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(Daily Mail)   Superpower? America's a Third World country. Look what happened in New York after a damp squib of a hurricane sent the US into panic   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 194
    More: Interesting, America's a Third World, New York, Politics of the United States, the Mail, civil services, council tax, Westchester County, Ralph Lauren  
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19509 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Sep 2011 at 7:47 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-09-05 12:01:13 AM
You know, there's only one thing worse than the media "over hyping" Hurricane Irene...

And that's the morons who keep going on about how the hurricane was over hyped. No it was not the catastrophe to end all catastrophes but there has been billions in damage from North Carolina to Vermont, and about 30-40 people are dead, so how about you just sit over there and be quiet for awhile about the "over hyped" storm?
 
2011-09-05 12:01:31 AM
If infrastructure is paid for by the government, then it's socialism! First Obama takes away my Medicare and now he wants to spend all our money on roads to nowhere!

/Am I doing it right?
 
2011-09-05 12:09:46 AM
Just popping in to say America isn't a Third World country, and will never be. A Third World country is one that remained neutral after the Cold War, rather than allying with NATO or with the Soviets.
 
2011-09-05 12:12:29 AM

larrimo: [www.independent.co.uk image 600x385]

Everyone knows it's "Damp Squid", Jen. What the hell is a squib?


An explosive paint filled bag, used for special effect shots to simulate bullet wounds, or simply a defective fizzy firecracker. Also can be used to describe a short satirical piece of literature. Also can be used to describe a snippet or short footnote, if not a notation of anomalous data that doesn't necessarily suggest a solution.
 
2011-09-05 12:12:58 AM

JungleBoogie: She makes one very good point, in all the whining: That power goes out so easily. I'm close to Bethesda, Maryland, one of the most expensive places in the US. The power reliably goes out with a line of thunderstorms. It's absurd.

So - what's the answer? Concrete poles with a pile-driven steel girder center? In areas with underground power transmission lines, power is pretty rock solid. I've lived in those areas when the last two major tropical systems came through, and I never lost power, much less from a thunderstorm line.

But, if you're going to have above-ground power lines, you need a) poles that don't go down and b) no tree branches within a 15 foot radius.


As someone who's lights didn't even blink near Westminster, MD, I got a kick out of that reply.
 
2011-09-05 12:14:01 AM
This 'guy' sounds like Naomi Wolfe, who last week complained that the government didn't tell her when Hurricane Irene had passed, so that she could go outside with her kids. These are the kind of people who think that we should rely on the government to do everything for us. People should be prepared to live without power and water for a few days.

Only because of our wonderful U.S. satellites did this 'guy' even know this hurricane was coming, saving her from getting whacked whilst out yachting or whatever else she would have been doing outside that day.
 
2011-09-05 12:16:57 AM

larrimo: [www.independent.co.uk image 600x385]

Everyone knows it's "Damp Squid", Jen. What the hell is a squib?


At least she doesn't have to worry about anyone putting her on a Peddle Stool.
 
2011-09-05 12:21:51 AM
Just read TFA... She makes a few different decent points, but they don't correlate at all. It's just an unhinged list of a few observations...

I mean thanks for sharing I guess.
 
2011-09-05 12:25:25 AM
Pestifer

the storm drains don't have adequate redundancy? All that is seriously third-world type reasons for stuff going wrong.

Pestifier, they don't have power poles and storm drains in the third world.
 
2011-09-05 12:28:54 AM
America, welcome to the Daily Mail treatment: Whining editorialising and blinkered reportage that panders to the worst fears and stuck up pretensions of the social climbing and moralising British middle classes.

Needless to say, ask a Briton how well their infrastructure copes with a little snow... (Hint: It makes the Germans I know laugh)

Also, ask an Australian how well their Government coped with cyclone Yasi.
 
2011-09-05 12:43:26 AM
I lived in southern England in the late 80's. We had a winter where several "snowstorms" hit back to back, blanketing the entire south of England with about, oh, 3 inches of snow.

The entire place ground to a halt. Stores, businesses, pubs -- all shut down. Food was airlifted into East Anglia. The taxis in Brighton (where I lived) had chains on their tires. And you're gonna talk to me about poor disaster response and overreacting? Please.
 
2011-09-05 01:04:02 AM
www.gothamgarage.net

I'll make her her britches damp
 
2011-09-05 01:32:45 AM
I so love the squee filled glee some Brits get when America has a problem. I bet he calls America "The colonies" still.

Want to see third world conditions in everyday America?

Head to Detroit for an urban example.

Head into Appalachia for rural examples.
 
