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(9 News)   Energy bracelets powered by placebo effect. YOU DON'T SAY   (9news.com) divider line 148
    More: Obvious, medical doctors, 9News, forensic biologist, models of scientific inquiry, scientific evidence, satellite dish, Colorado State University, Wheat Ridge  
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6380 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Nov 2011 at 12:21 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-11-07 11:03:36 AM
f people believe it will work, it will.
 
2011-11-07 11:09:25 AM
I wrapped it around my car's gas-line and now I get about 30 more mpg.
 
2011-11-07 11:24:14 AM

Because People in power are Stupid: I wrapped it around my car's gas-line and now I get about 30 more mpg.


If you tape one to your antenna, you can hear angels.
 
2011-11-07 11:35:52 AM

PainInTheASP: Because People in power are Stupid: I wrapped it around my car's gas-line and now I get about 30 more mpg.

If you tape one to your antenna, you can hear angels.


Tried that, but all I wind up hearing are the farking Andrews Sisters.
 
2011-11-07 11:38:05 AM
FTFA: When asked if his bracelets are based on solid science, Russakoff pointed to thousands of positive testimonials his company receives.

"Whether or not that would be a scientific proof or not for someone, that's up to the individual to determine," Russakoff said.


If these guys would just come out and say, "some people think it works, you should try it for yourself," I'd be fine with it. Let people waste their money. But the idea that it's up to the individual to decide if thousands of unsourced anecdotes constitute scientific proof is giving me an ulcer right now. It's so stupid....it's not even wrong.
 
2011-11-07 11:54:35 AM
I have a really nice silver bracelet along the order of:

www.patagoniagifts.com

...except it also has two balls on the ends.

Many people have asked me if it's one of those magnetic bracelets and whether or not it works. I'm insulted people assume I'm that stupid.
 
2011-11-07 12:24:08 PM
Sure, if aligning all of my vibecules to the Earth Mother's magnetosphere is just "placebo." Haters gonna hate.
 
2011-11-07 12:24:19 PM

Diogenes: I have a really nice silver bracelet along the order of:

[www.patagoniagifts.com image 342x342]

...except it also has two balls on the ends.

Many people have asked me if it's one of those magnetic bracelets and whether or not it works. I'm insulted people assume I'm that stupid.


WELL? Does it work or not?
 
2011-11-07 12:25:59 PM
Great scam idea. All natural bracelet for those times when you hold your significant others hand in separate clawfoot tubs.
 
2011-11-07 12:26:47 PM
I found this power bracelet in a grave yard one time. All I know is it made travel a hell of alot quicker and healing much easier
 
2011-11-07 12:27:23 PM
These bracelets are made with ZERO death crystals, so you know they are good.
 
2011-11-07 12:27:31 PM
Anytime I see that damned commercial for that "magic bracelet" that "gives you energy" and "restores your balance", my blood boils just a little more, and I idly wish to myself that there was some sort of targeting laser I could use to bring down James Randi.
 
2011-11-07 12:28:45 PM
I'd like to see the same scrutiny applied to faith. Wouldn't that be awesome?
Reporter: "We found that belief in a higher power is merely a placebo effect. There is no god."

When I saw this last night that's the first thought I had.
 
2011-11-07 12:29:02 PM
I can say conclusively that it works, because it worked for me. I've also seen the virgin mother in a vision, and I can taste the difference between GM foods and organic.

Am I doin' it rite?
 
2011-11-07 12:29:07 PM

cbackous: These bracelets are made with ZERO death crystals, so you know they are good.


60% of the time they work every time
 
2011-11-07 12:29:11 PM
I'd say something about how foolish people are to believe such things, then I remember that I have the same flaws. Logical fallacies are a biatch, but also part of humanity.
 
2011-11-07 12:30:10 PM
"That "energy" bracelet you just dropped $30 dollars on may be nothing more than just a placebo"

Well, good thing I didn't take $30 dollars out of the atm machine. Please continue on with this reporting article.
 
2011-11-07 12:30:13 PM
"Whether or not that would be a scientific proof or not for someone, that's up to the individual to determine," Russakoff said.

No, whether or not those anecdotes would be convincing for someone is up to the individual to determine. Whether or not something constitutes scientific proof is, while admittedly sometimes contentious, much more under the purview of certain guidelines: Clinical trials, case studies, internal validity, external validity, single-blind, double-blind, experimental, quasi-experimental and so forth and so on.

Several days before the broadcast of this report, Russakoff emailed 9Wants to Know saying an independent doctor who is not paid by Energy Armor completed a blind study involving his company's bracelets.

The study hasn't been published yet.

That same doctor's books are displayed and for sale at Energy Armor kiosks.


I'm not holding my breath on that study being published in a refereed journal. And yea, you may not pay the guy directly but putting his books for sale at your kiosks (I wonder if they also have Ben Goldacre's "Bad Science" or Massimo Pigliucci's "Nonsense of Stilts" for sale as well) might result in a nice added income.
 
2011-11-07 12:31:00 PM
I'm waiting for the alternative medicine crowd to show up and praise the power of the placebo effect.
 
2011-11-07 12:31:33 PM
In other news, People are stupid.
 
