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(Jacksonville.com)   New fangled light bulbs cause bomb scare/evacuation at Jacksonville City Hall. Jax Skyway train shut down; both riders extremely annoyed by inconvenience   (jacksonville.com) divider line 67
    More: Florida  
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5167 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Aug 2011 at 2:51 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-08-23 01:55:23 PM  
Is it really any wonder that these new environmental lightbulbs are freaking people out? I saw one at the store the other day and it looked like a damn corkscrew, and I swear to God it was making some kind of sound.

Luckily, I stocked up on incandescents before they became illegal. I bought 1,000 24-count cases of them online for just under $10,000 and I had to rent a 20' x 20' storage unit to house them, but you can't really put a price on piece of mind.
 
2011-08-23 01:59:57 PM  
They have electric lights in Florida now? That's great news! Congratulations.
 
2011-08-23 02:53:18 PM  
CFL THREAD!
 
2011-08-23 02:56:59 PM  
ftfa: "I hope this is not a bomb and that Irene goes away," Mayor Alvin Brown said.

Seriously, our Mayor has some ADD...
 
2011-08-23 02:57:01 PM  
Biatch all you want, but it's precautions like this that keep us from having another 9/11. A pack of LED lightbulbs is a small price to pay for the security we enjoy.
 
2011-08-23 02:57:39 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: CFL THREAD!

LED THREAD!
 
2011-08-23 02:58:59 PM  

the_sidewinder: Pants full of macaroni!!: CFL THREAD!
LED THREAD!


The LEDs are awesome. I hope they become economically viable someday.
 
2011-08-23 02:59:39 PM  
"The Sheriff's Office bomb squad was called to City Hall about 8:30 a.m. after an X-ray of the package in the mailroom showed it had some type of wiring..."


To be fair, LED bulbs do have a very sinister appearance. It had wires.
 
2011-08-23 02:59:41 PM  

sigdiamond2000: I bought 1,000 24-count cases of them online for just under $10,000 and I had to rent a 20' x 20' storage unit to house them, but you can't really put a price on piece of mind.


Your future's so bright, you gotta wear shades?
 
Skr
2011-08-23 03:00:33 PM  
data.tumblr.com

Why does everything I think I see, become an explosive device to me?
 
2011-08-23 03:02:01 PM  
What an LED light bulb might look like

asia.cnet.com

or

www.switchlightbulbs.com
 
2011-08-23 03:02:19 PM  
IEDs put out a lot of light, but it only lasts a split second.
 
2011-08-23 03:08:19 PM  
They're also baffled by indoor plumbing. Why spend all that money for a dog's drinking bowl?
 
2011-08-23 03:11:37 PM  

sigdiamond2000: Luckily, I stocked up on incandescents before they became illegal. I bought 1,000 24-count cases of them online for just under $10,000 and I had to rent a 20' x 20' storage unit to house them, but you can't really put a price on piece of mind.


Amen, brother sig. It'll be a cold day in hell before them librul pussies pry the last light bulb from my cold dead hand!
 
2011-08-23 03:17:02 PM  

Hyppy: Biatch all you want, but it's precautions overreactions like this that keep us from having another 9/11 sanity. A pack of LED lightbulbs is a small price to pay for the security police state we enjoy.


/trolling the trolls
 
2011-08-23 03:19:35 PM  
Poor Irene.
 
2011-08-23 03:24:44 PM  
What a bunch of dumbasses, of all the things that have wiring in them, a bomb seems like one of the least likely and ought to be the most obvious. Surely if they have a freaking X-ray machine they would have somebody trained to operate it effectively??

I get a laugh out of these schmucks hoarding incandescent light bulbs. The ban only covers plain old fashioned bulbs, you can still get slightly improved types such as those with halogen capsules inside a normal looking bulb or funny wattages that fit loopholes in the ban if you really must have that genuine incandescent glow. Nobody is FORCING you to save money, but then I've been surprised at the number of people who cannot mentally connect the amount they pay each month on power to the amount of power they use. They buy the 75 cent bulb and spend $10 to run it because the $4 bulb is "too expensive" even if it costs only $1 to run.

