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(Washington Post)   Oldest Bataan Death March survivor, who was told by a doctor not to expect to reach 50 given his war experiences, dies at 105   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 102
    More: Hero, Bataan Death March, Bataan, World War II, Japan Ground Self-Defense Force, Council Bluffs, marchers, complaints, experiences  
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7195 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Aug 2011 at 9:10 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-08-15 08:55:30 PM
Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?
 
2011-08-15 09:11:54 PM
That's a long time to twirl. He must have really strong wrists.
 
2011-08-15 09:12:02 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


Grats, you're the new Skinnyhead.
 
2011-08-15 09:13:10 PM
I guess those surgeries that added 30-40 years to his life that he got in the future really outdid themselves.

/it's a sign you haven't RTFA if you don't get it
 
2011-08-15 09:14:21 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


he·ro
/ˈhɪəroʊ/ Show Spelled[heer-oh] Show IPA
noun, plural -roes; for 5 also -ros.
1.
a man of distinguished courage or ability, admired for his brave deeds and noble qualities.
2.
a person who, in the opinion of others, has heroic qualities or has performed a heroic act and is regarded as a model or ideal

You don't think either of those apply?
 
2011-08-15 09:15:09 PM

kleppe: You don't think either of those apply?


Well I don't know anything about the man. He might have those qualities. But merely surviving something horrific doesn't really qualify for either of those, no.
 
2011-08-15 09:16:38 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


Without the survivors the Japs could deny it ever took place.

There were no Simon Weisenthauls in Asia.
 
2011-08-15 09:17:45 PM
Whenever his friends would say "Hey, let's go for a walk" he would always say "No thanks!"
 
2011-08-15 09:17:52 PM

One Bad Apple: There were no Simon Weisenthauls in Asia.


That's interesting. I would actually bet there are, we just don't know about them.
 
2011-08-15 09:19:18 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


He survived tremendous odds and unspeakable horrors. He deserves a statue, but instead our society wants to give a statue for some drunkard killed at a ballgame: Link (new window)

/Sorry, but the guy killed at the Rangers game doesn't deserve a statue.
 
2011-08-15 09:19:19 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


I'd imagine many people would find it hard to live with themselves after such an experience, regardless of physical health. Survivor's guilt and all that. Also, from TFA, he documented the atrocities that the Japanese committed so that those who were responsible can be punished.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2011-08-15 09:19:20 PM
Brown, recognized in 2007 at an annual convention of Bataan survivors as the oldest one still living

Is it still a convention if there is only one person?
 
2011-08-15 09:19:26 PM
I woulda just used a smoke bomb and grappling hook to get outta there.
 
2011-08-15 09:19:48 PM

DamnYankees: kleppe: You don't think either of those apply?

Well I don't know anything about the man. He might have those qualities. But merely surviving something horrific doesn't really qualify for either of those, no.



Hahahaha...you're an a$$, but thanks for playing.
 
2011-08-15 09:20:45 PM

DamnYankees: kleppe: You don't think either of those apply?

Well I don't know anything about the man. He might have those qualities. But merely surviving something horrific doesn't really qualify for either of those, no.


RTFA. He lived a full life and made a difference to a lot of people. And if you want a specific act of heroism, while he was imprisoned by the Japanese for three and a half years he helped build a radio out of stolen parts to keep the other POWs morale up.
 
2011-08-15 09:22:34 PM
*salutes* Heaven, send a cab to bring 'em home, because you'd have to be a dick to make that man walk.
 
2011-08-15 09:23:00 PM
shiat, I'm one depressed SOB and I've had tons of opportunities and relatively little hardships. This guy suffered some serious atrocities and went on to live a long life. That's heroic in my book.
 
2011-08-15 09:25:47 PM
Great Scott!
 
2011-08-15 09:26:24 PM
i125.photobucket.com
 
2011-08-15 09:26:49 PM
My Great Grandad survived the Bataan Death March. He smuggled an American Flag with him all along. He was sent to a prisoner of war camp in Japan and was forced to work twisting barbed wire by hand in a Japanese factory. He kept that flag under his bandages the whole time, switching it around. When the war ended, they raised that flag over the POW camp. He never really talked about it. He drank a lot, beat his kids and hated the Japs. It really farked him up.

/csb over
 
2011-08-15 09:27:40 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


Obviously, you don't know what the Bataan Death March was. Look it up and then come back and apologize,
 
2011-08-15 09:28:51 PM
I tried to get in before "Sorry, not a hero!" but damn I had no chance this time.
 
2011-08-15 09:29:07 PM

shinjitsuism: DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?

He survived tremendous odds and unspeakable horrors. He deserves a statue, but instead our society wants to give a statue for some drunkard killed at a ballgame: Link (new window)

/Sorry, but the guy killed at the Rangers game doesn't deserve a statue.


