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(Fox News)   95% of law school graduates get a job within six months of graduation. Some job. Any job. Suing the law school for example. Would you like fries with that?   (foxnews.com) divider line 173
    More: Unlikely, New York Law School, New York Supreme Court, law schools, graduates  
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8465 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Aug 2011 at 6:36 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-08-11 07:31:15 PM

Peki: RexTalionis: Law school Colleges routinely lie or embellish their employment numbers to attract new students who think they're going to earn $140K right out of school. Little do they realize that the average salary for a new lawyer any graduate is something like $50K $20K.

FTFY.

My fav was when my college told me I owed $150 on my tuition. After I had already paid two months in advance.

/Dean who obviously had heard the rant before pointed to the "Tuition rates may be changed by the State legislature at any time with no notice" line in the class schedule.


I find that very funny. Sounds like they got started pretty early on "educating" you.
 
2011-08-11 07:31:55 PM
I graduated from law school at age 40 in 1994. I got paid less than it cost to park my car in my first job. Frankly, that's all a new lawyer is worth. You learn to be a lawyer by being a lawyer, not through law school. Here's to bringing back apprenticeships.
 
2011-08-11 07:32:15 PM

wee: Love that last line: "The number they gave out isn't the real number, and so if they did disclose the real number it'd be different. But we don't know how much different it'd be so we're just going to make up a number. Oh yeah, and we'll prove to you that we don't know what the actual number is by concluding with a statement that the number we just pulled out of our ass might not even be as bad as we're trying to claim it is."

Beg the question much?


You mean raises the....

...oh, wait. You might be the first one on the internet to use it correctly.
 
2011-08-11 07:36:02 PM
I stayed in-state for law school. Tuition is only about $14k a year and I'll end up with about $50k in debt. But I fully realize if I stay in NE I'll be making about $55k tops starting at a private firm. That's manageable, and I'll still be able to have a really good standard of living. If I'd gone to Creighton, tuition is over $35k a year and it's still not as good a school as UNL. I had more scholarship money there, but the difference in tuition was still so substantial that I went with UNL instead. Some law students just live in this fantasy land where they think a law degree is a golden ticket so they rack up ridiculous debt thinking they'll walk into a dream job and all will be well. Not so much for most people.

I do agree - there are too many law schools and the ABA should know better than to accredit a bunch of these new fourth-tier schools. Even decent schools like Creighton are reducing class sizes due to competition. When I was applying, I got tons of free apps from joke schools like Golden State, Ohio Northern, Charlotte, etc. I'd say this - have a good idea what your goals are (just don't do it to kill time or expect a pay day after three years) and get into a reputable school in the state or region you want to practice.
 
2011-08-11 07:36:59 PM

MorrisBird: I graduated from law school at age 40 in 1994. I got paid less than it cost to park my car in my first job. Frankly, that's all a new lawyer is worth. You learn to be a lawyer by being a lawyer, not through law school. Here's to bringing back apprenticeships.


You learn pretty much everything that way. Anyone that thinks they learned something in college is probably teaching.
 
2011-08-11 07:38:10 PM

RexTalionis: Even if your annual salary is $80K, if you work 70 hours a week, that comes out to about $21 dollars an hour, which is not fantastic, considering your level of education.


One nice thing about being a lawyer is that you are always able to just hang out a shingle and work for yourself. You'd have to hustle your ass off to drum up business, but in theory a lawyer has good job security, since you can always make a living without being someone's employee. Hell, even if someone were to only be a court-appointed criminal lawyer (would have to do it in a few different counties to get enough assignments) and do cases that paid a few hundred bucks a pop, they could scratch out a living. Not too many professions can do that.

The downside is that lots of young lawyers are having to do this, and since law school teaches nothing about how to actually be a lawyer, they don't know what the fark they're doing most of the time.
 
2011-08-11 07:39:33 PM
Man Im so glad I didnt go to law school. I was a pols/ pre law undergrad during the better half of the 2000s when you were able to willy eyed about your future career. After 7 years of college and combat tours I was like "screw that!", im gonna wait a few years a until grinding out those lsats.

Pretty much every law grad I know is having a hard time right now plus a mountain of debt. Im not talking about the idiots here either, some of them were very bright and got very targetted legal degrees at the top of their class, they assumed would always be in demand. Now the good ones are making 36k or more, but most are only getting temp work for 10 bucks an hour. Some got unrelated jobs with the state or municipalities. I probably know only a few who actually got real legal careers in the 70k+ range. Its almost like you'd be better off leaving it off your resume as most assume your over qualified while the legal jobs arent hiring.

Im thinking switching careers to an MBA, yeah yeah i know, but im on pretty great career path right now with lots of experience and connections. Especially considering my poli sci degree. Atleast i went to a good school, and no debt. But who knows maybe all my college buddies will chillen on their yaghts 5 years from now.
 
2011-08-11 07:40:27 PM
As someone about to start school and will graduate with little or no debt, I'm getting a kick out of these replies...
 