The rest of us have been enjoying low electric bills for a long time, I haven't used any ordinary incandescent bulbs in my house in over a decade. In the summer I save even more because I don't have all the added heat load from inefficient bulbs for my A/C to deal with. On top of that, I used to replace bulbs constantly, now I regularly get YEARS out of them. Lately I've been buying the Philips LED bulbs and phasing out CFLs, they're expensive but after using one for a while I had to have more. The light quality is excellent, they come on instantly, they dim all the way down to a faint glow on a plain old ordinary dimmer switch, and they are not damaged by frequent on/off cycles like CFLs. Yeah they cost a lot initially, but in the long term they pay for themselves. Even with a handful of early failures of cheap CFLs, those have paid for themselves many times over for me and the LEDs fix almost every fault I've found with CFL.

There are a lot of cheap junk LED bulbs out there though, I'm sold on Philips for now (no affiliation, I just have bought a lot of different types to try and like them the best) but if you want to try something else, buy one to evaluate before buying more of them.
 
2011-08-23 03:25:04 PM  
Wow! And they weren't even nuclear light bulbs.
http://www.uncoveror.com/nukebulbs.htm
 
2011-08-23 03:32:27 PM  

James10952001: There are a lot of cheap junk LED bulbs out there though, I'm sold on Philips for now (no affiliation, I just have bought a lot of different types to try and like them the best) but if you want to try something else, buy one to evaluate before buying more of them.


I will also vouch for the Philips LEDs, that one in the image up above? Ihave two of that same one, plus others

/Work great in my ceiling fan too
 
2011-08-23 03:32:56 PM  

James10952001: I get a laugh out of these schmucks hoarding incandescent light bulbs. The ban only covers plain old fashioned bulbs, you can still get slightly improved types such as those with halogen capsules inside a normal looking bulb or funny wattages that fit loopholes in the ban if you really must have that genuine incandescent glow. Nobody is FORCING you to save money, but then I've been surprised at the number of people who cannot mentally connect the amount they pay each month on power to the amount of power they use. They buy the 75 cent bulb and spend $10 to run it because the $4 bulb is "too expensive" even if it costs only $1 to run.


Have you seen the list of hazardous materials in a CFL bulb? Now that the EPA can regulate anything that produces carbon dioxide (read: everything), I'm pretty sure they can come down hard on someone for not disposing of their CFL bulbs correctly. Hell, with the limitless power these unelected regulators have, I'd be shiatting my pants just handling one of those toxic bulbs.

Give me the old-fashioned incandescents at $0.75 apiece any day. If I pay for my power, it's my power. I can use it how I want, and it's nobody business but mine.
 
2011-08-23 03:33:43 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: CFL THREAD!


4.bp.blogspot.com

Sure, why not. Seems odd choice for a thread jack, but have at it.
 
2011-08-23 03:34:58 PM  
what new fangled light bulbs may look like

www.homedepot.com

(E)* means these bulbs meet Federal minimum efficiency standards.
 
2011-08-23 03:37:46 PM  

Uneven Displacement: Poor Irene.



Some times I have a great notion
To jump in to the river and drown
 
2011-08-23 03:57:29 PM  
This has to be the "I smoked to much crack as a child quote":


Sheriff's Office Director John Hartley said the package of light bulbs were not meant to cause such alarm.

No Shiat? How did you come to that conclusion genius?

/I feel safer now
 
2011-08-23 04:00:25 PM  
i used the jax skyway once.
 
2011-08-23 04:01:31 PM  

Uneven Displacement: Poor Irene.


Mother-in-laws name is Irene. I LOL'd.
/not quite a hurricane.
 
