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(NJ.com)   From "Circus Arts" and "The Harry Potter Phenomenon" to "'South Park' and Philosophy" and "Wine Insights", never before have Liberal Arts majors been so qualified to man the deep fryer   (nj.com) divider line 115
    More: Silly, South Park, New Jersey, Fairleigh Dickinson University, East Rutherford, American College of Sofia, local college, tightropes, arts  
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5161 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2011 at 3:53 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-12-11 03:54:39 PM
God forbid we educate students beyond the capabilities of a pocket calculator.
 
2011-12-11 03:54:55 PM
It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major
 
2011-12-11 03:57:00 PM

astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major


I can't wait until everybody gets a career chip. No need for thought or education. Plug the chip in and do your job, citizen.
 
2011-12-11 03:57:37 PM
I'll just leave this here:

Whedonology: An Academic Whedon Studies Bibliography (new window)
 
2011-12-11 03:59:53 PM
Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

Also, why is architecture students doing Habitat for Humanity unusual? It follows their career and gives them practical experience.
 
2011-12-11 04:00:23 PM
But...but...Business majors.
 
2011-12-11 04:02:24 PM

Teen Wolf Blitzer: God forbid we educate students beyond the capabilities of a pocket calculator.


Careful, you'll confuse the engineers
 
2011-12-11 04:05:13 PM

astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major


Critical thinking? That's unamerican!
 
2011-12-11 04:06:15 PM
Laugh all you want Subby, but being able to jump through hoops will help you work in any modern bureaucracy.
 
2011-12-11 04:06:43 PM
The circus one is the least ridiculous because at least circuses are a product people pay money to see and thus, is an employment opportunity.

No one is saying learning new things and so forth is bad. But when all you're learning is stuff you like and not anything needed to produce something, you're doing it wrong. Adults need to know how to produce a sustainable life for themselves and their families. Whether through being a cog in some bureaucratic machine or being the next "outside the box" innovator like Steve Jobs, you still need to know how to do something with your life the produces a sustainable living for you and your dependents. So go read about teen sexuality in the 80s, or the philosophy of South Park. If that kind of thing helps you become a more critical thinker or get some more enjoyment out of life, awesome. But you'd also better being doing something that allows you to pay your bills without taking someone else's money as a handout. If you can't, go learn something productive.

Maslow's heirarchy of needs still applies, and as an adult, you are responsible for fulfilling them for yourself and your family. If you're focusing your time and energy on learning creativity and philosophy, but depending on taxpayer handouts to fulfill your food and housing needs, you are failing at life.
 
2011-12-11 04:08:03 PM
I don't regret going to a liberal arts school. I regret being high/drunk the whole time. Everyone I knew in school who gave a shiat and took advantage of the oppurtunities the school offered are now successfully making good money and doing what they love, while I pick up dog shiat for $12/hr.
 
2011-12-11 04:08:36 PM
www.lowbird.com
 
2011-12-11 04:09:19 PM

Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.


If you need a full undergraduate degree program to teach you that, you're already hopelessly uncouth.
 
2011-12-11 04:09:27 PM
Teen Wolf Blitzer:
God forbid we educate students beyond the capabilities of a pocket calculator.

I've been through that sort of course, and "education" isn't really the word you should be using there.

I took a class in the works of Carlos Castaneda (who, it turned out, was a big fraud, but the teacher didn't know that) back in the 1970s, and it was a semester of talking about the books for a few minutes, then sitting around goofing off with the teacher for the rest of the time. There were no tests, and the final was a joke (the only way to get less than an "A" was to not show up - and then you only got a "C").

For that sort of "education," there was a very nice pizza parlor a block away that cost less and had better seats.
 
2011-12-11 04:09:30 PM
blow off classes are nothing new. I had a few myself back in college. Bowling, History of rock and roll, Geology 101 (aka Rocks for Jocks)...
 
2011-12-11 04:10:25 PM
I'm a college professor, so I'm... actually, I have too many papers to grade to be getting a kick out of much at this time of the semester.