2011-09-05 01:34:22 AM
I was not worried about the storm, I was worried about the power going out cause pepco sucks. Im glad I only lost power for 3 hours
 
2011-09-05 01:36:13 AM
Thoroughly With Foil:

"&"

/sure, now you work for me...
 
2011-09-05 01:38:29 AM
Came for the IT Crowd, leaving satisfied.
 
2011-09-05 01:40:21 AM
i.dailymail.co.uk

bittersweetcollide.com
 
2011-09-05 01:45:07 AM
She looks like Terry Jones.
 
2011-09-05 01:51:17 AM

70Ford: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 468x834] [bittersweetcollide.com image 222x313]



LOL
 
2011-09-05 02:09:47 AM
What a load of farking rubbish.

There's no shortage of things to fault the Americans for, but like many things of which they are accused, this isn't one of them. No region that doesn't receive hurricanes (or any other very harsh weather with any expected frequency could be expected to have spent money on full preparation.

It wasn't that long ago when London was shut down for three days by an inch of snow. I think we can give New York a pass on this one.
 
2011-09-05 02:12:08 AM

bad_ed: She looks like Terry Jones.


I hadn't realized how incredibly put-upon she looks in that picture. One can almost imagine her saying "These frightful savages, how can they bear to live in such straits?" in a pre-war Raj sort of way.
 
2011-09-05 02:14:22 AM
I have noticed a very distinct change over the decades concerning hurricane damage and recovery.

As a kid, I sailed through many a hurricane, usually having to put up with the loss of power and phone for a day or two and very minor flooding. Naturally a few trees and a lot of limbs blew down. By the end of the week, everything was pretty well back to normal.

We never needed federal disaster aid. Actually, I'm not sure if there was any and FEMA didn't exist.

By the middle 80's I noticed that every time there was a hurricane, some places got flooded out and pretty well leveled. A few years earlier, stricter building codes had gone into effect. There was more destruction also.

By the end of the 90's it dawned on me that in a lot of these places, massive development had taken place. That cut down on the open land usually used as wind protection and drainage. Houses stacked nearly on top of each other just were begging to get flattened.

Katrina leveled Florida. It did a lot of damage to my city, but then again the population over the years has quadrupled and quadrupled again. Huge stands of wind breaking trees are gone. Natural drainage areas now have houses on them. Other are paved over. The beach area had to be evacuated and closed and suffered massive damage. Naturally. Hurricanes coming ashore hit the barrier island first and massive, expensive developments there have wiped out hundreds of acres of buffering wild woods.

My house had some minor flooding, for the first time ever. It didn't take a genius to figure out why. The 100 or so additional houses in the area, newly built since we moved here, are all required to be built on filled land, meaning they're on small hills.

At the same time, the county stopped requiring the ever present, shallow drainage ditches that used to run in front of every home, to drain into main canals. So, a lot of houses filled them in and planted them with grass.

Water, running off these higher homes had nowhere to go but the streets. Naturally, my home, being built closer to the ground, caught a lot of it. The few swale ditches that remained promptly flooded out trying to handle the massive flow and actually washed out a huge chunk of road. This mass of water found itself blocked from draining into the main canals by the higher banks, which had no drains cut into them.

One guy on a back street, plugged the still open swale ditch for his neighborhood by filling it in with dirt to create a driveway for his massive 4x4 pickup truck. He didn't bother putting a drain pipe in first.

At a low corner, where a part of a ditch still functioned and led to a pipe that drained into a main canal under the road, a home owner filled in the ditch with gravel for additional parking and plugged the pipe.

That helped create the huge washout.

More developments are going up in the area and I'm starting to worry. In the time my home was built, you did not have to have the foundation elevated. All of the natural and artificial drainage made sure we never flooded.

That's gone or crippled now and you can't sue the neighborhood for being morons or the county for requiring homes to be built higher to drain more water off while allowing the vital swale ditches to fall into disrepair.

It didn't help when the county came through and paved the road in front of my house. In doing so, they elevated it almost a foot. That's higher then my property. My driveway turns into a lake every time it rains hard out with the runoff from the road.

My Mom, who lived here alone then, was the only resident who fought having the road paved, seeing problems that could and would pop up in the future. All of the other neighbors considered her a crazy lady and agreed to have it paved. Thanks to this, there have been many problems, including the strip being used as a late night speedway.

The increased damage from hurricanes seems to be in direct proportion to the increase in population density an the areas most commonly hit.
 
2011-09-05 02:37:01 AM

Rik01: I have noticed a very distinct change over the decades concerning hurricane damage and recovery.