2011-08-23 04:07:34 PM  

James10952001: I get a laugh out of these schmucks hoarding incandescent light bulbs. The ban only covers plain old fashioned bulbs, you can still get slightly improved types such as those with halogen capsules inside a normal looking bulb or funny wattages that fit loopholes in the ban if you really must have that genuine incandescent glow.



cutnpasted

Get ready! On January 1, 2012, new regulations will take effect that will change the lightbulb shopping landscape. Options for lightbulbs will change, but not to worry: The options will be plentiful if you educate yourself a bit on the new law,

So, what are these new regulations? In general, they place efficiency standards on incandescent bulbs and will take effect in stages. Starting in January, any bulb that can generate the amount of light produced by a conventional 100-watt bulb, but do so with about 30 percent less energy, will be eligible for sale. In 2013, the rule will be extended to 75-watt bulbs, and then in 2014, by 40- and 60-watt bulbs. However, no specific type of bulb is outlawed if it meets the efficiency standards set out in the law.

The impending law seems to have triggered some great technological advances, too. Halogen bulbs, a type of incandescent that contains a tungsten filament, are now available in the bulb shape we all associate with the typical lightbulb. Compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) deliver light more quickly, and have eliminated the buzzing and flickering they were known for when they were first introduced.

Here are some tips for negotiating the new lighting frontier:

1.Ease into the light. Replace bulbs as needed instead of replacing all the bulbs in your house at once. Technology is rapidly changing, and prices are consistently dropping.
2.Consult the experts. Be informed when you enter the marketplace by checking out sources such as energystar.gov, energysavers.gov, and homedepot.com, which offer a video tutorial on the new law.
3.The label counts. It's best to purchase well-known brands and bulbs that carry the Energy Star designation.
4.Experiment. Even with a lot of information, you may have to purchase a few different bulbs to get the exact fit for your home or office.
 
2011-08-23 04:36:18 PM  

SouthernManDunWrong: Get ready! On January 1, 2012, new regulations will take effect that will change the lightbulb shopping landscape. Options for lightbulbs will change, but not to worry: The options will be plentiful if you educate yourself a bit on the new law,

So, what are these new regulations? In general, they place efficiency standards on incandescent bulbs and will take effect in stages. Starting in January, any bulb that can generate the amount of light produced by a conventional 100-watt bulb, but do so with about 30 percent less energy, will be eligible for sale. In 2013, the rule will be extended to 75-watt bulbs, and then in 2014, by 40- and 60-watt bulbs. However, no specific type of bulb is outlawed if it meets the efficiency standards set out in the law.

The impending law seems to have triggered some great technological advances, too. Halogen bulbs, a type of incandescent that contains a tungsten filament, are now available in the bulb shape we all associate with the typical lightbulb. Compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) deliver light more quickly, and have eliminated the buzzing and flickering they were known for when they were first introduced.

Here are some tips for negotiating the new lighting frontier:

1.Ease into the light. Replace bulbs as needed instead of replacing all the bulbs in your house at once. Technology is rapidly changing, and prices are consistently dropping.
2.Consult the experts. Be informed when you enter the marketplace by checking out sources such as energystar.gov, energysavers.gov, and homedepot.com, which offer a video tutorial on the new law.
3.The label counts. It's best to purchase well-known brands and bulbs that carry the Energy Star designation.
4.Experiment. Even with a lot of information, you may have to purchase a few different bulbs to get the exact fit for your home or office.


If you really, really, really can't stand halogen bulbs, and if you own your home or have your landlord's permission, then call your electrician and have him put in one or more candelabrum-type overhead fixtures. Candelabrum-base bulbs up to 60 watts are exempt from the new standards, and I've never seen a bigger one anyway.

(P.S. That was actually sane and derp-free. Who are you, and WTF have you done with SMDW?)
 
2011-08-23 04:53:21 PM  

James10952001: They buy the 75 cent bulb and spend $10 to run it because the $4 bulb is "too expensive" even if it costs only $1 to run.


You pay $4 per lamp? Sucker. I get mine at various dollar stores. Fine one that stocks them and buy them a dozen at a time. It's not uncommon for some type of agency to subsidize the cost of CFLs to get people to buy them.

My dollar store CFLs are going on 4 years and still working fine.

Hyppy: Have you seen the list of hazardous materials in a CFL bulb?

