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(Some Homeless Dude)   Landlord raises rent 250% retroactive to the first of the month in the only state left operating at a surplus   (minotdailynews.com) divider line 176
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23261 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Oct 2011 at 4:39 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-10-08 06:33:51 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: Two bedrooms and two floors for a little bit more than the cost of a studio apartment out here? Sorry, my tiny fiddle is in the shop.

/apartment managers are dicks


In order to get that they have to live in Minot, ND. Have you ever been to Minot? I have. It's not worth cheap rent to live there.
 
2011-10-08 06:38:25 PM

sheilanagig: Until yesterday, these people were living within their means.


Their housing wasn't being subsidized yesterday?
 
2011-10-08 06:39:00 PM

Occam's Chainsaw: I agree. I'm in a unique position, because I know what my recourse is. Most working poor, something like this comes down on them and they're clueless as to how to proceed. This is the inherent unfairness in our system as implemented - the most vulnerable have the least protections, and the least means of ascertaining what few protections exist.


diaphoresis: Occam's Chainsaw: I agree. I'm in a unique position, because I know what my recourse is. Most working poor, something like this comes down on them and they're clueless as to how to proceed. This is the inherent unfairness in our system as implemented - the most vulnerable have the least protections, and the least means of ascertaining what few protections exist.

I somewhat disagree. Renters should always investigate their rights. If they haven't investigated the landlord-tenant law, they should. I was one of the fortunate teens that was told about the law before I moved into my own place. The ignorance of most renters is lamentable and should be retified.


Truthfully, my state has it so that if a landlord fails to comply with certain parts of the law, the tenant can sue for double damages, court costs and reasonable attorney's fees. While tenants may not know the law, my office does attempt to help them with any issue that is in our purview (which while fairly extensive, is still limited).

It is upsetting when we have to tell people that we don't have any authority in a specific instance, and inform them that no one has any authority in their case. But also, we have people file complaints about things that aren't illegal at all.
 
2011-10-08 06:41:05 PM
A lease transfers with the property, it is not cancelled or changed because there is new ownership. The rent amount can't be changed during the lease, because you can't change the terms of the contract (unless it specifically states so). The residents have until the end of their lease to move with no rent increase. It sounds as if they have a good class-action lawsuit.
 
2011-10-08 06:44:02 PM
I had a landlord once who seemed very nice... then one day he says, "Don't ever trust a landlord; we're evil. Even if we seem nice or polite or accommodating, don't believe it... because we're not. We're evil. Every last one of us. Remember that..."

Bottom line is... he was absolutely right. Never forget it.
 
2011-10-08 06:45:22 PM

sallys: It sounds as if they have a good class-action lawsuit.


Poor people generally see lawyers and courts as the enemy... because they usually are.
 
2011-10-08 06:45:42 PM
If the company that bought these units wants to raise rates, they are more than free to. But it does get tiring to hear BS out of companies like this. Just tell the truth already; you want to make more money on the apartments, and your best shot at it is to get the people currently living there to move out. Raising rates like that is clearly intended to motivate them out.
 
2011-10-08 06:47:17 PM

diaphoresis: I somewhat disagree. Renters should always investigate their rights. If they haven't investigated the landlord-tenant law, they should.


In a perfect world, they'd have perfect knowledge. That's still not disagreeing with me. What I said was, "the most vulnerable have the least protections, and the least means of ascertaining what few protections exist". Yes, you and I are intelligent enough to know what rights we have, or where to look if we don't know. We most likely have the time and the means to do so. But that doesn't apply to all the poor, or even a large percentage.
 
2011-10-08 06:48:20 PM

diaphoresis: /You're clueless


And you're playing the avoidance game. Nobody's expecting an exact timeline. What you're being asked is an insight as to how people that are able to make ends meet, and find themselves unable to do so within less than one month, are expected to "make plans" and "prepare", when confronted with a more than double rent, all the while considering other bills will not stop coming in, food still needs to be bought, cars will need to be filled with gas, and made ready for the infamous ND winter.

