11 05:42:04 PM

LemSkroob: I took a class on Casino management. I dont even like gambling. But it gets you to think about odds, see through false information and deceptive choices, and how to recognize patterns.

Yeah, i cant see how that kind of skill set is of ANY use.


"Casino Management" ? I would actually be interested in taking a course like that, even though I work in IT.

But that might just be me watching too many "Las Vegas" reruns
 
2011-12-11 05:44:45 PM
Academics in humanities are generally less prone to erroneous beliefs than are engineers or other applied-scientists.
 
2011-12-11 05:49:39 PM

James F. Campbell: Academics in humanities are generally less prone to erroneous beliefs than are engineers or other applied-scientists.


They are also less prone to money.

/academic
 
2011-12-11 05:53:25 PM

astro716: They are also less prone to money.


So are engineers. (new window)

"Salzman puts the total STEM workforce at 4.8 million. That is roughly one-third of the 15.7 million workers who hold at least one science or engineering degree. There are a lot of skilled workers who have been lured out of the not-very-well-paid STEM occupations to work in high finance and elsewhere, and he suggests that an increase in wages would bring many back into STEM activities."

In other words, people in the STEM field feel like they aren't getting paid enough to do what they were trained to do, and so foreign STEM workers are brought over because they're cheaper and will work shiattier jobs.
 
2011-12-11 06:00:37 PM
Taking a class!=degree

This message brought to you by people without mental retardation.
 
2011-12-11 06:00:51 PM

Calehedron: DaShredda: Calehedron: You just described my life.

Fo rizzle?

What do you do?

I am a maintenance technician at one of the largest semi conductor companies in da world. Between the 12hr shifts, 40min commute each way (with 3 carpoolers... I try to be greenish), and getting ready in the morning, I have 1-2 hrs left in each day outside sleeping. I dont have time for art on those days. Luckily its only 3/4 days a week and I enjoy my time off catching up on everything I havent done the first half of the week.

I also got all my electro-mechanical training in the Army in 1987-88. AC and DC were 40 hour classes, one week. Test out and move on. Semis may have been 2 weeks. No time for fancy stuff.


I feel ya.

I used to work in NYC right out of college, but I lived in Princeton.

2 hour commute to work. 8 hour day. Mandatory 1 for lunch. 2 hour commute home.

I would leave the house 6:30 AM and get home 8 PM. Time for nothing but sleep.

I have since left that job because my free time is more valuable to me than anything else.

Everyone works their butts off, builds a 401k, and then retires, realized that their 401k cannot buy youth.

I do not want to work 60 hours a week so I can buy a fancy car when I'm 65.

I want to run free in the wild, run through the woods, and be awesome. Responsibility is a trap for suckers.
 
2011-12-11 06:01:00 PM

Sabyen91: astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major

I can't wait until everybody gets a career chip. No need for thought or education. Plug the chip in and do your job, citizen.


s3.amazonaws.com
 
2011-12-11 06:20:34 PM

GoldSpider: If I can attone for myself a bit, outside of highly specialized fields, all a degree does is prove you can learn and follow through.


I'm not sure about that. My undergrad is in Biological Sciences, and I DID pick up some pretty specific job skills that I've used in just about every job I've held since. My degree tells an employer not only that I can sit through a mess of classes and write a lot of papers (which I did and I can), but that I know how to titrate, run gels, extract DNA and have a decent idea of how a plasmid works.

/useful in some places, really!
 
2011-12-11 06:29:51 PM

edmo: My BA is in Computer Science and Mathematics. You can't explain that.


That's BS!
 
2011-12-11 06:42:31 PM

taurusowner: Whether through being a cog in some bureaucratic machine or being the next "outside the box" innovator like Steve Jobs, you still need to know how to do something with your life the produces a sustainable living for you and your dependents.


yes, but you don't know what will help you do that. Take Steve Jobs for instance: the reason the original Mac had nice, interesting and different typefaces (and not just blocky Monospaced ones) is partly because when he was in between school and starting Apple, he took a course in Typography (the kind of course I think this article is talking about), and by god, look at it. Life is more then just doing what you need to do.
 