Give me the old-fashioned incandescents at $0.75 apiece any day. If I pay for my power, it's my power. I can use it how I want, and it's nobody business but mine.


Ok, for starters, how much of these dangerous materials are in each bulb? I know how much we're dealing with, and as an electrician I should, but do you? How much mercury are in each bulb compared to a tan of tuna? Let's test your knowledge.

Second, yes you can spend your resources how you please. That will remain your right. However, take Adam Carolla's stance on these newfangled technowizzits. If you don't want to switch to energy efficient technologies for the sake of the very environment that you live in every day, then don't. But do it for you're own personal gain. Do it because it personally saves you money.

Anyone against saving money with extremely little downside is a fool. And you know what they say about a fool and his money.

/It's as baffling as the "What if i WANT to burn extra gas and only get 10mpg?"
//Yes, I've heard that argument against fuel efficient vehicles.
 
2011-08-23 04:53:36 PM  

NewportBarGuy: sigdiamond2000: Luckily, I stocked up on incandescents before they became illegal. I bought 1,000 24-count cases of them online for just under $10,000 and I had to rent a 20' x 20' storage unit to house them, but you can't really put a price on piece of mind.

Amen, brother sig. It'll be a cold day in hell before them librul pussies pry the last light bulb from my cold dead hand!


I bought a glassblowing rig and a tungsten wire extruder for my bunker workshop, and will be reloading and repairing my lightbulbs just like I do my ammo.
 
2011-08-23 04:57:28 PM  

Uneven Displacement: Poor Irene.


Irene goodnight, Irene goodnight
Goodnight Irene, goodnight Irene
I'll see you in my dreams
 
2011-08-23 04:58:47 PM  

SouthernManDunWrong: James10952001: I get a laugh out of these schmucks hoarding incandescent light bulbs. The ban only covers plain old fashioned bulbs, you can still get slightly improved types such as those with halogen capsules inside a normal looking bulb or funny wattages that fit loopholes in the ban if you really must have that genuine incandescent glow.


cutnpasted

Get ready! On January 1, 2012, new regulations will take effect that will change the lightbulb shopping landscape. Options for lightbulbs will change, but not to worry: The options will be plentiful if you educate yourself a bit on the new law,

So, what are these new regulations? In general, they place efficiency standards on incandescent bulbs and will take effect in stages. Starting in January, any bulb that can generate the amount of light produced by a conventional 100-watt bulb, but do so with about 30 percent less energy, will be eligible for sale. In 2013, the rule will be extended to 75-watt bulbs, and then in 2014, by 40- and 60-watt bulbs. However, no specific type of bulb is outlawed if it meets the efficiency standards set out in the law.

The impending law seems to have triggered some great technological advances, too. Halogen bulbs, a type of incandescent that contains a tungsten filament, are now available in the bulb shape we all associate with the typical lightbulb. Compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) deliver light more quickly, and have eliminated the buzzing and flickering they were known for when they were first introduced.

Here are some tips for negotiating the new lighting frontier:

1.Ease into the light. Replace bulbs as needed instead of replacing all the bulbs in your house at once. Technology is rapidly changing, and prices are consistently dropping.
2.Consult the experts. Be informed when you enter the marketplace by checking out sources such as energystar.gov, energysavers.gov, and homedepot.com, which offer a video tutorial on the new law.
3.The label counts. It's best to purchase well-known brands and bulbs that carry the Energy Star designation.
4.Experiment. Even with a lot of information, you may have to purchase a few different bulbs to get the exact fit for your home or office.


The only thing I can add to that is to make sure, if you plan on dimming any new LED lamps/modules, you check to make sure that the dimmer is compatible. Typically LED's prefer electronic low voltage dimmers, but in many situations a standard line voltage dimmer will work.

The new halogen replacements will last a bit longer than the previous incandescent, but will burn a bit whiter as well. In some cases the manufacturers are adding a phosphor to the lamps to give it the yellowish hue we associate with incandescent, but not always.