The answer is that you can't, because you are clueless regarding the financial state of most people in this state, who have to live paycheck to paycheck.

Just up and moving is financially impossible; even if the landlord is being stalled (with good faith payments of existing rent), that'll fly for no more than two months in a row, if said landlord decides to turn the oh hai u owe us moniez backwardz into sorry, consider this your 30 day notice, chum, which is most probably what this particular situation is going to turn into.

You are making it sound too easy. Not everybody (or better: hardly anybody in this state) has the capability of just moving on and out.
 
2011-10-08 06:48:28 PM
img687.imageshack.us
 
2011-10-08 06:50:18 PM
This is how detached the 1% are from reality. They think everybody buys their bullshiat for raising the rent over double, they claim their going to improve the apartments with the increase.

Sounds like bullshiat to me.

How about you FIRST improve them, THEN raise the rent and see who finds them worthy value wise by deciding to stay?
 
2011-10-08 06:52:36 PM
$485 to $1100 isn't a 250% increase, it's a 126% increase.
 
2011-10-08 07:02:01 PM

Hoopy Frood: $485 to $1100 isn't a 250% increase, it's a 126% increase.


126, 250...whatever it takes.
 
2011-10-08 07:05:43 PM
Sounds like some cocksucker is trying to fleece the hoopleheads.
 
2011-10-08 07:08:50 PM

CaptainSmartass: Sounds like some cocksucker is trying to fleece the hoopleheads.


The local cocksuckers are territorial, and they were here doing the fleecing first, so I'm guessing that is the only reason it made the local paper. Their town, their hoopleheads.
 
2011-10-08 07:11:51 PM
Link (new window)
 
2011-10-08 07:27:00 PM
In Adelaide, Australia, by including a clause stating that rent may be increased during the term of an agreement in the original documents (which all real estate agents include, and they just bin your app if you object to it), rent can be increased during a fixed-term agreement, ie. six months into a twelve month agreement, they can increase your rent. You have no right to refuse the increase, and cannot move out if you object. You can break-lease, in which case you are liable for agents fees and all rent up until they find another tenant. This was done to me. A few months after moving into a new place, they upped the rent and put it on the market, meaning I had to deal with complete strangers coming to my place on a regular basis (every weekend and twice a week is considered legally acceptable), whilst paying more rent than was originally agreed for the privilege. When I asked around as to what I could do, I was basically told that the only thing I could do is try to show that the rent increase was unreasonable, and there is no hard threshold on what sort of increase is and isn't unreasonable. They mentioned it would be hard to do without access to the landlords financial affairs.

I'm sure someone will tell me that I should have read what I signed, and insisted on getting the clause removed. I agree completely. I did this for a while, and attempted to "negotiate" reasonable terms. Every single app of mine was binned, and eventually, I had to find a place to live.

I'll dig up the specific legislature if anyone is curious about it.

I'm thankful the increase wasn't in the order of 100% to 250% though. Much less than that.

But yeah. Retroactive rent increases, or rent increases without the ability to refuse and move out? Completely unreasonable, and apparently in many places, completely legal.
 
2011-10-08 07:28:24 PM

Notabunny: domo_kun_sai: Minot is a very small city. It sounds like this developer has plans for this property. He (it) has to know that raising the rent that much, that fast, will cause most people to move. I think someone should call a lawyer.

It's easier to repaint and install new carpet in a vacant unit.


The developers sound like truly awful people. I wonder where they're from.
 
2011-10-08 07:33:50 PM
I like it when people say things like "don't like? just move!" See, in fly over country, there's nowhere else to go. The next town with job or available housing can be 100 miles away and they might not have both at the same time. There are no trains or subways to get you there and back. Winter comes, and even if there's 5 feet of snow on the ground, you're still expected to go on with life. So, it's not like someone can have a far commute because "I can't get there because the road is closed because of snow" doesn't really fly.