2011-12-11 06:51:37 PM

saintstryfe: taurusowner: Whether through being a cog in some bureaucratic machine or being the next "outside the box" innovator like Steve Jobs, you still need to know how to do something with your life the produces a sustainable living for you and your dependents.

yes, but you don't know what will help you do that. Take Steve Jobs for instance: the reason the original Mac had nice, interesting and different typefaces (and not just blocky Monospaced ones) is partly because when he was in between school and starting Apple, he took a course in Typography (the kind of course I think this article is talking about), and by god, look at it. Life is more then just doing what you need to do.


But life does start with doing what you need to. And unfortunately that is a fact lost on many liberal arts students. Learning about Comparative Religions of South Africa might be very interesting, but if it doesn't make you able to provide for yourself, you need a new degree. Life is not about enjoying yourself on someone else's dime.
 
2011-12-11 06:53:44 PM

taurusowner: saintstryfe: taurusowner: Whether through being a cog in some bureaucratic machine or being the next "outside the box" innovator like Steve Jobs, you still need to know how to do something with your life the produces a sustainable living for you and your dependents.

yes, but you don't know what will help you do that. Take Steve Jobs for instance: the reason the original Mac had nice, interesting and different typefaces (and not just blocky Monospaced ones) is partly because when he was in between school and starting Apple, he took a course in Typography (the kind of course I think this article is talking about), and by god, look at it. Life is more then just doing what you need to do.

But life does start with doing what you need to. And unfortunately that is a fact lost on many liberal arts students. Learning about Comparative Religions of South Africa might be very interesting, but if it doesn't make you able to provide for yourself, you need a new degree. Life is not about enjoying yourself on someone else's dime.


By that logic we might as well stop going to college because no undergrad degree in and of itself will help put food on the table.
 
2011-12-11 07:10:17 PM

Sabyen91: astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major

I can't wait until everybody gets a career chip. No need for thought or education. Plug the chip in and do your job, citizen.


I'll wait for the Mr. Stud thanks.
 
2011-12-11 07:18:26 PM
Universities are dangerous places - think of how many revolutions and protest movements have come out them. Imagine you are a government and found a way to turn universities into glorified vocational schools where the students just learn how to do a job rather than think for themselves, wouldn't you grab it with both hands?
 
2011-12-11 07:26:46 PM

GoldSpider: If I can attone for myself a bit, outside of highly specialized fields, all a degree does is prove you can learn and follow through.


Redemption is yours, my son. Go forth and prosper.

;)

Sorry, couldn't resist.

ANY class that can step in and help fill the void in current education I am all for. I started giving my kids logic puzzles and discussing television and books with them years ago, because their schools are far more interested in monkey training them to color in the appropriate dot on a standardized test than teaching them any kind of practical skill. Critical thinking, inspiration, creativity, and just plain old fashioned thinking outside the box were utterly foreign to them. They try to have meaningful discussions with their friends and are just stymied.

It makes me sad to think about where those generations are going to end up. Take the off the wall electives, get out of the pigeonhole they're stuffing you into!
 
2011-12-11 07:57:47 PM
I've come up with a degree that I think would be real popular.


Go to College to get a degree in being an Asshole. Learn from Real Assholes. Assholes who have been running Big Industry and Assholes working in Politics and every other sector making a Name for themselves!

Eventually, it would be it's own educational building: Asshole University. Team Mascot: The Gamecocks.

I think I'm on to something here, I might as well capitalize on it.



/can't wait to see how the filters handle this.
 
2011-12-11 08:06:22 PM
IT Major --- graduated in the 80's (we called it IS back then). My favorite courses: Greek and Roman History, French Literature, and Circus Arts. Being able to discuss Plato, Tartuffe, etc. is great. Juggling has been very useful and has impressed my children to no end. FORTRAN and Cobol--- haven't used them since graduation.
 