2011-08-11 07:41:30 PM

ignatius_crumbcake: One nice thing about being a lawyer is that you are always able to just hang out a shingle and work for yourself. You'd have to hustle your ass off to drum up business, but in theory a lawyer has good job security, since you can always make a living without being someone's employee. Hell, even if someone were to only be a court-appointed criminal lawyer (would have to do it in a few different counties to get enough assignments) and do cases that paid a few hundred bucks a pop, they could scratch out a living. Not too many professions can do that.


One of my best buds from law school did this and has finally managed to get his profession off the ground after 2 years of herculean effort. And it cost him his time, his health (he had a mini-stroke in the meantime) and his sanity.
 
2011-08-11 07:41:48 PM

Rent Party: MorrisBird: I graduated from law school at age 40 in 1994. I got paid less than it cost to park my car in my first job. Frankly, that's all a new lawyer is worth. You learn to be a lawyer by being a lawyer, not through law school. Here's to bringing back apprenticeships.

You learn pretty much everything that way. Anyone that thinks they learned something in college is probably teaching.


Not only are they teaching, they've never practiced in the profession they teach.
 
2011-08-11 07:42:24 PM

Rent Party: MorrisBird: I graduated from law school at age 40 in 1994. I got paid less than it cost to park my car in my first job. Frankly, that's all a new lawyer is worth. You learn to be a lawyer by being a lawyer, not through law school. Here's to bringing back apprenticeships.

You learn pretty much everything that way. Anyone that thinks they learned something in college is probably teaching.


Yeah, no shiat there. I got my MD back in June and have probably learned more in the first 2 months of residency than in the past 4 years... at least in terms of practical knowledge. If not for the post-grad training, an MD is COMPLETELY useless.

/at least I will have job prospects in a few years.
//Psychiatry... and crazy isn't going away.
 
2011-08-11 07:43:25 PM

The_Terminator: Out of curiosity, given I know fark-all about post-law job opportunities, what kind of salary would someone in the middle of their class at, say, Harvard Law School, expect to make after graduation?

And would this job involve working 80+hr weeks and basically having to forego all contact with the outside world to maintain/advance in pay/position?


Can't answer the first question, but the answer to the second is "yes" regardless of school quality, class rank, or starting salary.

If you want work/life balance, you don't go into law.

Guntram Shatterhand: Sorry, did I get in before the 'you make money doing this (exception that doesn't prove the rule)' or 'my job PAID for my masters (back in the '90s when there wasn't a labor surplus created by big business to lower wages across the scale)?'


It's Fark. EVERY thread is full of nothing but "My life is awesome, everyone should just make the same decisions that I did and they'd be equally successful" or "My life sucks, therefore anyone who made the same choices that I did is condemned to failure" posts. No one really likes to admit how much of a role sheer chance plays in their lives.

I mean, look at me, barely 21 and I'm already a billionaire who has multiple threesomes a day with different supermodels each time. I certainly don't expect that anyone else could share my success just by steering a failing Fortune 500 company from the edge of bankruptcy to a truly ludicrous level of profitability.
 
2011-08-11 07:44:04 PM

ignatius_crumbcake: RexTalionis: Even if your annual salary is $80K, if you work 70 hours a week, that comes out to about $21 dollars an hour, which is not fantastic, considering your level of education.

One nice thing about being a lawyer is that you are always able to just hang out a shingle and work for yourself. You'd have to hustle your ass off to drum up business, but in theory a lawyer has good job security, since you can always make a living without being someone's employee. Hell, even if someone were to only be a court-appointed criminal lawyer (would have to do it in a few different counties to get enough assignments) and do cases that paid a few hundred bucks a pop, they could scratch out a living. Not too many professions can do that.

The downside is that lots of young lawyers are having to do this, and since law school teaches nothing about how to actually be a lawyer, they don't know what the fark they're doing most of the time.


I've been a sole practitioner since 95, pretty much all my friends who are lawyers are also sole practitioners, the competition for business is pretty fierce and the amount you get paid is constantly declining. Only way to make big money is personal injury but I probably don't have to tell you how much marketing goes into getting those cases.

I'm pretty close to retiring (10 more years tops) so I don't really give a rat's ass but anyone who takes that route these days has his head up his ass.
 
2011-08-11 07:44:24 PM

Transubstantive: Top tier law school grad here. Graduated in top 15% of my class, still finding it difficult to get any job that doesn't pay 40-50k. Sorry, but I have 250k in debt so 50k doesn't really help much.

/2 months out, 4 more months til loan repayment begins!
//don't be a lawyer


As someone entering their 3L year, I dread graduation.
 
2011-08-11 07:44:34 PM
Why don't they start their own practice? That is what I did. First year I was making about 1.5 times the average starting salary (even after expenses) in the market I lived in, and it cotinues to go up. While most associates are working late nights and weekends, I average 45 hours a week, unless preparing for or during a trial.