My mom rents a 3 bedroom, 1 bath house up in the Dakotas for little more than $500/month. That's pretty standard. Most people don't make much. Even the people with good factory jobs pretty much top out around $14/hr. Cost of living differs, but wages and housing costs are pretty much proportionate to what they are in other areas of the country.
 
2011-10-08 07:35:51 PM

JohnnyC: I had a landlord once who seemed very nice... then one day he says, "Don't ever trust a landlord; we're evil. Even if we seem nice or polite or accommodating, don't believe it... because we're not. We're evil. Every last one of us. Remember that..."
Bottom line is... he was absolutely right. Never forget it.


shiat, tenants are evil. I'd never be a landlord, because people DO NOT give a fark about things that don't belong to them. After they trash someone else's property, they just move on to the next sucker.
 
2011-10-08 07:41:39 PM
In CA, you can't even rent a ROOM for $485. It sucks what's happening to these folks. I have a 500 sqft apartment in a decent neighborhood, and I pay $845 plus utilities. No section 8 either...
 
2011-10-08 07:47:49 PM

diaphoresis: If you can't afford $1100 a month to live in a decent place, move to another city and/or state where you won't get screwed.

/This whole raising rent thing does sound like a subsidy scam tho.


Look at how stupid you are.
 
2011-10-08 07:50:36 PM

sallys: A lease transfers with the property, it is not cancelled or changed because there is new ownership. The rent amount can't be changed during the lease, because you can't change the terms of the contract (unless it specifically states so). The residents have until the end of their lease to move with no rent increase. It sounds as if they have a good class-action lawsuit.


not in Michigan. It's really a contract between 2 sets of people. Not my fault you signed a contract with someone who doesn't own the property anymore. As far a the new owner goes, in Michigan, you can have em all in the street in 7 days.

/i did this for my parents
//just pay the dam rent on time, this is all that matters
///the mortgage needs to be paid

as far as raising the rent...the market must support it or these guys are dumb.
 
2011-10-08 08:06:41 PM

Muffin2011: In CA, you can't even rent a ROOM for $485. It sucks what's happening to these folks. I have a 500 sqft apartment in a decent neighborhood, and I pay $845 plus utilities. No section 8 either...


You don't look in the right area, I had 30 rentals in california I had efficiencies for $375, 1 bedrooms for $425 and 2 bedrooms for $550 without electric, all in San Dimus California, not ghetto motels either.

I now have 60 rentals in central FL with pretty much the same prices, although they do need an upgrade in the kitchen area (15 yr old cabinets) and new tiling done on the floor, otherwise I have people ask me all the time why the rent is so cheap - best explanation I have is I prefer to fill the apartments up then raise the rent. Now here is the deal, I don't raise the rent for tenants already moved in, I do this because long as they pay rent I have not lost money in the process of having the apartment empty, now once all the apartments are rented and someone moves out, I will adjust the rent for someone new (perhaps raise it $100 a month) the main reason is the maintenance cost of upkeeping 60 rental units.

I do the work by myself, I once had a staff of 9, but fired everyone except 3 which are maintenance personel and someone to answer phone calls.

Far as those who complain about landlords - we are not evil, our job is to be accommodating and if things break there is a grace period in which it should be fixed - serious issues are delt with right away, but for example if your light bulb burns out - don't be a dick and call us at 2am to fix it.

However, I have came across managers that can be some shady farks, trying to raise rent so they can pocket it (late fee for rent is one I know of off hand) - when you rent you take a Lease, that lease will tell you what they can charge etc, make sure your not an idiot to sign a 6 month lease and try to move out without looking at the fee for moving before the lease is up, I don't charge one, but my previous apartment I had was $550 if I broke the lease, sure I could of moved out, however you are binded by contract and can be taken to court - in most cases a judge won't even review it and rule the Landlord the entitlement.

However, I truly wish I wasn't in the rental property business, farking people make me sick the way they live, every 1 good tenant I get I have already gone through 9 pieces of shiat.