Though the topics may be unusual, the freshman seminars are designed to teach time management, college-level writing and other key skills.

Good. My courses tend to have the standard textbook/lecture/exams/paper format, and the thing that is killing most of the students who don't do well in my classes is things like time management and college-level writing skills. I'd rather have a student spend a semester playing acrobat if that course is structured in a way that teaches them skills that will help them do well in my more-traditional courses.

And if the students are actually learning actual philosophy when they take "South Park and Philosophy," or actual sociology when they take "Sociology of Salsa," then I have no problem with presenting legitimate scholarly work in an original format. Heck, if it'd get basic principles of psychological theories and research into my students heads, I'd be happy to change one of my Intro Psych courses to "Psychology of Fark.com".
 
2011-12-11 04:11:13 PM
This is why they're called electives. You need the credits anyway.
 
2011-12-11 04:11:46 PM

Tellingthem: blow off classes are nothing new. I had a few myself back in college. Bowling, History of rock and roll, Geology 101 (aka Rocks for Jocks)..


Really? While not the most difficult course it is a science and part of any science curriculum.
 
2011-12-11 04:12:11 PM

Son of Thunder: I'd be happy to change one of my Intro Psych courses to "Psychology of Fark.com".


I think you'd have to dig much deeper than just an intro course on that. It sounds like a 3-year program, to me.
 
2011-12-11 04:13:23 PM

Son of Thunder: I'd be happy to change one of my Intro Psych courses to "Psychology of Fark.com".


They already have that. It is called Abnormal Psych.
 
2011-12-11 04:13:49 PM

Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.


DNRTFA, but it sounds like it could be useful for someone seeking to start a winery or brewery.
 
2011-12-11 04:14:49 PM

Sabyen91: Tellingthem: blow off classes are nothing new. I had a few myself back in college. Bowling, History of rock and roll, Geology 101 (aka Rocks for Jocks)..

Really? While not the most difficult course it is a science and part of any science curriculum.


Geology yes, This class no. Anytime the entire football team takes a specific class you can be sure that it is a blow off class. Hence the name "Rocks for Jocks".
 
2011-12-11 04:15:11 PM
It's a private college teaching courses to students outside their majors. Who farking cares?

Electives outside of your field of study? The horror!
 
2011-12-11 04:16:24 PM

Tellingthem: Sabyen91: Tellingthem: blow off classes are nothing new. I had a few myself back in college. Bowling, History of rock and roll, Geology 101 (aka Rocks for Jocks)..

Really? While not the most difficult course it is a science and part of any science curriculum.

Geology yes, This class no. Anytime the entire football team takes a specific class you can be sure that it is a blow off class. Hence the name "Rocks for Jocks".


Ahh, at my college it was a real course (of course the UW also has high standards for the jocks as well).
 
2011-12-11 04:18:23 PM
Unaware you are of the millions of artists that make your lives enjoyable.

Take away all the artists in the world.... Take away every movie. Every book. Every video game. Every piece of fashion.

What are you engineers working for then? Just to stay alive? Are you insects? Without artists, your life is simply eating and shiatting. An animal. No different than a badger.

I'm not saying art is the sole important factor in life.

Without engineering, there wouldn't be art. Without art, there wouldn't be a need for engineering.

If you really hate art, take a week of your life. Don't watch any movies, don't play any video games, and don't listen to any music. Wear only what is comfortable and nothing that 'looks good'. Eat only for sustenance, because cooking is an art.

Wake up, eat, and work. Then come home and sit, or exercise, because there is no art. See how awesome life is.
 
2011-12-11 04:19:43 PM

Dee Snarl: [www.lowbird.com image 300x391]

 
2011-12-11 04:19:48 PM
I wonder if they can balance a checkbook.
 
2011-12-11 04:19:56 PM
I would totally take a course in "Fundamentals of Comedy Writing & Performing". If you can learn how to write funny material and stand up and give a good talk, that's transferable to almost any intellectual job there is. CEO, project leader, marketing and sales, teacher, academic presenter... all relevant.
 
