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(Wired)   Didn't Get That New Job? You Need a Better Facebook Score   (wired.com) divider line 100
    More: Scary, Facebook Score, Facebook, consumer rights  
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19497 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Nov 2011 at 1:16 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-11-22 04:43:03 AM  
This is why my Facebook account is under a fake name, filled out with false information.

It's also why I have multiple email addresses; A primary one, and a satellite ones that redirects everything straight back to the Primary. If an employer googles the address I've given them, they'll find nothing.
 
2011-11-22 04:47:17 AM  

Mama's Boy: So should I give them my tripcode on/b/ or what?


Tripcodes are for Rudy-Poos.
 
2011-11-22 05:13:02 AM  

randomstranger: gadian: Eh? Don't want to hire me because of my online activities? I don't give a fark. Much like I would not give a fark if you didn't hire me because of my tattoos (i don't actually have any) or terrible heroine addiction. If you're going to discriminate based on the things that I enjoy, then I wouldn't enjoy working for you anyway. I'm wouldn't change my online activity nor would I laser off a tattoo that I particularly cared about to suit an employer. Yes, I will find another job, yours isn't the only game in town.

Unless it is. I'm not sure if you've noticed the whole lack-of-decent-jobs thing going on lately.


then they'll take someone else anyway.

someone who has whatever random, non-job related criteria, that they want.

if I restart a fb account, and try to give it some generic "I'm a fun person" activity, or try to pump up my personal twitter account by sending follows to 40,000 people and retweeting like an idiot to get a better klout score, I still most likely wouldn't fit whatever random, non-job related criteria that they have becuase I've no idea what that criteria is?

Do they look for fb or twitter posts that are pertinent to my job? well they won't find any because I'm under a strong NDA (and no, they can't see a code portfolio of my professional work, none of it doesn't belong to me). Do they look for evidence of my hobbies? Well they'll find I'm into hydroponics, and then you can imagine the assumptions there (I have peppers, tomatoes, oregano and rosemary). They'll also find that I've built a twitter api and, by extention, oauth client in ruby for shiats and giggles. That's useless also because in any real world application I'd be using the third party api's and not building my own non-optimised command line versions just for the hell of it in order to learn me some Ruby.

However, if I was going for a job in a client facing PR role, then yes, I think some of this is appropriate. In proportion to the likelyhood that a client will google you.
 
2011-11-22 05:13:10 AM  
The only thing a search of my real name pulls up is my Google+ account. The only information there shows I have 4 friends in my circle - my daughter, my SO and a friend of mine that is a professional classical musician.

I look like a quiet, normal human being. I appear to do nothing with my free time than stay in with family and listen to classical music.
 
2011-11-22 05:14:17 AM  
Please tell me these asshats aren't getting any serious investor money.
 
2011-11-22 05:26:42 AM  
The real money in providing this service to employers is *not* the money that employers will pay to search it, it is in creating buzz so millions of people will pay to ego-search. And thousands will pay for FBScore improvement services. Then we'll have FBScore monitoring packages. Sounds.... familiar...
 
2011-11-22 05:50:37 AM  
Potential employer would have to know my fark handle to read me on the webs. Deleted my fb a few weeks back. Found myself arguing politics and religion, occasionally pissing off my parents/relatives. Prefer the snark and anonymity of fark. Also considering a run at city council. Opposition would have a field day with some of the inappropriate shiat I've put on there!
 
2011-11-22 06:13:02 AM  
Is it me or did the Entire article read like an ad? Supposed to?

/need coffee.
 
2011-11-22 06:16:29 AM  

Coastalgrl: Is it me or did the Entire article read like an ad? Supposed to?

/need coffee.


I had the same feeling.
Advertising with a hint of extortion.
 
2011-11-22 06:23:13 AM  
I have a question that hopefully someone will be willing to answer :D

I do not have FaceBook, Myspace, Twitter, or anything else. I cannot be found anywhere on the internet under my full name, even on those (essentially Stalking-Made-Easy) 'find anyone in the us for $15' sites.