[snip commentary, because...]

The increased damage from hurricanes seems to be in direct proportion to the increase in population density an the areas most commonly hit.


Thanks for that insightful report, Ric. What's next in sports?
 
2011-09-05 03:17:01 AM

Schadenfreude ist die schoenste Freude: Why is it that after a century of using overhead power lines on posts of wood that get snapped in light storms that America still hasn't buried anything that isn't a heavy transmission line?


Yeah, I've always wondered about that. In newer residential areas in Canada there are no above-ground poles, and I lived through 20 years in Vancouver without one power outage due to windstorm or downed poles. And it looks a lot, lot nicer. After the initial cost of installation underground, I'd have to think it would save money over time.
 
2011-09-05 03:21:50 AM
In December of 2006 a significant windstorm was due to strike the Pacific Northwest with a cold wave right behind it. Sustained winds of 60-70mph with gusts as high as 90mph were expected and temperatures were supposed to stay below freezing afterwards. I had been very busy with work for the past few days and only heard about it at 4pm...storm was due to roll in around 7pm.

You know what I and my family did? We went to the hardware store and stocked up on storm and camping stuff. Mini-stoves, hatchet, wood, candles, space blankets, flashlights, lanterns, a crank lantern and several sets of batteries. We then hit the grocery store and grabbed non perishable, non cooking required foods of high calories, more wood and duct tape. Even though we really didn't have the extra money for all of it, we tightened our belts (so to speak) and did it anyway.

We then went home and taped up all the windows (we lived in a poorly insulated drafty place) and shut doors to rooms were weren't going to be using much. Okay it was only 1 bedroom, but we still shut the door.

The only thing we forgot to do was fill up on gas. (To be fair, we were both in our young 20's and didn't know that gas pumps would be out if the electricity was out. Fortunately one station was still working.)

In the end we went 5 days fairly well in sub freezing weather with our 2 and half year old son (who was bundled to the nines). The only concern we had was the beta fish (who we were able to move to our in-laws with a generator). By the last day I was getting concerned because we were low on wood (despite the resupply by a very generous property owner with a downed tree who brought a truck load to the apts for folks) and the fact that the apartment was so drafty even a fire running kept it in the mid 40's inside.

And while I count that a success for us, we've revamped even further so we can have regular hot meals. (The food we had took too much fuel to heat up and cooled off so fast it was cold by the time you were a few bites in.) We have a full size BBQ (we only had a small one then) as well as a regular supply of coal and frozen meat/hotdogs.

/So fark her expecting for the Waaabulance to pull up with seven course dinners and a full stocked motel room.
//Having emergency services doesn't absolve you of preparing your family as best as you can for long power outages and temporary short supplies.
 
2011-09-05 04:00:40 AM

Calamormine: Just popping in to say America isn't a Third World country, and will never be. A Third World country is one that remained neutral after the Cold War, rather than allying with NATO or with the Soviets.


Pretty much this. Third World doesn't mean what everyone thinks it means. First world was the "blue" side. Second world was the "reds." Third World was everyone neither blue nor red. Usually that was because they were poor places not of interest to be involved in either side but not always.

When the terms came about in the Cold War, the US was the very definition of a "blue" side country. To claim that the US could become Third World is like saying Britain could have become Switzerland.

Either way the measure of a destitute country isn't what a photograph can show 20 days after a natural disaster. It's the fact that a country wouldn't recover in many decades that would make it so (see: Louisiana).
 
2011-09-05 04:04:07 AM
The Interesting tag doesn't seem to mean what it used to.
 
2011-09-05 04:16:13 AM

Gyrfalcon: Rik01: I have noticed a very distinct change over the decades concerning hurricane damage and recovery.

[snip commentary, because...]

The increased damage from hurricanes seems to be in direct proportion to the increase in population density an the areas most commonly hit.

Thanks for that insightful report, Ric. What's next in sports?


For folks who don't live there and wonder why there are constantly millions in damage done, I found that very insightful.

Thanks for posting!

/similar problems up here with local flooding. Too much asphalt/concrete not enough drainage ponds ect...
//more ponds and such going in these days though.
 
2011-09-05 04:32:47 AM

rmoody: Came for shortsighted YA'LL IS SOME KINDA LIBERUL PUSSY USA USA USA comments, left disappointingly satisfied.

Stockholm syndrome is a biatch.


This so much.
 
2011-09-05 06:17:15 AM
She is whiny, but she also has a point. You guys make a lot of houses and powerline poles out of the flimsiest pieces of wood. You're just not that well prepared, that's all.
 