2011-12-11 04:20:06 PM
Many of the best/most fun opportunities I've had with my current employer were made possible by my hobbies and prior exposure to subjects outside the core subject matter of my degree.

It's been incredible seeing the unconnected experiences of my past come into play time and again. It truly keeps life interesting.
 
2011-12-11 04:21:17 PM

EmeraldArcana: I would totally take a course in "Fundamentals of Comedy Writing & Performing". If you can learn how to write funny material and stand up and give a good talk, that's transferable to almost any intellectual job there is. CEO, project leader, marketing and sales, teacher, academic presenter... all relevant.


or just a witty Fark commentor.
 
2011-12-11 04:23:11 PM

Enigmamf: Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

DNRTFA, but it sounds like it could be useful for someone seeking to start a winery or brewery.


...or anyone in the hospitality
 
2011-12-11 04:23:30 PM

Sabyen91: Tellingthem: Sabyen91: Tellingthem: blow off classes are nothing new. I had a few myself back in college. Bowling, History of rock and roll, Geology 101 (aka Rocks for Jocks)..

Really? While not the most difficult course it is a science and part of any science curriculum.

Geology yes, This class no. Anytime the entire football team takes a specific class you can be sure that it is a blow off class. Hence the name "Rocks for Jocks".

Ahh, at my college it was a real course (of course the UW also has high standards for the jocks as well).


Once you got past the first one then they usually got serious and interesting. But the school had certain classes like this in almost every field. They were all basically show up and get an A type of classes. And if you were an athlete the showing up part was optional.
 
2011-12-11 04:23:57 PM

GoldSpider: Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

If you need a full undergraduate degree program to teach you that, you're already hopelessly uncouth lower middle class.


Fixed that for you.
 
2011-12-11 04:26:38 PM

GoldSpider: Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

If you need a full undergraduate degree program to teach you that, you're already hopelessly uncouth.


Huh, I was not aware that a single elective course apparently equals an entire undergraduate degree, nowadays.

Or you're just a dumbass. Either one.
 
2011-12-11 04:28:30 PM
I took a heap of strange electives in college. Rock Music of the 70s and 80s, The Music of Frank Zappa, The History and Social Impact of Video Games, Star Trek and Religion, Video Killed The Radio Star: Music Videos of the 1980s.

Rather than being twaddle, they were actually the most interesting and insightful classes I took. Essentially, they applied all the same concepts of any other anthropology course -- only instead of applying them to past or foreign cultures, they were applied to aspects of current society. With each one, you came away with a richer understanding of what makes modern culture what it is, and how it helps make us what we are. (And also makes it a little easier to divorce yourself from some of those workings, if you'd prefer.)

We're all inundated with pop culture. Why -not- learn about what makes it tick, or explore various -isms through these more familiar lenses? What's more fulfilling to do: to learn about populism only in terms of scholarly papers, or to learn about populism in terms of scholarly papers AND in how they are embodied in folk music, southern rock, and Springsteen, AND then discuss how the music was shaped by society and went on to shape it, itself? You learn the same concepts and read the same key texts -- but, with one, you learn to apply it even to stuff that people think is intellectually devoid.

All that being said, I do think that critical thinking and rhetoric should be mandatory courses for all students -- starting in elementary school.
 
2011-12-11 04:29:22 PM
i291.photobucket.com
 
2011-12-11 04:39:34 PM
People have heard of "electives," right? Sometimes you have an extra 3 credit hours to fill to meet full time student reqs, the class you want is full, and you can put in an easy A into the schedule. I did this a few times in my undergrad.
 
2011-12-11 04:43:20 PM
www.joewojciechowski.com
 
2011-12-11 04:43:27 PM

verbaltoxin: People have heard of "electives," right? Sometimes you have an extra 3 credit hours to fill to meet full time student reqs, the class you want is full, and you can put in an easy A into the schedule. I did this a few times in my undergrad.


Not to mention the fact that after fulfilling the general education requirements, the language requirements and the requirements for the major, there are still plenty of credit hours left over. Especially when the school won't let students take more than 48 credit hours within their major's department.
 
