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(Some Guy)   There's money in the Taco Stand   (wlwt.com) divider line 52
    More: Obvious  
•       •       •

6846 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Aug 2011 at 10:47 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-08-16 07:50:24 AM  
4.bp.blogspot.com

+1 subby
 
2011-08-16 10:23:13 AM  
FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.
 
2011-08-16 10:49:23 AM  
SHE approves.
 
2011-08-16 10:50:11 AM  

Amos Quito: Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations?


Did we ever?
 
2011-08-16 10:52:41 AM  

Amos Quito: Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.


DRTFA but you're saying I should be able to ship a big pile of cocaine from Mexico to Canada, by ground, through the US and they couldn't do anything about it because it's not "destined" for US soil?


Amos Quito: ...as they were not technically on US soil


also, wait, weren't they?
 
2011-08-16 10:59:27 AM  
I just blue myself.
 
2011-08-16 11:00:23 AM  

ichiban: Amos Quito: Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

DRTFA but you're saying I should be able to ship a big pile of cocaine from Mexico to Canada, by ground, through the US and they couldn't do anything about it because it's not "destined" for US soil?



They could alert Canadian authorities to the contraband, and possibly receive permission to take action.


Amos Quito: ...as they were not technically on US soil

also, wait, weren't they?



No, technically, they weren't on US soil, as the handy links in my earlier post explain.
 
2011-08-16 11:00:39 AM  
NO TOUCHING!
 
2011-08-16 11:05:57 AM  
That musty old clap-trap?
 
2011-08-16 11:15:20 AM  

ichiban: DRTFA but you're saying I should be able to ship a big pile of cocaine from Mexico to Canada, by ground, through the US and they couldn't do anything about it because it's not "destined" for US soil?


If it was legal in Mexico and Canada and it poses no risk to anyone in America while it's here, I don't see why you couldn't. Like the other guy said, though, since coke is illegal in Canada it's likely Canada would tell you to do something about it.

What if I have a legitimate reason to send money from Mexico to Colombia? Can the US take my money because I was unaware that it would pass through their jurisdiction and, therefore, didn't know I had to fill out US forms? Was I supposed to know a shipment from Mexico to Colombia would take a trip to Kentucky in between?
 
2011-08-16 11:19:53 AM  
But did they fall for the banana in the tailpipe?
 
2011-08-16 11:26:21 AM  

DarthBrooks: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 628x371]

+1 subby


Double +1. Made me giggle.
 
2011-08-16 11:27:25 AM  
I'm going to try something...it's a little risky...

img856.imageshack.us
 
2011-08-16 11:31:39 AM  
Okay..Lindsay, are you forgetting that I was a professional twice over an analyst and a therapist. The world's first analrapist.
 
2011-08-16 11:33:23 AM  

Amos Quito: FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.


I'm sure that's what the owner will say when he shows up to contest the seizure of the hundreds of thousands of dollars he hid in tortilla rollers and shipped to Narco-topia.
 
2011-08-16 11:37:32 AM  

MoronLessOff: SHE approves.


Her?
 
2011-08-16 11:41:15 AM  
Well, it's all gone now dad, and it was my decision. So next time you want to have a little power struggle, remember that you're playing with fire.
 
2011-08-16 11:42:38 AM  

squidgod2000: Amos Quito: FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.

I'm sure that's what the owner will say when he shows up to contest the seizure of the hundreds of thousands of dollars he hid in tortilla rollers and shipped to Narco-topia.



In any case, it's the business of Colombia and/or Mexico, not of the US.
 
2011-08-16 11:52:53 AM  

sandmanahoy: MoronLessOff: SHE approves.

Her?


SHE
www.heyuguys.co.uk
 
2011-08-16 11:56:11 AM  
So they drilled into the rollers to see if there was money, and THEN they took off the endcap? Why the fark didn't they do that first???
 
2011-08-16 11:56:37 AM  
27.media.tumblr.com

Fireman: Somebody wanted this place to go.

Michael: Yeah? What do you mean, arson?

Fireman: Oh, definitely the work of a flamer.


Michael: You burn down the storage unit?

T-Bone: Oh, most definitely.

/hot like a banana stand on fire.
 