How does that really and truly effect me? I haven't had a job in a year despite being great at what I do. I can't be looked up and my abilities SHOULD get me the job. but I cannot help but wonder if not being you on the internet has any bearing on that. I'm not saying that it is a problem.
My hypothesis is that it is possible that employers don't like NOT seeing social networking going on. Would they disregard someone's ability to do a job because the person wasn't open and available with ALL personal issues?

I honestly don't know. I thought it was a slightly interesting thought. A higher-up would have a psychological advantage over an employee, even if hired, simply because of this crap.

People in power play power trips and always need ammunition.
 
2011-11-22 06:32:32 AM  

DeRosso: And yet again, people who jumped on the various social media now see how they farked themselves over.


We've had stories like this since FB's inception. And they will not go away.

Right now there is a teenager somewhere in America who will someday run for president of the US. Today, he is posting horribly disturbing juvenile thoughts on the internet. 40 years from now, he will learn all about redundancy servers and the like.

The first rule was "Don't send any email you would not want to see on the front page of the NYTimes."

I guess the next rule is "On social network sites, discuss every topic as though you are on a first date."
 
2011-11-22 06:46:53 AM  

August11: DeRosso: And yet again, people who jumped on the various social media now see how they farked themselves over.

We've had stories like this since FB's inception. And they will not go away.

Right now there is a teenager somewhere in America who will someday run for president of the US. Today, he is posting horribly disturbing juvenile thoughts on the internet. 40 years from now, he will learn all about redundancy servers and the like.

The first rule was "Don't send any email you would not want to see on the front page of the NYTimes."

I guess the next rule is "On social network sites, discuss every topic as though you are on a first date."


I got action on the first date. If not a heavy petting session then full on boink-boink time.

\why did I stop dating?
\\I fell in love and got married
 
2011-11-22 06:48:16 AM  

accelerus: And even if I was "public" I have the 2nd most common last name in the US :) So good luck with that.


Hernandez?
 
2011-11-22 07:35:44 AM  

Memes Ate My Balls: Finally, a simple and accurate way to find qualified Java developers.


That line from the article caught my attention, since I am a Java developer - there is nothing on my Facebook page (peer pressure) or LinkedIn (also peer pressure) that even says I'm a Java developer, let alone if I'm any good at it. All those sites really say about me is that I give in to peer pressure to join social media sites. This sounds like a stupid idea.
 
2011-11-22 07:45:19 AM  

illannoyin: Reason #1,624,291 not to be on facebook.


"And here we have candidate #346 with a facebook score of zero..."

"Bottom of the pile"
 
2011-11-22 07:55:05 AM  
I work in HR and we aren't willing to start looking into applicants social media accounts. It's a bad idea on so many levels.

I mean, you will potentially nose into stuff like that and learn about their medical issues, sexual orientation, how many small children they have and other things we are not legally allowed to ask about. Plus, we don't really care whether somebody gets drunk every weekend as long as they do their job while they are on the clock.
 
2011-11-22 08:02:04 AM  
and what about people with the same name as you? there are like 50 people on facebook with the same name as me, and according to whitepages.com there are over 400 people in the united states with the same name. how could a company possibly know which one is me?

interesting side note: upon googling myself, i discovered that a man with the same name as me apparently murdered his wife in new york last year. so that's why none of the women i email on dating sites ever respond.
 
2011-11-22 08:02:47 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: I'm a highly paid enterprise network "guru", and I couldn't care less about and have never even been to the sites of Facebook, Twitter, or any other so called "social" networking site. I've got better things to do than interact with a bunch of intellectual pylons. Present company excluded of course. lol


I don't have a Facebook page is the new "I don't even own a TV".
 
2011-11-22 08:03:12 AM  
I don't mix social media with work, so my score would be poor. I'm fine with this. I'm not in to this idea that I need to run my fb page like it's a marketing department. I just use the site as a rolodex.
 