If you are buying LED, make certain of two things. One that it has Lighting Facts certification on the back (it will look like a nutrition label) and two, if possible, get Energy Star, the requirements for achieving that standard are very tight right now and most of the crap does not qualify.
 
2011-08-23 05:04:23 PM  
it's funny b/c no one really rides the skyway

/that'sthejoke.jpg?
 
2011-08-23 05:18:57 PM  
CFL THREAD

t0.gstatic.com
 
2011-08-23 05:27:19 PM  

Whiskey Dickens: CFL THREAD
[t0.gstatic.com image 259x194]


Take off, eh!
 
2011-08-23 05:31:32 PM  

zombie deoderant stick: it's funny b/c no one really rides the skyway

/that'sthejoke.jpg?


About a decade ago I used to ride the Skyway from San Marco to downtown (for work) when I would park at my friend's place in San Marco. The only time I've ever ridden it.

/BSB
 
2011-08-23 06:01:08 PM  

CtrlAltDestroy: Ok, for starters, how much of these dangerous materials are in each bulb? I know how much we're dealing with, and as an electrician I should, but do you? How much mercury are in each bulb compared to a tan of tuna? Let's test your knowledge.


There's about 5 milligrams of mercury in a CFL, which is about 100 times what you'll find in a can of tuna (~50micrograms or so). Considering that just a few cans of tuna per week is considered toxic, I think this is something to be worried about.
 
2011-08-23 06:09:26 PM  

Hyppy: CtrlAltDestroy: Ok, for starters, how much of these dangerous materials are in each bulb? I know how much we're dealing with, and as an electrician I should, but do you? How much mercury are in each bulb compared to a tan of tuna? Let's test your knowledge.

There's about 5 milligrams of mercury in a CFL, which is about 100 times what you'll find in a can of tuna (~50micrograms or so). Considering that just a few cans of tuna per week is considered toxic, I think this is something to be worried about.


Gotta say, I might be impressed. Either you had some knowledge about what you were spouting off about or you know how to use Google. Either way, it's easy to find a disposal center for these lamps so it's not a big deal to have them around. Hell, you can even just the bad ones in a box for a few months/years until you have enough to warrant a trip to a center/slight diversion from your weekend errand run.

I'm very safety conscience due to the nature of my work, training, and personality. I go out of my way to be safe and I'm pretty good at calculating risks. That said, I'm not worried about these bulbs at all. Unless you have a habit of being needlessly careless with them or breaking them on purpose. They're made of strong glass.
 
2011-08-23 06:16:26 PM  
You pay $4 per lamp? Sucker. I get mine at various dollar stores. Fine one that stocks them and buy them a dozen at a time. It's not uncommon for some type of agency to subsidize the cost of CFLs to get people to buy them.

Those numbers were not based on anything, they were simply rough/worst case examples I pulled out of my butt to illustrate a point because I didn't feel like looking up and calculating the actual values. Perhaps I should have just said that people buy a cheap bulb that costs more in electricity to run than the expensive bulb including the initial purchase price.

Most CFLs I have are a dollar or two, I was buying them mostly at Costco. That's down from ~$10 when I first started buying them, the cost of being an early adopter.

Today I'm paying $22-$40 for LED bulbs and have been phasing them in as my existing stock of CFLs is depleted.

The mercury complaint about CFLs is mostly bunk. Last I checked ~80% of the electricity in the US is produced by burning coal which releases more mercury into the environment over the life of an incandescent lamp than is contained in a CFL and said CFL can be recycled where the mercury is recovered and reused. LED lamps however contain zero mercury so this is not an issue to begin with.

Those griping about the government making choices for them, well I don't like it either, but I recognize that sometimes it's necessary for the government to mandate things for the common good. It's no different than fuel economy mandates for cars or efficiency mandates for air conditioners. Manufactures whine at first that it's too difficult but in the end they always manage and we all benefit as the cost of the new technology drops.
 
2011-08-23 06:23:14 PM  
There's about 5 milligrams of mercury in a CFL, which is about 100 times what you'll find in a can of tuna (~50micrograms or so). Considering that just a few cans of tuna per week is considered toxic, I think this is something to be worried about.


