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(Globe and Mail)   How could I have known my husband was a violent offender? Other than the murder conviction, I mean   (theglobeandmail.com) divider line 137
    More: Asinine, psychiatric assessment, romantic relationship, Peterborough, character flaws, sex offenders, dangerous offender, parole board  
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7054 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Oct 2011 at 1:54 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-10-11 11:10:34 AM
Her last name is Moroney.
 
2011-10-11 11:15:34 AM
One night, after a heated argument, Jason lost control and killed her. Corrections experts later chalked his crime up to "adolescent rage."


Bullshiat
 
2011-10-11 11:27:48 AM
Love isn't just blind, it's stupid too.
 
2011-10-11 11:42:40 AM
Oh. Canadian broad. Well, there you go. That explains everything.
 
2011-10-11 12:07:37 PM
Over the almost two-hour interrogation, I got the distinct impression that the officer was looking for signs that I was weak, delusional, manipulated or abused

Possibly, definitely, likely, perhaps.
 
2011-10-11 12:45:36 PM

Speaker2Animals: Over the almost two-hour interrogation, I got the distinct impression that the officer was looking for signs that I was weak, delusional, manipulated or abused

Possibly, definitely, likely, perhaps.


Curious isn't it? It's not as if she married a guy who murdered his lover and then kidnapped and assaulted two women in their house a month after they were married, as soon as she left town.
The spelling of her last name has too many letters.
 
2011-10-11 01:58:04 PM
"Adolescent Rage"? Is that in the same family of complete BS phenomena as "Roid Rage"?
 
2011-10-11 02:00:12 PM

Speaker2Animals: Over the almost two-hour interrogation, I got the distinct impression that the officer was looking for signs that I was weak, delusional, manipulated or abused

Possibly, definitely, likely, perhaps.


Except...everything else in the article, including the responses of others including his psychologist and parole officer doesn't seem to back up that assessment. In point of fact, your statement seems to be exactly the sort of thing she wrote the article to address. So...are you simply stupid, ignorant, incapable of rational thought in response to provided information, or trolling?
 
2011-10-11 02:01:36 PM
my god she really is that dumb...
 
2011-10-11 02:01:48 PM
One night, after a heated argument, Jason lost control and killed her. Corrections experts later chalked his crime up to "adolescent rage."

Translation: his parents were wealthy or connected.
 
2011-10-11 02:03:50 PM

LowbrowDeluxe: Speaker2Animals: Over the almost two-hour interrogation, I got the distinct impression that the officer was looking for signs that I was weak, delusional, manipulated or abused

Possibly, definitely, likely, perhaps.

Except...everything else in the article, including the responses of others including his psychologist and parole officer doesn't seem to back up that assessment. In point of fact, your statement seems to be exactly the sort of thing she wrote the article to address. So...are you simply stupid, ignorant, incapable of rational thought in response to provided information, or trolling?


I wouldn't be so quick to accept her version of events. For example, I am a psychiatrist, and I'm quite confident that every report would suggest that a previous violent episode has a moderate-to-high recidivism rate, and that one should always exercise caution in feeling "safe".

Chalking up a violent argument to "adolescent rage" is a very non-medical term. She likely read what she wanted to read, and was encouraged to do so by someone who was so manipulative that he was able to fool more than just her.
 
2011-10-11 02:03:55 PM

generallyso: One night, after a heated argument, Jason lost control and killed her. Corrections experts later chalked his crime up to "adolescent rage."

Translation: his parents were wealthy or connected.


...and white.
 
2011-10-11 02:07:39 PM
...and white.

it's in canada...

and i love how she blames the "lack of a support system" for the fact that he reoffended. maybe if they'd locked him up for life, then he wouldn't have reoffended.
 
2011-10-11 02:07:55 PM
I'm at a loss to say just how dumb this woman is. "But he looked great and gentle to me". So does a grizzly when it's sleeping.
 
2011-10-11 02:08:11 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2011-10-11 02:08:46 PM
I couldn't believe what I was hearing. This was a handsome, intelligent, gentle man in front of me, not what I imagined when I thought of a "murderer." His remorse was palpable and I found my heart going out to him just as it did for his victim.
OK, sure, people can be remorseful for their crime.
Visit after visit, what I saw before me was a man who was ashamed and filled with remorse. I had the opportunity to see that there was still a human being behind Jason's monstrous acts. His willingness to take responsibility released me from holding onto anger and resentment - a life sentence that I didn't deserve - and helped me open the door to forgiveness and a positive future.
Honey, he's not remorseful. He's a psychopath capable of faking it.
 