2011-08-16 12:11:19 PM  
I love the Arrested Development references.
 
2011-08-16 12:11:28 PM  
I really thought this was going to be a Palin article.
 
2011-08-16 12:25:33 PM  
Like the guy in the 3,000 dollar suit is going to stand in line and fill out paper work with a guy who doesn't even make that in one month... COME ON
 
2011-08-16 12:28:04 PM  
Did the state of Kentucky get moved to a spot right between Mexico and Colombia at some point?

Because that would be hilarious for all involved.
 
2011-08-16 12:40:53 PM  
Duh. It's as nose as the Ann on plain's face.
 
2011-08-16 12:45:51 PM  
There is money in the Taco stand, unless you hire T-Bone, because he's a flamer.

/oh, subby, thanks for bringing up that show I love so much.
 
2011-08-16 12:55:30 PM  
<Bubbles_with_sawed-off_shopping_cart_handle.jpg>
 
2011-08-16 01:15:13 PM  
There was $250,000 lining the walls of that stand. How much clearer can I say it: THERE IS ALWAYS MONEY IN THE BANANA STAND!
 
2011-08-16 01:17:22 PM  
There's money in the Taco Stand, but they don't take $2 bills.

/fnorgby
 
2011-08-16 01:27:49 PM  
I just hope Franklin isn't there, I don't want him to point out my cracker ass in front of Ann
 
2011-08-16 01:42:51 PM  

Tango_down: I just blue myself.


Okay, you know what you do? You buy yourself a tape recorder, you just record yourself for a whole day. I think you're going to be surprised at some of your phrasing.
 
2011-08-16 01:48:09 PM  

Amos Quito: squidgod2000: Amos Quito: FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.

I'm sure that's what the owner will say when he shows up to contest the seizure of the hundreds of thousands of dollars he hid in tortilla rollers and shipped to Narco-topia.


In any case, it's the business of Colombia and/or Mexico, not of the US.


Just curious - I did read the link you provided on designated customs areas and it reads, "The goods within the area are also subject to checks regarding their compliance with local rules (for example drug laws and biosecurity regulations), and thus may be impounded or turned back."

So... they did just that, no?
 
2011-08-16 02:19:19 PM  

AqueousBoy: Amos Quito: squidgod2000: Amos Quito: FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.

I'm sure that's what the owner will say when he shows up to contest the seizure of the hundreds of thousands of dollars he hid in tortilla rollers and shipped to Narco-topia.


In any case, it's the business of Colombia and/or Mexico, not of the US.

Just curious - I did read the link you provided on designated customs areas and it reads, "The goods within the area are also subject to checks regarding their compliance with local rules (for example drug laws and biosecurity regulations), and thus may be impounded or turned back."

So... they did just that, no?



The customs areas also deal with goods bound for delivery in the US, and US bound goods would rightfully be subject it US inspection and laws. But in this case the goods were bound for a third country (Colombia), so "local rules" would not apply, as the goods would never technically enter the domain of either the US or any part thereof.

That is what transshipment is all about - facilitating the transfer of goods to third-party countries. The relevant paragraph: "The fact that goods are technically still outside the country of the customs area also allows easy transshipment to a third country without the need for customs checks or duties."

Take container traffic as an example: A container of wine is shipped from France to Australia, but the container is dropped in the port of an Islamic country (such as Saudi Arabia or Yemen) so that it can later be loaded onto a different ship for delivery to Australia. Alcohol is forbidden by law in these countries, should they therefor have the authority to confiscate and destroy the container load of wine?
 
2011-08-16 02:20:12 PM  

MoronLessOff: sandmanahoy: MoronLessOff: SHE approves.

Her?

SHE
[www.heyuguys.co.uk image 220x150]


who?
 
2011-08-16 02:26:29 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: That musty old clap-trap?


....

Oh, yes, the cabin! Well, that will be difficult too.
 
2011-08-16 02:40:48 PM  
26.media.tumblr.com

oblig
 
2011-08-16 03:02:43 PM  

D3_WR: MoronLessOff: sandmanahoy: MoronLessOff: SHE approves.

Her?

SHE
[www.heyuguys.co.uk image 220x150]

who?