2011-11-07 12:31:59 PM
Several days before the broadcast of this report, Russakoff emailed 9Wants to Know saying an independent doctor who is not paid by Energy Armor completed a blind study involving his company's bracelets.

The study hasn't been published yet.

That same doctor's books are displayed and for sale at Energy Armor kiosks.


i1136.photobucket.com
 
2011-11-07 12:32:28 PM
I'd love to see these come out in the form of a very easily recognisable headband. That way I can spot the wearers straight off and know not to waste any of my time talking to a completely gullible idiot.
 
2011-11-07 12:33:28 PM
img254.imageshack.us

Placebo bands. Don't fall for any of the cheap knock-offs; get the authentic article from these guys (new window). They even have holograms on them.
 
2011-11-07 12:33:28 PM
FTA: "I think it's premised on pseudoscience," Dr. Narda Robinson of Colorado State University said."

Lulz, as a vet at CSU, I encourage you all to look up Narda Robinson.

/pot meet kettle.
 
2011-11-07 12:33:41 PM

elffster: Diogenes: I have a really nice silver bracelet along the order of:

[www.patagoniagifts.com image 342x342]

...except it also has two balls on the ends.

Many people have asked me if it's one of those magnetic bracelets and whether or not it works. I'm insulted people assume I'm that stupid.

WELL? Does it work or not?

"no beginning, no ending, the continuity of everlasting love and binding together or intertwining of two soul or spirits."


I'm gonna say no.

But then again, I bought two celtic knot rings for me and my first gf long ago. That didn't work out either. Stupid celts.
 
2011-11-07 12:34:09 PM

cbackous: These bracelets are made with ZERO death crystals, so you know they are good.


A good one should have at least one death crystal in it.
 
2011-11-07 12:34:38 PM
I found this heavy silver bracelet buried by itself in a grave in Haiti. It goes all the way up to elbow. I'm still wearing it today, mostly because it's become embedded in my arm. It kinda sucks because I have to wear long sleeve shirts all the time, but on the plus side, I can summon undead minions.
 
2011-11-07 12:34:55 PM
There is no Santa Claus, Christopher Columbus was a slave-driving fraud, there is no real fruit in those juice boxes you drank as a child, Luke raped Laura, Luke slipped Leia the tongue at least once, Dora was an illegal immigrant on at least one episode, Clifford was a genetic mutation that will probably die a painful death, Steve Martin hasn't been funny or relevant in 20 years, Strawberries have more vitamin C than oranges, Mister Rogers is dead, PeeWee Herman was a sexual deviant, Andy Rooney was actually a nice/calm guy in his youth, Hitler was a Jew, Jesus was a Jew, Muhammed was actually a stick figure like the one I drew on the wall of that mosque, Sega used to be a console maker....

these are hard truths and you are ruined for learning them
 
2011-11-07 12:36:37 PM
I work with a girl who came in with a " really powerful magnet" bracelet that was supposed to ease her pain. It wouldn't even stick to a file cabinet.
 
2011-11-07 12:39:54 PM

Earguy: I work with a girl who came in with a " really powerful magnet" bracelet that was supposed to ease her pain. It wouldn't even stick to a file cabinet.


She was obviously referring to its spiritual power.
 
2011-11-07 12:40:34 PM
And no amount of evidence will convince my mother that magnetic bracelets, magnetic water, and magnets in general don't help a person undergoing radiation therapy for cancer, since her dad didn't lose all his hair and the cancer went into remission quickly.

It's a wonder I'm sane given all the woo I was exposed to growing up. I wonder if I just overloaded on it early and started demanding evidence before believing anything.

I still have her old crystal therapy book, as well as my own books on herbal remedies (some, like lavender, are not so bupkis).

It's good to have them on hand, just to peruse occasionally, even though I don't believe rose quartz has healing properties.

I keep them for the same reason I have various religious texts.
 
2011-11-07 12:41:02 PM

Humean_Nature: FTFA: When asked if his bracelets are based on solid science, Russakoff pointed to thousands of positive testimonials his company receives.

"Whether or not that would be a scientific proof or not for someone, that's up to the individual to determine," Russakoff said.

If these guys would just come out and say, "some people think it works, you should try it for yourself," I'd be fine with it. Let people waste their money. But the idea that it's up to the individual to decide if thousands of unsourced anecdotes constitute scientific proof is giving me an ulcer right now. It's so stupid....it's not even wrong.


The plural of anecdote is not data...and lots of bad data doesn't equal good data. Some people don't understand that.
 
2011-11-07 12:41:10 PM

walkerhound: FTA: "I think it's premised on pseudoscience," Dr. Narda Robinson of Colorado State University said."

Lulz, as a vet at CSU, I encourage you all to look up Narda Robinson.

/pot meet kettle.



What do you mean? I Googled her and I got this excellent article of her calling bullshiat on homeopathy for animals. Seems like she's likely to be on the right side of this kind of junk. Is there something I'm missing?
 
2011-11-07 12:42:33 PM

RoosterCogburn: Luke raped Laura


Was Laura one of the Ewoks?
 