/Oh and just to piss everyone off, where you are renting right now - someone probably died in your apartment at some point - have a great day :)
 
2011-10-08 08:19:11 PM

sethstorm: Beowoolfie: It's practically raining money in your town. Instead of being one of the people with some actual morals, you want to be the (to-be) dead whore in the Cadillac.

FTFY.

You deserve to have regulations come down on you like a ton of bricks. One can still catch the money without being an asshat about it.


You're putting words in my mouth. Where do you see that I advocated anything immoral or illegal?
 
2011-10-08 08:27:19 PM
While it's likely legal to increase the rent, I highly doubt it's legal to retroactively increase the rent, which is what this landlord has done.
 
2011-10-08 08:40:06 PM
Bad smitty. Article gave no label of what the state even was. Had to Google the town.
 
2011-10-08 08:42:27 PM

badhatharry: How much is the rent? tuition? health care? baby formula? As much as the government will pay.


This. Any references to "Free Market" are null and void.

/That, and there never has been a free market. Free-er, maybe.
 
2011-10-08 08:43:07 PM

AbbeySomeone: 2 stories, 2 br and a basement for 485.00? I realize I'm accustomed to Seattle rents, but damn - that's under market.


Yeah, that sounds pretty cheap to me too. My boyfriend has a 2 bedroom 1.5 bath place that costs over 900 per month... but we also gotta remember that as LacksSocialSkilzz said before, most people live on minimum wage there, or slightly above it. Minimum wage is also a lot lower in ND than it is in Washington or Illinois. Wages are a lot higher in our states. I remember back in Northern Florida (where wages sucked), 3 bedroom 2 bathroom brand new places went for a little over $1000 a month. It is cheap, but you make very little there. Wages are much higher in Chicago as well as Seattle.
 
2011-10-08 08:50:29 PM

diaphoresis: If you can't afford $1100 a month to live in a decent place, move to another city and/or state where you won't get screwed.

/This whole raising rent thing does sound like a subsidy scam tho.


If one can't afford $1100 for a place to live in your own city, what makes you think they can afford to move to a strange town/state at a time when jobs are scarce enough as it is?
 
2011-10-08 08:50:32 PM
This seems fair to me. I live in Minot and mine goes up on average ten to twenty bucks a month. This has gone on for a couple years. It's ok though. With a decent education and some petroleum industry experience, you can get a job starting at $125-150k.
 
2011-10-08 08:52:40 PM

dahmers love zombie: LacksSocialSkilzz: AbbeySomeone: 2 stories, 2 br and a basement for 485.00? I realize I'm accustomed to Seattle rents, but damn - that's under market.

These were subsidized units, low income housing. I know a family in Seattle that pays less than that for a brand-new three bedroom unit with section 8. These units weren't anywhere near as nice. None of the housing is maintained here, because you don't dare to complain. Threats about leaving are empty. There isn't anywhere to go, and even if you did leave, it wouldn't hurt the landlord and he wouldn't have to fix anything. He could turn around and rent it to an oil worker desperate for housing for twice what he charged you. You'd be doing the landlord a favor, and that's the way the landlord intends for it to work. Squeeze the people you aren't making a profit from out of the market.

Ah yes. The retarded cousin of free market capitalism. Provide juuuuust enough state support that the capitalists can assrape the people even worse.


Oh so you mean communism?
 
2011-10-08 08:59:18 PM

LacksSocialSkilzz: After the spring flood, landlords realized there was money to be made from FEMA support, but the biggest issue going on here is that the state is flooded (pun intended) with oil workers... and a cap has been put on mancamps, triggering a higher demand for regular housing by people who can afford ridiculous prices.

Many of us who already live here, and are not in the oil business, have jobs that are just slightly above minimum wage, with an occasional spike to a couple of dollars more... and find themselves unable to live where they've lived their entire lives because of what is nothing but greed. "Hey, all landlords are raising rent, so why shouldn't we?"