2011-11-22 08:06:23 AM  

August11: DeRosso: And yet again, people who jumped on the various social media now see how they farked themselves over.

We've had stories like this since FB's inception. And they will not go away.

Right now there is a teenager somewhere in America who will someday run for president of the US. Today, he is posting horribly disturbing juvenile thoughts on the internet. 40 years from now, he will learn all about redundancy servers and the like.

The first rule was "Don't send any email you would not want to see on the front page of the NYTimes."

I guess the next rule is "On social network sites, discuss every topic as though you are on a first date."


Right now there is technology that can scan facial recognition and search every photograph available on the internet anywhere. its only a matter of time before these shady datamining sites like spokeo will have that ability. It doesn't matter anymore if you post your own info on the web, anytime you are anywhere doing anything there are people with smart phones posting picturesand video to their social networking site. Even if you're just in the background of a photo snapped at a colle party of some people doing drugs, or at a gay bar, doing a kegstand, or blowing your ex bf, that picture has the potential to be tied to you for perpetuity. Your identity can be triangulated anywhere, maybe a high school article, an employer's website, maybe if a resume you submitted offline but wound up sold in a database somehow. Now also think that every photo taken of you in the last decade is about to surface in just a few years. Things are about to get interesting.

The only way to win by the current rules is to literally have no life.
 
2011-11-22 08:12:42 AM  

poxic: There's some blonde chick in the US who has the same name as me. She's pretty much the only thing that comes up when you search on my name, since she has a buttload of Facebook posts.

I kind of look forward to someone studying up on this person, then being flummoxed when I walk through the door. (Note: am not blonde, nor do I look anything remotely like her.)


Similar thing with me. If you google my name, you get a musician in NYC. He has a website and everything; hopefully future employers aren't stupid enough to think it's me.

My facebook is set to friends only. The picture is of my wife and I after a mud run 5k; I figure the picture shows that we're active.
 
2011-11-22 08:17:28 AM  
The results are in... and it says you are a horrible person! We didn't even test for that!
 
2011-11-22 08:17:29 AM  

ChuDogg: August11: DeRosso: And yet again, people who jumped on the various social media now see how they farked themselves over.

We've had stories like this since FB's inception. And they will not go away.

Right now there is a teenager somewhere in America who will someday run for president of the US. Today, he is posting horribly disturbing juvenile thoughts on the internet. 40 years from now, he will learn all about redundancy servers and the like.

The first rule was "Don't send any email you would not want to see on the front page of the NYTimes."

I guess the next rule is "On social network sites, discuss every topic as though you are on a first date."

Right now there is technology that can scan facial recognition and search every photograph available on the internet anywhere. its only a matter of time before these shady datamining sites like spokeo will have that ability. It doesn't matter anymore if you post your own info on the web, anytime you are anywhere doing anything there are people with smart phones posting picturesand video to their social networking site. Even if you're just in the background of a photo snapped at a colle party of some people doing drugs, or at a gay bar, doing a kegstand, or blowing your ex bf, that picture has the potential to be tied to you for perpetuity. Your identity can be triangulated anywhere, maybe a high school article, an employer's website, maybe if a resume you submitted offline but wound up sold in a database somehow. Now also think that every photo taken of you in the last decade is about to surface in just a few years. Things are about to get interesting.

The only way to win by the current rules is to literally have no life.


Score!
 
2011-11-22 08:27:08 AM  
Yeah, let's allow another third party to have undue influence over peoples' lives, because credit reporting agencies aren't bad enough.
 
2011-11-22 08:28:51 AM  
I can see our entire HR beehive splooshing over such a site.
 
2011-11-22 08:29:38 AM  

illannoyin: Reason #1,624,291 not to be on facebook.


This.
 
2011-11-22 08:43:01 AM  

HotWingConspiracy: I don't mix social media with work, so my score would be poor. I'm fine with this. I'm not in to this idea that I need to run my fb page like it's a marketing department. I just use the site as a rolodex.