2011-09-05 09:27:23 AM
Damp squib? Fark you, "journalist"...entire towns were submerged. I know lots of people involved, both as victims, bystanders, and rescuers and charity workers. This was a major, major event for New York and Vermont.
 
2011-09-05 09:30:58 AM
Came for the IT Crowd reference.

/left happy
 
2011-09-05 09:41:38 AM

Rik01:
Katrina leveled Florida. It did a lot of damage to my city, but then again the population over the years has quadrupled and quadrupled again. Huge stands of wind breaking trees are gone. Natural drainage areas now have houses on them. Other are paved over. The beach area had to be evacuated and closed and suffered massive damage. Naturally. Hurricanes coming ashore hit the barrier island first and massive, expensive developments there have wiped out hundreds of acres of buffering wild woods.


You must be thinking of another hurricane, Katrina skimmed the lower part of Florida as a Cat 1 hurricane. Perhaps you're thinking about Andrew or Charlie?
 
2011-09-05 09:44:19 AM
Never lost power, never lost phone service, never lost internet access. Had torrential rains, and high winds, but nothing that I haven't seen in any other run-of-them ill nor'easter we've had here. About the worst that happened is we lost a few tree limbs. I'm not exactly sure what that lady is talking about other than her neighborhood/community sucks. I dunno, maybe she should move to another place?
 
2011-09-05 09:59:42 AM
I think she needs to look up the definition of "superpower". The U.S. is a military superpower, so was the USSR. It has nothing to do with anything she is whining about. Dumb cuitch.
 
2011-09-05 12:05:38 PM
Oh, and if the storm didn't do it for you, one of the hardest hit areas in NY, Amsterdam, just had a freakin' tornado.

There is a hell of a lot more to New York than the City.
 
2011-09-05 12:49:36 PM

This About That: That's a whiny dumbass. If she lived in a "third world country" she'd be dead by now.


She's also got a farking point. If you want a culture of 'I can do it myself, dagnabit, and don't you dare offer help to anyone! Self-reliance!', then whatever--you're an adult, you're allowed to be a moron.

If you want to help people in a disaster, you need an efficient, top-down, expert-run system, run by one person. Almost like a paramilitary organization. And there needs to be ONE, not ten.

America could switch between the two safely and easily, if we'd stop whining for ten minutes about how our mythical liberties are being threatened by people helping us. But it's hard to see that if you've never actually thought about disaster preparation.

/And from your post, I highly doubt you've thought about more than which brand of Cheetos to eat lately, but try to learn from those of us who have actually spent time learning about survival.
 
2011-09-05 12:52:06 PM
we are on our way to being a third world country
 
2011-09-05 01:03:06 PM

namegoeshere: There is a hell of a lot more to New York than the City.


Not if you ask them.
 
2011-09-05 02:12:03 PM
God, I farking HATE Eurotrash!
 
2011-09-05 02:22:52 PM

PsiChick: /And from your post, I highly doubt you've thought about more than which brand of Cheetos to eat lately, but try to learn from those of us who have actually spent time learning about survival.



OOOOO, looks like we've found the ugly biatch from the article's FARK login.

/Why don't you swagger in to FEMA and Homeland Securities offices and lay down the law to them with your arrogant "opinions," biatch?
 
2011-09-05 04:56:06 PM
The storm was bad. And the consequences could have been much worse.

People rarely see any value in prevention, especially when it WORKS.

"H1N1? We spent millions on vaccinations and we didn't see an outbreak." Well, yeah, that's what's supposed to happen. In this case, we spent millions on preparing for this storm, moving people and equipment to higher, more protected ground, cleaning out storm drains, preparing sandbags, etc. and, thankfully, loss of life was kept to a minimum. No panic, just days of watching the "train" barreling down on us.

/Lost power Sunday, got it back Wednesday.
//Verizon came by today and properly hooked up my phone and Internet.
///If we were a Third World country, we probably would not have noticed the presence of electricity or lack thereof.
 
2011-09-06 01:56:42 AM
You know somebody was on the job to fill up that water tanker truck and drive it - on roads already cleared of debris - to where this pommy bastid could fill up its' bukket....how about some appreciation for those guys who are clearing the roads, restoring power, and delivering your water, eh? Maybe next storm you can leave your bukket out to catch rainwater in.
 
2011-09-06 10:27:52 AM
snrk.snrrrck-k-k.hee-hee-hee.Ha ha ha ha BWA-A-A-A HA HA.What a dim bulb she is.
 
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