I am disappoint.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2011-08-16 03:10:32 PM  
Get rid of the Seaward.
 
2011-08-16 03:18:17 PM  
Id like to kiss him between the cheeks so to speak.
 
2011-08-16 03:27:24 PM  
And that's why you don't use a one-armed person to scare someone.
 
2011-08-16 03:53:08 PM  

Amos Quito: squidgod2000: Amos Quito: FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.

I'm sure that's what the owner will say when he shows up to contest the seizure of the hundreds of thousands of dollars he hid in tortilla rollers and shipped to Narco-topia.


In any case, it's the business of Colombia and/or Mexico, not of the US.


The US was just being a Good Neighbor.
 
2011-08-16 04:08:12 PM  

Ninja Otter: Get rid of the Seaward.


I'm right here Michael.
 
2011-08-16 04:37:12 PM  
Marry me.
 
2011-08-16 04:55:10 PM  
I clicked through because I thought "taco stand" was code for "prostitution ring".

/Disappointed
 
2011-08-16 06:01:27 PM  

bookman: Amos Quito: squidgod2000: Amos Quito: FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.

I'm sure that's what the owner will say when he shows up to contest the seizure of the hundreds of thousands of dollars he hid in tortilla rollers and shipped to Narco-topia.


In any case, it's the business of Colombia and/or Mexico, not of the US.

The US was just being a Good Neighbor.



We're a nosy neighbor with a bad habit of getting into other people's business, a habit that seems to be pissing more and more of the rest of the world off.
 
2011-08-17 12:50:11 AM  
I'm sure that Egg is a very nice person. I just don't want you spending all your money getting her all glittered up for Easter, you know?
 
2011-08-17 01:09:17 AM  

Amos Quito: bookman: Amos Quito: squidgod2000: Amos Quito: FTA: The two shipments of eight tortilla presses originated from the same individual in Mexico and were headed to Bogotá, Colombia, agents said. While shipping money is not illegal, the method was. "You can ship money in and out of the United States, you just have to fill out the appropriate forms," Willard said.


This is bullshiat. Does the US no longer recognize the sovereignty of foreign nations? (rhetorical question)

US Customs had no business opening or confiscating the contents, as they were not technically on US soil. The tortilla rollers were never destined for the United States, they were being shipped from Mexico to Colombia, and wound up in Kentucky as a result of transshipment via DHL's hub. The goods were in a secure designated customs area, where shipments are sorted for delivery, and as such they were never technically on US soil, and not subject to US laws regarding import/export.

Neither the shipper nor the consignee had any control of this transshipment, and US custom has no business meddling in shipments consigned from one sovereign nation to another. Any customs issues are fall under the laws of those nations. The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc), and to alert authorities in the consignee nation of the contraband.

In any case, the shipper had been busted before using the exact same method.

IOW, he's an idiot.

I'm sure that's what the owner will say when he shows up to contest the seizure of the hundreds of thousands of dollars he hid in tortilla rollers and shipped to Narco-topia.


In any case, it's the business of Colombia and/or Mexico, not of the US.

The US was just being a Good Neighbor.


We're a nosy neighbor with a bad habit of getting into other people's business, a habit that seems to be pissing more and more of the rest of the world off.


So.... is this Bush's fault... or Obama's?
 
2011-08-17 02:20:56 AM  

AqueousBoy: Tango_down: I just blue myself.

Okay, you know what you do? You buy yourself a tape recorder, you just record yourself for a whole day. I think you're going to be surprised at some of your phrasing.


Oh, Tobias. You blowhard!
 
2011-08-17 06:48:30 AM  

Amos Quito: The most the US should have been able to do is to inspect the goods for possible safety issues (bombs, etc)


So maybe that is what they were doing. You are saying it would be ok to interfere with it if it was a bomb? Even though it was destined for another country?

Your logic is flawed. Great links but study up on 19 CFR and border authority regarding searches.

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer's border search authority is derived from federal statutes and regulations, including 19 C.F.R. 162.6, which states that, "All persons, baggage and merchandise arriving in the Customs territory of the United States from places outside thereof are liable to inspection by a CBP officer."

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/admissibility/authority_to_search.xml
 
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