2011-11-07 12:42:41 PM

meat0918: I keep them for the same reason I have various religious texts.


To hook up with chicks who believe in weird stuff?
 
2011-11-07 12:43:11 PM
TFA: radio frequencies embedded in holographic stickers

lolwut?
 
2011-11-07 12:44:28 PM

walkerhound: FTA: "I think it's premised on pseudoscience," Dr. Narda Robinson of Colorado State University said."

Lulz, as a vet at CSU, I encourage you all to look up Narda Robinson.

/pot meet kettle.


http://csuvets.colostate.edu/pain/Robinson.htm

From above link: "Fellow, American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, 2002"

Oh for fark's sake. Now we have frauds condemning other frauds. Super. Can we kill a lot of people now?
 
2011-11-07 12:45:04 PM

AbbeySomeone: f people believe it will work, it will.


I hate those f people. Bunch of delusional idiots.
 
2011-11-07 12:45:07 PM

RoosterCogburn: Hitler was a Jew


Hitler wasn't Jewish, I know you weren't serious for some of those, but someone might read and believe that.


Interesting enough though, cynicism itself is subject to a number of logical fallacies should you believe it the best method. Confirmation Bias is probably the biggest, then again everyone falls into that one so eh.
 
2011-11-07 12:47:38 PM
"No thanks, i have a hard time believing any significant medical breakthrough is being sold at a mall kiosk."
 
2011-11-07 12:48:13 PM

meat0918: And no amount of evidence will convince my mother that magnetic bracelets, magnetic water, and magnets in general don't help a person undergoing radiation therapy for cancer, since her dad didn't lose all his hair and the cancer went into remission quickly


Hell, even most doctors will tell you that chemo these days doesn't have to mean losing your hair and, if it's going to work, will be noticable quickly.

My dad didn't lose his hair until the 3rd round of chemo, and that was for a cancer with 100% mortality that was caught very late and was in just about the wort place imaginable for that specific type of cancer.
 
2011-11-07 12:48:29 PM

Theeng: Confirmation Bias is probably the biggest, then again everyone falls into that one so eh.


I see what you did there...

/maybe unintentionally, but I lol'd.
 
2011-11-07 12:48:50 PM

mongbiohazard: walkerhound: FTA: "I think it's premised on pseudoscience," Dr. Narda Robinson of Colorado State University said."

Lulz, as a vet at CSU, I encourage you all to look up Narda Robinson.

/pot meet kettle.


What do you mean? I Googled her and I got this excellent article of her calling bullshiat on homeopathy for animals. Seems like she's likely to be on the right side of this kind of junk. Is there something I'm missing?


Yeah, she bills herself as a medical acupunctureist (new window) claiming to heal people by sticking needles in their skin.
 
2011-11-07 12:49:11 PM
Scoff all you want, but I have boundless energy now on a daily basis.
Plus my dick is 3 inches bigger
 
2011-11-07 12:50:15 PM
We're all supposd to learn basic science in school, and yet we're all still so ****ing stupid. Maybe science textbooks need a chapter called "Magnets: Freaky But Not Magic."
 
2011-11-07 12:50:31 PM

dannit724: mongbiohazard: walkerhound: FTA: "I think it's premised on pseudoscience," Dr. Narda Robinson of Colorado State University said."

Lulz, as a vet at CSU, I encourage you all to look up Narda Robinson.

/pot meet kettle.


What do you mean? I Googled her and I got this excellent article of her calling bullshiat on homeopathy for animals. Seems like she's likely to be on the right side of this kind of junk. Is there something I'm missing?

Yeah, she bills herself as a medical acupunctureist (new window) claiming to heal people by sticking needles in their skin.


Are those needles connected to a small volume of medically-useful fluid which is injected into the tissue through said needle?
 
2011-11-07 12:50:49 PM

dannit724: Oh for fark's sake. Now we have frauds condemning other frauds. Super. Can we kill a lot of people now?


With two "selected publications" from the American Journal of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine.

What is this I don't even
 
2011-11-07 12:51:44 PM

Theeng: RoosterCogburn: Hitler was a Jew

Hitler wasn't Jewish, I know you weren't serious for some of those, but someone might read and believe that.


Interesting enough though, cynicism itself is subject to a number of logical fallacies should you believe it the best method. Confirmation Bias is probably the biggest, then again everyone falls into that one so eh.


Link

It's disputable if he was part Jewish, but the man himself was not. I blame the caffeine for not making me clearer. The jewish caffeine.
 
2011-11-07 12:52:15 PM

Cyno01: "No thanks, i have a hard time believing any significant medical breakthrough is being sold at a mall kiosk."


I rarely go to malls, so I hadn't seen them anywhere except on the internet. When I saw the entire kiosk setup, I probably got weird look on my face. The guy slinging that horseshiat started walking over, offering me a bracelet to try on, and I accidentally laughed in his face. I really didn't mean to, and felt a little bad about it.

Not terribly bad, you understand. But a little.
 
2011-11-07 12:52:33 PM
gem stones, titanium mylar, volcanic ash or radio frequencies embedded in holographic stickers...

So many options. Well, the Wand Chooses the Wizard, that's the science here.
 
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