It's because he was a fireman. They were all there on 9/11 you know.
 
2011-08-15 09:30:12 PM

cgraves67: My Great Grandad survived the Bataan Death March. He smuggled an American Flag with him all along. He was sent to a prisoner of war camp in Japan and was forced to work twisting barbed wire by hand in a Japanese factory. He kept that flag under his bandages the whole time, switching it around. When the war ended, they raised that flag over the POW camp. He never really talked about it. He drank a lot, beat his kids and hated the Japs. It really farked him up.

/csb over



www.zuguide.com

but seriously, my hat's off to him and all those like him.
 
2011-08-15 09:31:05 PM

ZAZ: Brown, recognized in 2007 at an annual convention of Bataan survivors as the oldest one still living

Is it still a convention if there is only one person?


I know you're snarking but you realize that by being the oldest, there could still be survivors younger than him that are still living as well?
 
2011-08-15 09:31:28 PM
www.myremoteradio.com
RIP Doc Brown
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2011-08-15 09:33:28 PM
On further consideration, my comment indeed made no sense.
 
2011-08-15 09:34:14 PM
jrscience.wcp.muohio.edu

What I want to know is how he marched with such huge balls between his legs.

/sleep well, soldier
 
2011-08-15 09:36:42 PM

Arkanaut: DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?

I'd imagine many people would find it hard to live with themselves after such an experience, regardless of physical health. Survivor's guilt and all that. Also, from TFA, he documented the atrocities that the Japanese committed so that those who were responsible can be punished.


My sister's father-in-law was captured in the Philippines and spent the war in a Japanese POW camp. When he went to sleep every night he was back in the camp and would wake up sweating and screaming. He lasted about 20 years before he took his own life.
 
2011-08-15 09:37:28 PM
Regretfully removes DamnYankees from favorites list...
 
2011-08-15 09:38:46 PM
A family friend also survived the Death March. He was made to watch the beheading of his brother. Needless to say, he wasn't the biggest fan of the Japanese. No one in his immediate family bought anything made in Japan; he was kind of a stickler about that.

And DamnYankees you are a douche.
 
2011-08-15 09:42:27 PM

DamnYankees: kleppe: You don't think either of those apply?

Well I don't know anything about the man. He might have those qualities. But merely surviving something horrific doesn't really qualify for either of those, no.


That's actually a valid point in and of itself. His heroic acts involved helping other people, but simply surviving the march by itself is not heroic (though it's still impressive).
 
2011-08-15 09:42:47 PM

spammuncher: A family friend also survived the Death March. He was made to watch the beheading of his brother. Needless to say, he wasn't the biggest fan of the Japanese. No one in his immediate family bought anything made in Japan; he was kind of a stickler about that.

And DamnYankees you are a douche.


Call me a douche all you want if it makes you feel better.

My grandfather was in a very similar position as your family friend. You can also add in my grandmother, a German Jew who had to escape her home in 1940. I don't speak from a lack of personal history on these matters. But I was raised to understand that war is not a wondrous place where people are heroes and men are giants. Some people are heroes, and some men are giants, but most of them were just scared people trying to get home as best they could. There's no shame in there. There's humanity in that, and there's respectability in that. But that's not heroism. Don't confuse survival with heroism.
 
2011-08-15 09:44:51 PM
One Bad Apple: There were no Simon Weisenthauls in Asia.

you mean simon wiesenthaul's smart ass cousin? he was a draught dodger wasn't he?

/r.i.p. doc
 
2011-08-15 09:46:04 PM
What kind of idiot trolls a thread celebrating the life of an American soldier who survived the Bataan Death March...

Seriously. Your douchebaggery knows no bounds. Eat a dick, diaf.
 
2011-08-15 09:46:43 PM

RichieLaw: Eat a dick, diaf.


I guess I'd be a hero if I did...
 
2011-08-15 09:47:27 PM
Hats off to you, sir. My great uncle survived the same march, only to die after returning home due to complications of the anesthetic during a routine surgery. Glad to see someone beating the odds.
 
2011-08-15 09:49:19 PM

Satanic_Hamster: DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?

Grats, you're the new Skinnyhead.


Worse... he's the new DamnYan... oh wait.
 
2011-08-15 09:50:25 PM

DamnYankees: spammuncher: A family friend also survived the Death March. He was made to watch the beheading of his brother. Needless to say, he wasn't the biggest fan of the Japanese. No one in his immediate family bought anything made in Japan; he was kind of a stickler about that.

And DamnYankees you are a douche.

Call me a douche all you want if it makes you feel better.