2011-10-11 02:09:36 PM

LowbrowDeluxe: Except...everything else in the article, including the responses of others including his psychologist and parole officer doesn't seem to back up that assessment. In point of fact, your statement seems to be exactly the sort of thing she wrote the article to address. So...are you simply stupid, ignorant, incapable of rational thought in response to provided information, or trolling?



Here's the very, very important caveat that you left out: "according to her".

To me TFA read like one long, complicated, rationalization.
 
2011-10-11 02:09:37 PM
One stupid woman.
 
2011-10-11 02:09:37 PM
I don't let anyone around my growing family without a background check.
 
2011-10-11 02:10:48 PM

proteus_b: my god she really is that dumb...


I had to read the first few paragraphs before my brain just said no. She actually said that she "could not have known, there were no signs." And then in the next paragraph she talked about their first date when He said He was on parole for murder. I mean.... She actually said that... out loud... and she believes it inside. I now completly understand this scene from Billy Madison.

farm7.static.flickr.com
 
2011-10-11 02:11:10 PM

Land Ark: I don't let anyone around my growing family without a background check.


I hate that lady.
 
2011-10-11 02:11:29 PM
and yet....less then 5 years after her first husband goes nuts and kidnaps and rapes two women... she is already "happily" married again. WTF? really lady? Never mind that it would take at least 1 year for any normal guy to even think of dating you and for you to be legally divorced....Never mind that through the whole trial and everything else you kept visiting him and talking to him and such.. you must have been a complete emotional wreck.. and yet... you are somehow already married again?

Yeah... good luck to your current husband, I hope he sleeps with one eye open
 
2011-10-11 02:11:46 PM
That's lots of words about feelings and stuff. Here it is condensed:

I was attracted to him, but was a murderer with sex crime overtones. I took the word of a couple government workers that he was legit. He was not. He is incarcerated now. I need validation and closure, so I write profusely about it in hopes of a book / movie deal.
 
2011-10-11 02:12:09 PM

Flavivirus: Chalking up a violent argument to "adolescent rage" is a very non-medical term. She likely read what she wanted to read, and was encouraged to do so by someone who was so manipulative that he was able to fool more than just her.


Except that's kind of the point of the article. 5 years out, no signs, well loved by friends and community, 2 and a half years dating before they got married. It's textbook 'he was always such a nice boy' or 'He's such a fine upstanding pillar of the community, I refuse to believe he beats his wife'. And yet when it does come out, as she says in the article, the vast majority of people start harping on how they would have known better, or clearly she's delusional or naive.

I do agree that violent offenders always have a chance of re-offending, and yes 'adolescent rage' seems pretty specious as an argument. 18 year old living with and in a sexual relationship with a woman 20 years his senior...there was definitely some issues there to start with, I'm guessing. But I'm not debating whether hindsight says he was probably a risk. I'm debating people making exactly the sort of assessment of her judgement that she talks about, given that apparently her assessment was shared by not just authorities willing to parole him from a life sentence, but the community at large.
 
2011-10-11 02:12:25 PM

AbbeySomeone: Her last name is Moroney.


1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2011-10-11 02:12:29 PM
Do the crime AND the time people should forgive and forget. He had not finished his time. More than the wife were at fault for not keeping a closer eye on that situation.
 
2011-10-11 02:12:50 PM
FTA:
"Conventional justice sends the message to victims and society that we should all be satisfied and healed by retribution. Our government tells us that longer sentences and bigger prisons will make us safer. By contrast, my experience tells me that treatment, education and accountability programs for offenders do more good at less cost. Had Jason had access to these, perhaps he never would have reoffended."

Also FTA: he had parole officers, a house, a job, and was studying what he wanted to in a college. Seriously it is painful how dumb some people are. This dude was evil. A bad guy. Yes, he managed to make a few years without raping and killing anyone. That you know of.

"I believe that the ripple effect of crime can be stopped by allocating resources to support victims and offenders' families. And by uncovering and treating crime's root causes, such as abuse and mental illness, we will come much closer to the safe and just society we universally desire."