I dunno about you, but I try not to eat lightbulbs, whether or not they contain mercury. So eating 100 cans of tuna is as bad for you as eating a lightbulb that doesn't sound like such a bad situation. I'm betting you have many substances around your house that are far more toxic, I know I do.

Virtually any store that sells them will accept dead ones for recycling, it's not THAT hard. I collect them in a box and when I have half a dozen or so I take them on my next shopping trip and drop them off. That works out to around once a year for me. I expect LED bulbs to continue improving and dropping in price to the point that when I run out of my stock of CFLs, the LED replacements will be close to the same price.
 
2011-08-23 07:55:25 PM  
LED thread? Led thread.

i.imgur.com

i.imgur.com



i.imgur.com



Those waiting for LED to come down in price, don't hold your breath. Sapphire substrates are typically required for reliable high-output LEDs, and China has a huge stranglehold on the rare-earth metals market, especially on the stuff we need to make LEDs, while the USA and other countries have languished in that side of the industry. On top of that, the long life of a GOOD LED bulb means a long time to wait for repeat business, so the price must accordingly be adjusted for that issue.

The actual technology, as far as LED is concerned, is mature and prime. You just need to do research and find good stuff instead of cheap Chinese knockoff stuff.

Or you can just come to me and I can point you in the right directions. I'm a lighting research director for a horticultural company, specializing in optoelectronics, I'll set you straight.
 
2011-08-23 08:00:35 PM  
what a lit LED downlight fixture may look like: a good one

by Enlux: Find your local distributor! (Available in 3 shades of white light)

a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net
 
2011-08-23 08:07:01 PM  

TDBoedy: what a lit LED downlight fixture may look like: a good one

by Enlux: Find your local distributor! (Available in 3 shades of white light)

[a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net image 405x720]


I've burned out 20 Enlux units. No thank you. They're like the Kessils of the interior LED lighting industry.
 
2011-08-23 08:09:15 PM  
More LED goodness.

This is a new system I have in development to further reduce the power needed for horticulture.

Link (new window/tab)

/innovating more than any other company out there at 1/10,000th the R&D price.
//brains, I have them
 
2011-08-23 08:10:29 PM  

khyberkitsune: Those waiting for LED to come down in price, don't hold your breath. Sapphire substrates are typically required for reliable high-output LEDs, and China has a huge stranglehold on the rare-earth metals market, especially on the stuff we need to make LEDs, while the USA and other countries have languished in that side of the industry. On top of that, the long life of a GOOD LED bulb means a long time to wait for repeat business, so the price must accordingly be adjusted for that issue.


There is still plenty of research going into emmisive materials for LEDs, including silicon and Quantum Dots (which is really cool if it ever gets to consumer products)
 
2011-08-23 08:15:29 PM  

Hyppy: CtrlAltDestroy: Ok, for starters, how much of these dangerous materials are in each bulb? I know how much we're dealing with, and as an electrician I should, but do you? How much mercury are in each bulb compared to a tan of tuna? Let's test your knowledge.

There's about 5 milligrams of mercury in a CFL, which is about 100 times what you'll find in a can of tuna (~50micrograms or so). Considering that just a few cans of tuna per week is considered toxic, I think this is something to be worried about.


Sure, if you find yourself unable to resist eating a lightbulb a year.
 
2011-08-23 08:16:33 PM  

James10952001: What a bunch of dumbasses, of all the things that have wiring in them, a bomb seems like one of the least likely and ought to be the most obvious. Surely if they have a freaking X-ray machine they would have somebody trained to operate it effectively??

I get a laugh out of these schmucks hoarding incandescent light bulbs. The ban only covers plain old fashioned bulbs, you can still get slightly improved types such as those with halogen capsules inside a normal looking bulb or funny wattages that fit loopholes in the ban if you really must have that genuine incandescent glow. Nobody is FORCING you to save money, but then I've been surprised at the number of people who cannot mentally connect the amount they pay each month on power to the amount of power they use. They buy the 75 cent bulb and spend $10 to run it because the $4 bulb is "too expensive" even if it costs only $1 to run.