Pretty much this. I also occasionally post nerdy things on there to bookmark the sites. I doubt anyone is going to find anything incriminating on there even if I made my profile information public. I don't even talk about my personal life on there much. When I was going through my divorce, the only thing anyone noticed was the change in relationship status without an explanation. I figure that the people who really needed to know about it already discussed it with me in person.
 
2011-11-22 08:43:19 AM  
While I don't like the idea of MORE bullshiat criteria being used to whittle the list of applicants for a job, I think this is just a form of occupational social Darwinism. If you're dumb enough to plaster a status on your profile like ("This weekend sucked, got arrested. Thought Canada was cool with weed??"--that is an ACTUAL status from an applicant, btw), then you deserve to be set aside.

I want an applicant who's AT LEAST smart enough to make their profile private.
 
2011-11-22 08:45:59 AM  
Because no one lies on the Internet.

/my facebook score? zero
//and happy to keep it there
 
2011-11-22 09:20:16 AM  

enderthexenocide: and what about people with the same name as you? there are like 50 people on facebook with the same name as me, and according to whitepages.com there are over 400 people in the united states with the same name. how could a company possibly know which one is me?

interesting side note: upon googling myself, i discovered that a man with the same name as me apparently murdered his wife in new york last year. so that's why none of the women i email on dating sites ever respond.


If you are applying for a job, the information on your resume/application would be enough to narrow it down to the correct person in 99% of the cases (or more).
 
2011-11-22 09:40:47 AM  

cheetahsaresexy: How does that really and truly effect me?


Depends. Are you going to be trying to get a real job or did you plan on trying to be an executive so you can spend 90% of your time spit-shining other people's knobs on the golf course instead of doing anything useful?

Because unless you have some pretty ugly shiat publicly available, it's probably not going to hurt your attempts at a real job at all. An executive position? Ehh... really depends on the sector. Some sectors are getting bigger on social media exposure, others still not so much.
 
2011-11-22 10:01:36 AM  
Great. So now if I'm seeking a job, employers can insist that I make my facebook profile public, or else I clearly "have something to hide."
 
2011-11-22 10:11:10 AM  
FTFA: Reppify will look across a candidate's resume and connections to build scores for "reputation," "influence," "footprint," and "overall candidacy" - all based on parameters set by the hiring manager himself.

step 1: take stack of resumes from top 20 candidates
step 2: toss resumes down flight of stairs
step 3: walk down the stairs and pick of the first resume you come to. Hire this person

/if you're going to select your employee based on random bs, at least be quick about it
 
2011-11-22 10:15:56 AM  

Tommy Moo: Great. So now if I'm seeking a job, employers can insist that I make my facebook profile public, or else I clearly "have something to hide."


No, they wont be able to do that, at least not for long. However, they will be able to remove you from the hiring pool if they don't see a nice social media whatever. You'll never know.
 
2011-11-22 10:22:17 AM  
I am always amused by HR people and their complete lack of grip on reality. The people suggesting this are probably the same ones who hired all those former truck drivers in 1999 to run their Networks because "They had MCSE".


They obviously work at new places, because anyone who hired IT staff based on letters is now out of business.
 
2011-11-22 10:31:50 AM  
This does sound like a terrible idea, but it really isn't all that far removed from more "accepted" methods of evaluating potential hires.

Myers-Briggs and other "psychological profile" tests haven't proven to be that helpful either, but companies spend millions to administer those tests to potential recruits.

I can see the developers of this Facebook score successfully peddling their wares to the legions of inept HR staffers who are looking for an easy fix to the hiring problem.
 
2011-11-22 10:36:23 AM  
The company I work for "encourages" people to become FB friends with them. Yeah not in this lifetime.
 
2011-11-22 10:53:16 AM  
I only had one company care about my Facebook profile when I was interviewing. They tried to search me, but couldn't since my profile was locked down. In the interview they asked for login information so they could make sure I wasn't posting anything horrible that would offend the public. I said since the public can't view my profile why would it matter? The HR lady just said those were the rules. I thanked them for taking the time to interview me, but that I didn't feel the company would be a match for me and walked out the door.