2011-12-11 08:15:11 PM

xria: Universities are dangerous places - think of how many revolutions and protest movements have come out them. Imagine you are a government and found a way to turn universities into glorified vocational schools where the students just learn how to do a job rather than think for themselves, wouldn't you grab it with both hands?


Well seeing as the amount of children who learn to work the family farm or go off to be an apprentice to the local tanner has been on the decline for about a century, where exactly do you think people should go to learn how to be productive?
 
2011-12-11 08:16:28 PM
Almost every revolution that started out university-inspired has failed to even come close to its ideal final state*. For some reason they all tend to end up as totalitarian top-down states.

Why is that? It'd be an interesting class to take.

* I say "almost" because I'm not familiar with revolutions in general, only a few in particular. But it's fark, so why not generalize?
 
2011-12-11 08:17:50 PM

Kar98: astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major

Critical thinking? That's unamerican!


An informed electorate??? COMMUNISM!
 
2011-12-11 08:21:36 PM
....never before have Liberal Arts majors been so qualified to man the deep fryer

That should be staff the deep fryer, you unreconstructed sexist patriarch. Quit colonizing wimmin's headspace about the role of gender and labor.
 
2011-12-11 08:54:34 PM
I say we set up a drum circle here and bang away until the 1% jerks who belittle our education submit to our demands!
 
2011-12-11 08:56:55 PM
Does subby know what the "Liberal Arts" include?

Six members of my immediate family have liberal arts degrees: four in the hard sciences, two in math.
 
2011-12-11 09:11:23 PM

DanInKansas: ....never before have Liberal Arts majors been so qualified to man the deep fryer

That should be staff the deep fryer, you unreconstructed sexist patriarch. Quit colonizing wimmin's headspace about the role of gender and labor.


Women staff the registers, Men man the deep fryers.

Really, the one time the men are the one staying in the kitchen and making sammiches, and you want to send the women back in to do it?
 
2011-12-11 09:13:02 PM

Shirley Ujest: I've come up with a degree that I think would be real popular.


Go to College to get a degree in being an Asshole. Learn from Real Assholes. Assholes who have been running Big Industry and Assholes working in Politics and every other sector making a Name for themselves!

Eventually, it would be it's own educational building: Asshole University. Team Mascot: The Gamecocks.

I think I'm on to something here, I might as well capitalize on it.



/can't wait to see how the filters handle this.


So..a College Republican then?
 
2011-12-11 09:32:48 PM

DaShredda: Unaware you are of the millions of artists that make your lives enjoyable.

Take away all the artists in the world.... Take away every movie. Every book. Every video game. Every piece of fashion.

What are you engineers working for then? Just to stay alive? Are you insects? Without artists, your life is simply eating and shiatting. An animal. No different than a badger.

I'm not saying art is the sole important factor in life.

Without engineering, there wouldn't be art. Without art, there wouldn't be a need for engineering.

If you really hate art, take a week of your life. Don't watch any movies, don't play any video games, and don't listen to any music. Wear only what is comfortable and nothing that 'looks good'. Eat only for sustenance, because cooking is an art.

Wake up, eat, and work. Then come home and sit, or exercise, because there is no art. See how awesome life is.


You would have a point if the aforementioned classes were actually creating art.

I conceed that the circus arts could lead to someone becoming a performer and thus a creator of art, but the rest create nothing and the argument they are the only, or even a significant, way one develops critical thinking is spurious.

"Art for art's sake is an empty phrase. Art for the sake of truth, art for the sake of the good and the beautiful, that is the faith I am searching for."
- George Sand
 
2011-12-11 09:37:25 PM

rebelyell2006: By that logic we might as well stop going to college because no undergrad degree in and of itself will help put food on the table.


Speak for yourself, John.

I had a very nice DOE job with a dual physics/EE undergrad, then co-started a design business, and went on to get my Masters later.
 
2011-12-11 09:41:34 PM
Actually, even as a injunir most of these classes sound interesting as electives. I'd have loved to take an advanced cooking class.

/already knew how to juggle
//(looks around sheepishly) I took voice and sung opera chorus. Don't tell anyone.
 