2011-12-11 04:43:53 PM

astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major


your job must suck, and you obviously have less than zero clue about other professions.
 
2011-12-11 04:45:05 PM

illicit: GoldSpider: Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

If you need a full undergraduate degree program to teach you that, you're already hopelessly uncouth.

Huh, I was not aware that a single elective course apparently equals an entire undergraduate degree, nowadays.

Or you're just a dumbass. Either one.


You didn't expect me to read the article, did you?
 
2011-12-11 04:47:08 PM

BlippityBleep: astro716: It's true, tackling a new subject and thinking critically about it is something that nobody ever needs to do in their job.

/hard sciences major

your job must suck, and you obviously have less than zero clue about other professions.


I thought he was being sarcastic.
 
2011-12-11 04:48:22 PM

DaShredda: Unaware you are of the millions of artists that make your lives enjoyable.

Take away all the artists in the world.... Take away every movie. Every book. Every video game. Every piece of fashion.

What are you engineers working for then? Just to stay alive? Are you insects? Without artists, your life is simply eating and shiatting. An animal. No different than a badger.

I'm not saying art is the sole important factor in life.

Without engineering, there wouldn't be art. Without art, there wouldn't be a need for engineering.

If you really hate art, take a week of your life. Don't watch any movies, don't play any video games, and don't listen to any music. Wear only what is comfortable and nothing that 'looks good'. Eat only for sustenance, because cooking is an art.

Wake up, eat, and work. Then come home and sit, or exercise, because there is no art. See how awesome life is.


You just described my life.
 
2011-12-11 04:49:00 PM

GoldSpider: illicit: GoldSpider: Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

If you need a full undergraduate degree program to teach you that, you're already hopelessly uncouth.

Huh, I was not aware that a single elective course apparently equals an entire undergraduate degree, nowadays.

Or you're just a dumbass. Either one.

You didn't expect me to read the article, did you?


Maybe you need some critical-thinking liberal-arts classes, because I knew from the headline those weren't majors but classes.

But then again my job doesn't consist of my boss giving me a stack of math problems to crunch.
 
2011-12-11 04:50:59 PM
My BA is in Computer Science and Mathematics. You can't explain that.
 
2011-12-11 04:51:01 PM

DaShredda: GoldSpider: illicit: GoldSpider: Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

If you need a full undergraduate degree program to teach you that, you're already hopelessly uncouth.

Huh, I was not aware that a single elective course apparently equals an entire undergraduate degree, nowadays.

Or you're just a dumbass. Either one.

You didn't expect me to read the article, did you?

Maybe you need some critical-thinking liberal-arts classes, because I knew from the headline those weren't majors but classes.

But then again my job doesn't consist of my boss giving me a stack of math problems to crunch.


Its the weekend, and reading is hard.
 
2011-12-11 04:51:12 PM

Calehedron: You just described my life.


Fo rizzle?

What do you do?
 
2011-12-11 04:53:25 PM
Once again, Fark has deceptively ignored the difference between a college course and a college major.
 
2011-12-11 04:53:29 PM

edmo: My BA is in Computer Science and Mathematics. You can't explain that.


NO
LIBERAL ARTS IS FINGER PAINTINGS
I'M AND ENGINEER AN I KNOW THESE THINGS
MEN ARE WHO DO CALCULATIONS AND SCIENCES
ARTS IS FOR SISSIES WHO TAKE LANGUAGES AND DRAWINGS
MY BOSS TELLS ME WHAT TO DO
 
2011-12-11 04:55:37 PM

Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

Also, why is architecture students doing Habitat for Humanity unusual? It follows their career and gives them practical experience.


THis is what I'm thinking...I see these courses being of far more use in real life than circus arts.

GoldSpider: Ed Willy: Actually, Wine and Fine Dining classes mentioned could be very useful for a business or prelaw major who needs to know the etiquette of dealing with classy situation.

If you need a full undergraduate degree program to teach you that, you're already hopelessly uncouth.


What about sommeliers?
 
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