I just found it creepy and weird. Almost as creepy as when in the next interview I was asked if I was married, dating anyone, or had kids. I said 'no' to all those questions and was given a creepy with smile with the reply of "Good." I turned down that job when he offered it.
 
2011-11-22 11:00:32 AM  
If, whether or not I used FB or any other social media network, it had ANY pull towards whether I got a job, I don't want that job anyway.
 
2011-11-22 11:10:51 AM  
As an executive level recruiter, I'm getting a kick, etc.

I particularly like the comment about Harvard because I can count on one hand the number of times any client has actually given a shiat about where the candidate went to school and still have fingers left over. As long as they have a bachelor's degree they are golden. And usually the clients don't even confirm that the degree actually exists anyway. But maybe that's just my industry?

Anyone who thinks this tool alone can be used to accurately determine fit for a position would not make a very good recruiter/talent acquisition grunt. And it seems like a waste of money when I can get a better result from just reading a candidate's resume (I am constantly amazed by how few people know how to write a resume) and having an initial call.
 
2011-11-22 11:17:34 AM  
I can understand this. When you have 500 applicants for each job you post, you have to have a chainsaw to make the initial cuts.

I throw away half the resumes I get without looking at them because I don't want to hire anyone who's unlucky.
 
2011-11-22 11:19:47 AM  
A hiring manager might need a new Java developer, and Reppify will look across a candidate's resume and connections to build scores for "reputation," "influence," "footprint," and "overall candidacy" - all based on parameters set by the hiring manager himself.


Good to see that when hiring a Java developer, actually knowing Java doesn't even come into the conversation any more.

Finally, I can go get that engineering job based on my footprint and influence, even though I write software for a living.
 
2011-11-22 02:35:22 PM  
Hey, you can't provide rockstar customer service without having the popularity of a rock star.
 
2011-11-22 04:11:31 PM  
A lot of places view a lack of an online presence as a large liability and "telling detractor" for applicants.

Oddly enough, I've heard this more from friends and coworkers that are in Europe than I have from in North America.
 
2011-11-22 04:29:20 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2011-11-22 08:09:41 PM  

Lsherm: I find this funny because I haven't logged into my Facebook account since they required an *edu address to sign up. Too many ex-girlfriends found me right off the bat, which let me know it was a bad idea.

I also find this funny because it's turning into an advantage, now.

/LinkedIn - you can find me, on the executive level.


That is exactly why I don't have a Facebook account. Often I don't want to be found. I don't consider myself to be unsociable, it is just too much work keeping up with everyone who wants to keep in touch with me. My schedule right now is demanding without having to maintain a dialogue with someone I haven't seen in 10 years.

I guess an added perk is an employer can't do recon on me through Facebook. In this respect, I would have more control over the information they got about me.
 
2011-11-22 09:39:53 PM  

ChuDogg: Right now there is technology that can scan facial recognition and search every photograph available on the internet anywhere. its only a matter of time before these shady datamining sites like spokeo will have that ability. It doesn't matter anymore if you post your own info on the web, anytime you are anywhere doing anything there are people with smart phones posting picturesand video to their social networking site. Even if you're just in the background of a photo ...


I've changed my hairstyle so many times now, I don't know what I look like!

/seriously, go look at my okcupid profile
 
2011-11-22 09:43:39 PM  
This piece of idiocy is from the comments:

If you aren't a skilled person like an engineer, programmer, doctor, lawyer, etc. there's just...nothing for you to do. You have no use, and that's very scary.

No, dude -- YOU'RE scary if you believe this.
 
2011-11-23 02:47:28 AM  

ChuDogg: The only way to win by the current rules is to literally have no life.


Yes! My time has come!
 
2011-11-23 12:59:13 PM  
If a company wants to ask about my social networking use, I will tell them that I am knowledgeable enough about social networking, privacy, and techology, that they'd be hard pressed to find anything on a web search that I have posted using my own name.
 
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