2011-12-11 09:42:11 PM
/sung/sang
 
2011-12-11 10:01:17 PM
Let's understand how this works folks:
Engineering majors: build nuclear weapons
Philosophy majors: justify the use of nuclear weapons

Which one looks more evil now?
 
2011-12-11 10:15:22 PM

erewhon: rebelyell2006: By that logic we might as well stop going to college because no undergrad degree in and of itself will help put food on the table.

Speak for yourself, John.

I had a very nice DOE job with a dual physics/EE undergrad, then co-started a design business, and went on to get my Masters later.


Yeah, well you went with a government job, and earned a higher degree. Government jobs are pretty rare, and that higher degree is essential. That's what I am working on right now.
/and don't call me John.
 
2011-12-11 10:19:23 PM

Calehedron: DaShredda: Calehedron: You just described my life.

Fo rizzle?

What do you do?

I am a maintenance technician at one of the largest semi conductor companies in da world. Between the 12hr shifts, 40min commute each way (with 3 carpoolers... I try to be greenish), and getting ready in the morning, I have 1-2 hrs left in each day outside sleeping. I dont have time for art on those days. Luckily its only 3/4 days a week and I enjoy my time off catching up on everything I havent done the first half of the week.

I also got all my electro-mechanical training in the Army in 1987-88. AC and DC were 40 hour classes, one week. Test out and move on. Semis may have been 2 weeks. No time for fancy stuff.


Freescale?
 
2011-12-11 10:35:04 PM
Liberal arts courses were often the courses that many of us hard science majors used to pad our GPA's.

That being said, I took a course in the history of Rock music and ended up being better at analyzing chord progressions and musical elements than many of the music majors in the class.

/Biology major
 
2011-12-11 11:18:02 PM

rebelyell2006: Yeah, well you went with a government job, and earned a higher degree. Government jobs are pretty rare, and that higher degree is essential. That's what I am working on right now.
/and don't call me John.


Humanities degrees CAN pay - learn Urdu, for example. If you can get a TS/SCI, State would LOVE you.

/middle Eastern languages + polysci = buckage
 
2011-12-11 11:31:19 PM
I took Wine Insights at Rutgers, so I'm getting a kick out of most of these replies. Not only is it an elective, but it's a one-credit elective. When I took it there were only 3 tastings, held outside of class hours, and they didn't count towards the grade. There was a midterm and a final, and you did have to study for them.

/class was taught by an entomology professor
//also took another one-credit elective, "35mm Photography" taught by a plant pathology professor
///yeah, i said 35mm. get off my lawn
 
2011-12-11 11:42:35 PM

erewhon: rebelyell2006: Yeah, well you went with a government job, and earned a higher degree. Government jobs are pretty rare, and that higher degree is essential. That's what I am working on right now.
/and don't call me John.

Humanities degrees CAN pay - learn Urdu, for example. If you can get a TS/SCI, State would LOVE you.

/middle Eastern languages + polysci = buckage


That is true. The same for most foreign languages, with the exception that outside of those state jobs, and graduate assistantship positions, most employers would want something else. For schools, that would be teaching degrees or certificates.
 
2011-12-11 11:55:51 PM

Krustofsky: Liberal arts courses were often the courses that many of us hard science majors used to pad our GPA's.

That being said, I took a course in the history of Rock music and ended up being better at analyzing chord progressions and musical elements than many of the music majors in the class.

/Biology major


Let's get this straight: liberal arts /= humanities

More specifically, humanities + science + math = the liberal arts.
 
2011-12-12 12:50:57 AM

rebelyell2006: For schools, that would be teaching degrees or certificates.


Teaching. It is a thing I have no talent for.
 
2011-12-12 12:51:33 AM
/and apparently you can add basic English grammar to that list as well
 
2011-12-12 12:54:32 AM

erewhon: rebelyell2006: For schools, that would be teaching degrees or certificates.

Teaching. It is a thing I have no talent for.


erewhon: /and apparently you can add basic English grammar to that list as well


Same here. That's why I'm working on a museum studies degree, so I can hide in collections storage for the rest of my life with the artifacts.
 
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