Good to see that you admit right off the bat that the problem is not the landlords, but the government regulations, and local busybodies, that prevent adequate supply of housing from reaching the market.

sethstorm: Sounds like a good reason to have robust rental regulations. That is, ones that discourage landlords from acting like this, and financially encourage them to be reasonable.


You do realize that this whole problem is a RESULT of government regulations. (As well as locals who fight the work camps then biatch about rents going up.) The oil companies aren't allowed to setup as many work camps as they need to house their workers so a housing shortage results as they go into the local market to get rental units. How is more regulations for a problem the regulations caused going to be better off than just adjusting the regulation on work camps?

There are two options here, put up with lots of work camps, or put up with sky high rents. The government and locals have chosen to let the working poor pay high rents rather than the alternative of allowing more work camps to be built.

/Oh yea, and if you're thinking rent control you might as well burn the buildings down since that is what happens anyway.
 
2011-10-08 09:17:39 PM
Sounds like a tent concession would be quite profitable.
 
2011-10-08 09:22:33 PM

cryinoutloud: JohnnyC: I had a landlord once who seemed very nice... then one day he says, "Don't ever trust a landlord; we're evil. Even if we seem nice or polite or accommodating, don't believe it... because we're not. We're evil. Every last one of us. Remember that..."
Bottom line is... he was absolutely right. Never forget it.

shiat, tenants are evil. I'd never be a landlord, because people DO NOT give a fark about things that don't belong to them. After they trash someone else's property, they just move on to the next sucker.


I agree with both statements, actually. Lot of greedy, lazy, dirty no-good people on both ends of the rental business.
 
2011-10-08 09:31:44 PM
Two major problems: the landlord can't raise the rent retroactively, and rent can be withheld until repairs are made.
 
2011-10-08 09:39:52 PM

Crosshair: Good to see that you admit right off the bat that the problem is not the landlords, but the government regulations, and local busybodies, that prevent adequate supply of housing from reaching the market.

sethstorm: Sounds like a good reason to have robust rental regulations. That is, ones that discourage landlords from acting like this, and financially encourage them to be reasonable.

You do realize that this whole problem is a RESULT of government regulations. (As well as locals who fight the work camps then biatch about rents going up.) The oil companies aren't allowed to setup as many work camps as they need to house their workers so a housing shortage results as they go into the local market to get rental units. How is more regulations for a problem the regulations caused going to be better off than just adjusting the regulation on work camps?

There are two options here, put up with lots of work camps, or put up with sky high rents. The government and locals have chosen to let the working poor pay high rents rather than the alternative of allowing more work camps to be built.

/Oh yea, and if you're thinking rent control you might as well burn the buildings down since that is what happens anyway.


Oil workers can live in man-camps, yes. They cannot, however, keep their families there. What kind of life is it for someone to live in one place while their family lives in another? The man-camps might work for single men, but not for families.

We just need more housing up here, and the market not to be so captive to the greed of so many crooks. There isn't any alternative right now but to move out of state or pay what they want. A lot of people can't afford either option.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2011-10-08 09:41:35 PM
rent can be withheld until repairs are made.

Is that true in North Dakota? States have different laws. Around here the tenant can trash the place and live rent-free as long as he can break stuff faster than the landlord can fix the damage. Some states say the rent has to go into escrow, which cuts down on abuse of the system.
 
2011-10-08 09:44:26 PM
Jeez. The owners act like they own the building. They must be evil.
 
2011-10-08 09:45:38 PM
If only there were a way to "tax" economic rent and "untax" labor and capital by the same amount.
 
2011-10-08 09:54:48 PM
My real estate lady told me the other day that real estate is like a kiss; it all depends on

LOCATION
LOCATION
LOCATION
 
2011-10-08 09:55:40 PM

ZAZ: rent can be withheld until repairs are made.

Is that true in North Dakota? States have different laws. Around here the tenant can trash the place and live rent-free as long as he can break stuff faster than the landlord can fix the damage. Some states say the rent has to go into escrow, which cuts down on abuse of the system.