The rest of us have been enjoying low electric bills for a long time, I haven't used any ordinary incandescent bulbs in my house in over a decade. In the summer I save even more because I don't have all the added heat load from inefficient bulbs for my A/C to deal with. On top of that, I used to replace bulbs constantly, now I regularly get YEARS out of them. Lately I've been buying the Philips LED bulbs and phasing out CFLs, they're expensive but after using one for a while I had to have more. The light quality is excellent, they come on instantly, they dim all the way down to a faint glow on a plain old ordinary dimmer switch, and they are not damaged by frequent on/off cycles like CFLs. Yeah they cost a lot initially, but in the long term they pay for themselves. Even with a handful of early failures of cheap CFLs, those have paid for themselves many times over for me and the LEDs fix almost every fault I've found with CFL.

There are a lot of cheap junk LED bulbs out there though, I'm sold on Philips for now (no affiliation, I just have bought a lot of different types to try and like them the best) but if you want to try something else, buy one to evaluate before buying more of them.


CFL costs are rising because of China's strangehold on rare earth materials used in CFL's. Expect a 25%-40% price hike within a year.


http://prioritylighting.com/2011/06/phosphors-price-increase/


http://synergylightingusa.com/fluorescent-light-bulbs-price-increase- r are-earth-metal-shortage/


http://www.fsgi.com/images/ltgtoolbox/fluorescent_lamp_volatility/TCP . PDF

This will eventually began eating in the supposed energy savings of CFL bulbs.


Yes, this is a ban. If the bulb can't reach a certain arbitrary level, it can't be sold. Period. It. Cant. Be. Sold. This effectively removes all inexpensive forms of regular Type A incans from the market.

At Lowe's a LED candelabra replacement for a 25 watt incandescent was $14. There was no higher wattage options, which means you only have the light output of 25 watts.. To relamp a 3 light chandelier, it's $42.

All this is doing is forcing people to pay more for a necessity. Most will not pay $14 to replace a light bulb because they can't afford that. Immelt (GE) and Phillips have both stated that they wanted incans gone because of profit margins.

James, while the stores may take them back, what if I don't? What if I'm too lazy or don't care? EPA and all the lighting manu. say these must be recycled?
 
2011-08-23 08:23:47 PM  

the_sidewinder: khyberkitsune: Those waiting for LED to come down in price, don't hold your breath. Sapphire substrates are typically required for reliable high-output LEDs, and China has a huge stranglehold on the rare-earth metals market, especially on the stuff we need to make LEDs, while the USA and other countries have languished in that side of the industry. On top of that, the long life of a GOOD LED bulb means a long time to wait for repeat business, so the price must accordingly be adjusted for that issue.

There is still plenty of research going into emmisive materials for LEDs, including silicon and Quantum Dots (which is really cool if it ever gets to consumer products)


Silicon-based LEDs have worse droop issues and quantum dot tech while nice has a long way to go towards matching the efficiencies of current diode tech.

The next good LED tech I'm eyeing is the one that allows a single substrate to emit multiple wavelengths from the same crystalline structure, which quantum dots cannot do.
 
2011-08-23 08:27:26 PM  

Artcurus: while the stores may take them back, what if I don't? What if I'm too lazy or don't care? EPA and all the lighting manu. say these must be recycled?


Based on the average power generation mix in the US, using and throwing away CFLs releases less mercury into the environment than using incandescent bulbs simply because it uses less power, and we use a lot of mercury-releasing coal generators in the US. Less power means less mercury over the bulb's lifetime, even if there's some in the bulb.

Recycling them is obviously better still, of course.
 
2011-08-23 08:37:32 PM  

khyberkitsune: emit multiple wavelengths from the same crystalline structure, which quantum dots cannot do.


They have one right now, but it only emits blue and yellow (giving that old harsh white)

As for QDs, because they are effective on a particle by particle basis, I'm sure they could find a way of depositing QDs with different emmisive properties on the same substrate
 
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