This is true, exactly true. The solution to the problem is to give you money because you married a murderer. I don't blame your ex-friends who blame you for endangering them. You are indeed deserving of your name.
 
2011-10-11 02:14:38 PM
Look at her eyes in pic2. She is the one that looks like a murderer
 
2011-10-11 02:16:10 PM
What's her TF handle? I know she posts in the political threads, I just know it.
 
2011-10-11 02:18:29 PM

ceejayoz: Honey, he's not remorseful. He's a psychopath capable of faking it.



Yup. I had a friend who dated someone who had done some time for beating the shiat out of his ex-wife. She insisted that there was more to the story, he was really really sorry for what had happened, he would never really do that, he was actually such a nice guy... blah blah blah...

We were concerned that it was bad enough he'd actually gone to jail for it, and were concerned that she was taking this way too lightly. What did she expect him to say before he got into her pants? That the biatch had it coming? Of COURSE he was going to tell her all the shiat he told her and she should really think twice about continuing a relationship with this guy.

So, not long after they met he moved in with her and I'll give you one guess what happened next....
 
2011-10-11 02:18:55 PM

simonbarfsinister: Do the crime AND the time people should forgive and forget. He had not finished his time. More than the wife were at fault for not keeping a closer eye on that situation.


Society can forgive if you do the time but if you're saying that an individual has an obligation to forgive and forget after a murderer gets out of jail and not take that in to consideration before they start dating that person is nieve.
 
2011-10-11 02:20:02 PM

mongbiohazard: So, not long after they met he moved in with her and I'll give you one guess what happened next...


He fixed the cable?
 
2011-10-11 02:21:03 PM

H31N0US: That's lots of words about feelings and stuff. Here it is condensed:

I was attracted to him, but was a murderer with sex crime overtones. I took the word of a couple government workers that he was legit. He was not. He is incarcerated now. I need validation and closure, so I write profusely about it in hopes of a book / movie deal.


Yes, and continue to blame society and the 'system' to divert attention from me.
He kidnapped those women 1 month after they were married - when she was out of town, and abused them in the house she shared him.
Green River Killer was married most of the time he was murdering prostitutes.

Moroney's attitude is one of the reasons I dropped out of social work.
 
2011-10-11 02:21:52 PM

mongbiohazard: ceejayoz: Honey, he's not remorseful. He's a psychopath capable of faking it.


Yup. I had a friend who dated someone who had done some time for beating the shiat out of his ex-wife. She insisted that there was more to the story, he was really really sorry for what had happened, he would never really do that, he was actually such a nice guy... blah blah blah...

We were concerned that it was bad enough he'd actually gone to jail for it, and were concerned that she was taking this way too lightly. What did she expect him to say before he got into her pants? That the biatch had it coming? Of COURSE he was going to tell her all the shiat he told her and she should really think twice about continuing a relationship with this guy.

So, not long after they met he moved in with her and I'll give you one guess what happened next....


They lived a long, happy, abuse free life together, right? He saved kittens and children and volunteered to at the women's shelter?

That's gotta be it!

I wonder how much of "everyone loved him" was because she didn't want to hear it when they didn't
 
2011-10-11 02:24:32 PM

LowbrowDeluxe: Flavivirus: Chalking up a violent argument to "adolescent rage" is a very non-medical term. She likely read what she wanted to read, and was encouraged to do so by someone who was so manipulative that he was able to fool more than just her.

Except that's kind of the point of the article. 5 years out, no signs, well loved by friends and community, 2 and a half years dating before they got married. It's textbook 'he was always such a nice boy' or 'He's such a fine upstanding pillar of the community, I refuse to believe he beats his wife'. And yet when it does come out, as she says in the article, the vast majority of people start harping on how they would have known better, or clearly she's delusional or naive.

I do agree that violent offenders always have a chance of re-offending, and yes 'adolescent rage' seems pretty specious as an argument. 18 year old living with and in a sexual relationship with a woman 20 years his senior...there was definitely some issues there to start with, I'm guessing. But I'm not debating whether hindsight says he was probably a risk. I'm debating people making exactly the sort of assessment of her judgement that she talks about, given that apparently her assessment was shared by not just authorities willing to parole him from a life sentence, but the community at large.