One of the recourses the tenant has in North Dakota if the landlord isn't making repairs is to sue him in small claims for the cost of such repairs. Or they can do the repairs themselves and deduct that from the rent. It sounds like, in typical slumlord fashion, the landlord simply reduced the rent as the place fell apart.
 
2011-10-08 09:59:33 PM

MikeMc: Hoopy Frood: $485 to $1100 isn't a 250% increase, it's a 126% increase.

126, 250...whatever it takes.


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2011-10-08 10:02:04 PM

GAT_00: ZAZ: Later in the article, it sounds like the landlord discovered government subsidies would pay for higher rent than he was charging. Much like tuition increases are offset by financial aid.

So he's getting everyone to leave by free marketing them. Nice.


Yes. He is free marketing them right in the ass. And the Invisible Fist doesn't use lube.
 
2011-10-08 10:07:07 PM

Another Government Employee: Sounds like a tent concession would be quite profitable.


this is north dakota. pretty soon it will be very cold. for what seems like a very long time. very cold.
 
2011-10-08 10:20:55 PM
this would be a place where fat girls are more desireable because they are warmer in the winter.
 
2011-10-08 10:47:53 PM

Misconduc: Far as those who complain about landlords - we are not evil, our job is to be accommodating and if things break there is a grace period in which it should be fixed - serious issues are delt with right away, but for example if your light bulb burns out - don't be a dick and call us at 2am to fix it.


Maybe you're not an evil landlord, but they do exist. I've had personal experience with evil landlords.
 
2011-10-08 10:50:18 PM

FerneJohn: Bad smitty. Article gave no label of what the state even was. Had to Google the town.


At the very bottom of the page it says: Minot Daily News
301 4th St SE , Minot, ND 58703.
 
2011-10-08 10:56:32 PM

sheilanagig: Beowoolfie: When your town becomes a "boom town", it's time for you to change, too. The money in a boom town goes to people taking care of the newcomers. Quit your dental hygenist and nursing home jobs and find a service you can perform for the oil workers at inflated wages. (No this is not a sex worker joke).

While you're at it, if Minot still has a library, go check out a book on the California gold rush to look for ideas. Some people got rich providing laundry service to the gold miners...and the dirty laundry was shipped all the way to Hawaii to be cleaned, with a multi-month wait.

It's practically raining money in your town. Instead of being one of the people whining about how quickly things have changed, you want to be one of the people who grab a bucket and go get some!

P.S. If your husband is an electrician, why isn't he already getting rich off the oil workers? Don't all those old abandoned farmhouses I've been hearing about in this thread need electrical improvements?

If everybody quits their nursing home and waiter jobs, there won't be any waiters or CNAs. Do you really want grandma neglected because anyone who knew how or wanted to couldn't live on what it paid? Every able-bodied man with any technical skill went out to work on the rigs, so there's nobody to fix your car or even do something as simple as flipping a burger. Don't look down on the people who do the low paying jobs. We might find we don't like a world without hotel maids and busboys.


Something tells me you've never lived in a boom town.

The service just about everywhere in one sucks.
 
2011-10-08 11:01:14 PM

JohnnyC: I had a landlord once who seemed very nice... then one day he says, "Don't ever trust a landlord; we're evil. Even if we seem nice or polite or accommodating, don't believe it... because we're not. We're evil. Every last one of us. Remember that..."

Bottom line is... he was absolutely right. Never forget it.


I think this is entirely a function of the kinds of tenants a landlord has had to deal with.

That guy who rents his dad's old house to friends of the family for just enough to cover his dad's nursing home, he's going to be a gem of a landlord. That guy who's managed a slew of college town properties for a few decades and seen all sorts of inconsiderate shiat from tenants, sure he'll be an ass.

\And he'll ignore your complaints about the raccoons living in the attic for months until you threaten to report him to the city public health authority.
 
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