My grandfather was in a very similar position as your family friend. You can also add in my grandmother, a German Jew who had to escape her home in 1940. I don't speak from a lack of personal history on these matters. But I was raised to understand that war is not a wondrous place where people are heroes and men are giants. Some people are heroes, and some men are giants, but most of them were just scared people trying to get home as best they could. There's no shame in there. There's humanity in that, and there's respectability in that. But that's not heroism. Don't confuse survival with heroism.


^^ That.
 
2011-08-15 09:51:56 PM
Look up the circumstances that led to the Bataan Death March. These guys fought a losing battle hard as all out, and instead of evacuating sacrificed themselves providing a delaying action so MacArthur could feel good about himself. Even the Japanese were surprised at how hard these dudes fought and how long they held out.
 
2011-08-15 09:55:17 PM
meanwhile no one in charge gives a damn, continues the sick twisted mindless cruelty of the suffering, death and destruction of war. i like to bust balls as much as anybody but this makes me weep. it never ends. goddammitsomuch

/welcome to fark. i'm fat, too.

//get off my peace-loving lawn
 
2011-08-15 09:55:58 PM
I'm sorry he's dead. I would've liked to buy him a beer.
 
2011-08-15 10:03:35 PM
Damn Yankees?

No, you are a Damn Idiot
 
2011-08-15 10:04:52 PM

DamnYankees: Some people are heroes, and some men are giants, but most of them were just scared people trying to get home as best they could. There's no shame in there. There's humanity in that, and there's respectability in that. But that's not heroism. Don't confuse survival with heroism.


You DO actually make a valid point. Unfortunately, it kind of came off rather clumsily at first.
 
2011-08-15 10:05:12 PM
*dodges the trolls to post this*

ekd.com

If you ever wondered what happened to all the other Death March survivors, go see this movie. Badass
 
2011-08-15 10:08:51 PM

DamnYankees:

Call me a douche all you want if it makes you feel better.

My grandfather was in a very similar position as your family friend. You can also add in my grandmother, a German Jew who had to escape her home in 1940. I don't speak from a lack of personal history on these matters. But I was raised to understand that war is not a wondrous place where people are heroes and men are giants. Some people are heroes, and some men are giants, but most of them were just scared people trying to get home as best they could. There's no shame in there. There's humanity in that, and there's respectability in that. But that's not heroism. Don't confuse survival with heroism.


See, normally I'd agree with you. But in this case, the atrocities that occurred on the death march and afterwards were SO great, that to survive, one must have been heroic; the act of survival in this instance required such courage, such fortitude of spirit, an indomitable will to survive against insurmountable odds and unimaginable cruelties, that it itself was an heroic act.
It would have been easy to just give up and die. It is what any normal person would and did do. There is no shame for those that could not hang on, and just did what the Japanese wanted, and died. Likewise, those whose injuries alone killed them.

Those who managed to survive, whose courage lasted out, whose will to live beat the countless attempts to snuff them out, are truly heroes.
 
2011-08-15 10:11:05 PM

Wizard Drongo: See, normally I'd agree with you. But in this case, the atrocities that occurred on the death march and afterwards were SO great, that to survive, one must have been heroic; the act of survival in this instance required such courage, such fortitude of spirit, an indomitable will to survive against insurmountable odds and unimaginable cruelties, that it itself was an heroic act.


I just can't agree with this. Is every person who survived the Battle of Stalingrad a hero? The Siege of Leningrad? Rape of Nanking? Battle of Berlin?

The survival instinct is strong, my friend.

Wizard Drongo: It is what any normal person would and did do.


I don't agree. People don't survive these atrocities because they were braver or stronger. Most of them survived because they were LUCKIER. And the first people to tell you that are the survivors themselves.
 
2011-08-15 10:11:36 PM
Some people get off on questioning the qualities of their betters.
 
2011-08-15 10:16:05 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


Uh, you know I love you, but really, dude, they didn't call it the Bataan DEATH March for nothing. Plus, there was the DEATH CAMP waiting at the end of the March. And no, (well, imo) just surviving something may not make you a hero; but surviving something that was designed to KILL YOU may well make you a hero. Scott O'Grady was not necessarily a hero (though the Marines who went to get him were); the dorks who keep freezing and dying up on Everest are not heroes (though anyone who helps bring them down may be); but anyone who lives through something called a DEATH MARCH and then a DEATH CAMP has got something heroic inside of them.

But I'm not going to beat you up about it. "Hero" is one of those overused words in modern society, which I believe was your point.
 
2011-08-15 10:20:25 PM

DamnYankees: Not to be that guy, but how is this guy a hero for surviving the Bataan Death March?


Anyone who can struggle by just one of their friends being bayoneted up the asshole because they were too sick and fell out of the march is a hero. Men in the march saw this happen often. Not just once.

Feel free to repeat the feat anytime. You'll have to find someone as depraved as either the Japanese soldiers or the Korean-Japanese conscripts. Good luck.
 
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