The interesting thing is that her whole article is about how people need to discredit and undermine her, and discount any idea that they could have been fooled, in order to feel safe. And the first (and majority of) comments in this thread prove her 100% right.

Look, not everyone is an idiot, and sometimes people can be fooled. It happens. It can happen to you too.
 
2011-10-11 02:24:48 PM

maxximillian: simonbarfsinister: Do the crime AND the time people should forgive and forget. He had not finished his time. More than the wife were at fault for not keeping a closer eye on that situation.

Society can forgive if you do the time but if you're saying that an individual has an obligation to forgive and forget after a murderer gets out of jail and not take that in to consideration before they start dating that person is nieve.


There are some murders that can almost be justified ie - self defense, a threat to family or loved ones, etc. This guy murdered a sexual partner and that is different. Very few that act out violence against women and children truly change.
 
2011-10-11 02:27:54 PM

LowbrowDeluxe: Flavivirus: Chalking up a violent argument to "adolescent rage" is a very non-medical term. She likely read what she wanted to read, and was encouraged to do so by someone who was so manipulative that he was able to fool more than just her.

Except that's kind of the point of the article. 5 years out, no signs, well loved by friends and community, 2 and a half years dating before they got married. It's textbook 'he was always such a nice boy' or 'He's such a fine upstanding pillar of the community, I refuse to believe he beats his wife'. And yet when it does come out, as she says in the article, the vast majority of people start harping on how they would have known better, or clearly she's delusional or naive.

I do agree that violent offenders always have a chance of re-offending, and yes 'adolescent rage' seems pretty specious as an argument. 18 year old living with and in a sexual relationship with a woman 20 years his senior...there was definitely some issues there to start with, I'm guessing. But I'm not debating whether hindsight says he was probably a risk. I'm debating people making exactly the sort of assessment of her judgement that she talks about, given that apparently her assessment was shared by not just authorities willing to parole him from a life sentence, but the community at large.


I see what you're saying. However,

#1 - we don't know what the reports really said
#2 - there is a risk of being fooled by anyone capable of being murdered, and most examinations would include that

My point being, there is no reason to doubt whether or not she was fooled, but there is plenty of reason to suggest that she manipulated herself because of love too.

Also, it's generally good dating practice to not date anyone who's committed murder in a "rage".
 
2011-10-11 02:30:11 PM
Hey, is this the thread where we justify guilt by association?

/ How about the the inverse of it? "Hey, that woman is married to a rich guy! she must be a good person!"
 
2011-10-11 02:31:34 PM
Reminds me of that Fark story a year or two ago about some prospective politician who had a murder rap on his record and was getting bad press about it. His campaign manager gave an interview and literally described his conviction as just a, and I quote, "blip on the radar."
 
2011-10-11 02:32:44 PM

MycroftHolmes: The interesting thing is that her whole article is about how people need to discredit and undermine her, and discount any idea that they could have been fooled, in order to feel safe. And the first (and majority of) comments in this thread prove her 100% right.


How? I dont think a single person in this thread has any reason to feel threatened by this murderer as I doubt any of us have met him. We can still point out that her sad attempt at selling a book is just a sad attempt at selling a book.

I almost wonder if she went into the relationship HOPING for that effect from him just so she could write a book about it, maybe she even controlled and manipulated him into doing these deeds and still controls and manipulates him to this day... not many people tell their lawyer not to fight the dangerous offended designation.


Like I said... her current husband better sleep with one eye open.
 
2011-10-11 02:33:10 PM
simonbarfsinister... More than the wife were at fault for not keeping a closer eye on that situation.

And just why would the wife have any culpability in his criimes;he totally snowed her with his psychotic personality
and then took the first free moment he had to revert to his normal self when she was away.
Delusional maybe but in no way is she culpable
 
2011-10-11 02:33:41 PM

Flavivirus: LowbrowDeluxe: Flavivirus: Chalking up a violent argument to "adolescent rage" is a very non-medical term. She likely read what she wanted to read, and was encouraged to do so by someone who was so manipulative that he was able to fool more than just her.

Except that's kind of the point of the article. 5 years out, no signs, well loved by friends and community, 2 and a half years dating before they got married. It's textbook 'he was always such a nice boy' or 'He's such a fine upstanding pillar of the community, I refuse to believe he beats his wife'. And yet when it does come out, as she says in the article, the vast majority of people start harping on how they would have known better, or clearly she's delusional or naive.

I do agree that violent offenders always have a chance of re-offending, and yes 'adolescent rage' seems pretty specious as an argument. 18 year old living with and in a sexual relationship with a woman 20 years his senior...there was definitely some issues there to start with, I'm guessing. But I'm not debating whether hindsight says he was probably a risk. I'm debating people making exactly the sort of assessment of her judgement that she talks about, given that apparently her assessment was shared by not just authorities willing to parole him from a life sentence, but the community at large.

I see what you're saying. However,

#1 - we don't know what the reports really said
#2 - there is a risk of being fooled by anyone capable of being murdered, and most examinations would include that

My point being, there is no reason to doubt whether or not she was fooled, but there is plenty of reason to suggest that she manipulated herself because of love too.

Also, it's generally good dating practice to not date anyone who's committed murder in a "rage".


But he was young and foolish and their situation is different. He married her afterall and that makes everything better.
 
2011-10-11 02:36:55 PM

H31N0US: mongbiohazard: So, not long after they met he moved in with her and I'll give you one guess what happened next...

He fixed the cable?


They filmed a porno?
 
2011-10-11 02:39:17 PM

kvinesknows: How? I dont think a single person in this thread has any reason to feel threatened by this murderer as I doubt any of us have met him.


Well, it's a good thing you don't know any other human beings on the planet then so you never ever have to worry about being fooled by people. Here's the thing. If you can't reason out that the situation described might apply to a wider range of encounters, with the same need/desire to self-validate through judgement of others, I'm probably going to question your vociferous denial.
 
2011-10-11 02:41:43 PM
Interesting...

1. She's an inmate's advocate now? That's... Awkward.
2. Married again already? Yikes.
3. Obviously writing to get through her thoughts / defend herself. Nothing wrong with that.
4. It's POSSIBLE there were no signs. It CAN happen.
5. Is it LIKELY? Impossible to tell from her writing.
6. It's DEFINITE that this is written to drum up interest in her book.
7. Um. What happened to the two women?
 
2011-10-11 02:42:18 PM

AbbeySomeone: maxximillian: simonbarfsinister: Do the crime AND the time people should forgive and forget. He had not finished his time. More than the wife were at fault for not keeping a closer eye on that situation.

Society can forgive if you do the time but if you're saying that an individual has an obligation to forgive and forget after a murderer gets out of jail and not take that in to consideration before they start dating that person is nieve.

There are some murders that can almost be justified ie - self defense, a threat to family or loved ones, etc. This guy murdered a sexual partner and that is different. Very few that act out violence against women and children truly change.


If it's a justified killing then it is NOT murder.
 
2011-10-11 02:44:53 PM
FTA: Jason encouraged me to meet privately with his parole officer and psychologist, and they quelled any concern that Jason would reoffend. They said he was their "best guy." They believed he was rehabilitated. Official reports and psychiatric assessments echoed their confidence.

FTA: By contrast, my experience tells me that treatment, education and accountability programs for offenders do more good at less cost. Had Jason had access to these, perhaps he never would have reoffended.


First she says he had a psychologist and psychiatric assessments. Then she says he never had treatment. Which is it, lady?
 
2011-10-11 02:46:52 PM
Dolt.
 
2011-10-11 02:51:10 PM
Fark this woman right in the ear. She is making money on the suffering of those other two women that her violent/rapist/murderer ex husband tied up and tortured in her basement during fun-time weekend away from Mommy. She's posing and SMILING with him all cuddled up in the waiting room. Writing to defend herself? She's digging herself deeper to sell BOOKS. She's nearly as bad as he is. Sicko.
 
2011-10-11 02:58:12 PM

Speaker2Animals: Over the almost two-hour interrogation, I got the distinct impression that the officer was looking for signs that I was weak, delusional, manipulated or abused

Possibly, definitely, likely, perhaps.


Hey, you left off the last part of the quote: "and maybe even an accomplice."

The cops don't particularly care if she was weak, delusional or manipulated. They do care if she was the victim of a crime. What they really cared about though was finding out if she was an accomplice. After all, at the point they questioned her, they had the two victims and a voluntary confession from hubby. (That's a pretty darn good case). What they were after was more evidence, some more evidence of his guilt, but really more evidence to help them decide whether or not the Mrs., was complicit or merely delusional.
 
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