I literally turn away enough cases (in areas of the law I prefer not to practice - PI, comp, divorce) that could support one or two attorneys. I usually refer them to young attorneys who are building their practices.

It is probably easier to start a successful law practice than any other sites successful business, if you are not afraid of a little work, you treat your clients with respect AND return ALL of your calls before you go home each night.
 
2011-08-11 07:45:22 PM

jagec: I mean, look at me, barely 21 and I'm already a billionaire who has multiple threesomes a day with different supermodels each time. I certainly don't expect that anyone else could share my success just by steering a failing Fortune 500 company from the edge of bankruptcy to a truly ludicrous level of profitability


I can tell you're good with money. You don't have a TotalFark account.
 
2011-08-11 07:46:29 PM

jmr61: AcneVulgaris: DamnYankees: RexTalionis: Law school routinely lie or embellish their employment numbers to attract new students who think they're going to earn $140K right out of school. Little do they realize that the average salary for a new lawyer is something like $50K.

50K is still an average living, nothing to sneer at.

Unless it comes with 150k of non-dischargeable debt.


I'm a 25 year experienced mortgage banker (yeah, that's another matter) and i see people in so many fields come out of college with 5-10 times in debt what they are earning annually in their first jobs. My collegues and I just shake our heads and ask ourselves what they were thinking.

That is doing one thing though that people may not realize. We are creating a couple of generations (or more) of youngsters who cannot think about buying a home until that student loan debt is substantially gone. And maybe that's not a bad thing except of course for the parents that they will be living with.


It's been sold as 'good debt', just like with houses.
 
2011-08-11 07:46:37 PM

Longtime Lurker: Rent Party: MorrisBird: I graduated from law school at age 40 in 1994. I got paid less than it cost to park my car in my first job. Frankly, that's all a new lawyer is worth. You learn to be a lawyer by being a lawyer, not through law school. Here's to bringing back apprenticeships.

You learn pretty much everything that way. Anyone that thinks they learned something in college is probably teaching.

Yeah, no shiat there. I got my MD back in June and have probably learned more in the first 2 months of residency than in the past 4 years... at least in terms of practical knowledge. If not for the post-grad training, an MD is COMPLETELY useless.

/at least I will have job prospects in a few years.
//Psychiatry... and crazy isn't going away.


A senior executive at the company I work for is a medical doctor. Used to be a trauma surgeon in a major metropolitan area. Guy is smart and good at his job. He said to me "You know what I learned in medical school? Latin words for anatomy."

Made me laugh.
 
2011-08-11 07:49:35 PM
scottydoesntknow
EuphoniumEuphoria: Trade schools. Apprenticeships. Bring them back.

I'm sure you've seen it but: Mike Rowe speaks to Congress regarding trades/"Dirty Jobs" (new window)

Very interesting and cool. Basically he's saying that America has turned their focus away from hard working jobs like carpentry and manual labor in favor of a desk job, not realizing the only way that desk got there was by "dirty jobs". The pay is too low for people to want to work these "dirty jobs" and you see a shortage in people working trades which causes other sectors to suffer.


Anybody who seriously makes the argument in 2011 that "the pay is too low for people to work" should have their penis ground up in a garbage disposal and be forced to eat it afterwards.
 
2011-08-11 07:49:43 PM

velvet_fog: I stayed in-state for law school. Tuition is only about $14k a year and I'll end up with about $50k in debt. But I fully realize if I stay in NE I'll be making about $55k tops starting at a private firm. That's manageable, and I'll still be able to have a really good standard of living. If I'd gone to Creighton, tuition is over $35k a year and it's still not as good a school as UNL. I had more scholarship money there, but the difference in tuition was still so substantial that I went with UNL instead. Some law students just live in this fantasy land where they think a law degree is a golden ticket so they rack up ridiculous debt thinking they'll walk into a dream job and all will be well. Not so much for most people.

I do agree - there are too many law schools and the ABA should know better than to accredit a bunch of these new fourth-tier schools. Even decent schools like Creighton are reducing class sizes due to competition. When I was applying, I got tons of free apps from joke schools like Golden State, Ohio Northern, Charlotte, etc. I'd say this - have a good idea what your goals are (just don't do it to kill time or expect a pay day after three years) and get into a reputable school in the state or region you want to practice.


The same could be said about every profession out there that requires a degree. Universities are no longer a place to teach people as much as they are a business. And since the loans are non-chargeable at bankruptcy, universities have no incentive to actually apply any standards as to which students they accept. Now I say that as a whole fully aware that top universities do have standards but there is a university out there even for people with GED and a average score on tests.

Change the law so student loans can be discharged at bankruptcy and you'll see those universities that are just diploma mills go under and the reputation of a university will be based on the ability of their graduates to pay the loans - ie get their money's worth out of the college education.
 
2011-08-11 07:50:25 PM
looks like i accidentally the whole thing.
 
2011-08-11 07:51:31 PM

JeffreyScott: It is probably easier to start a successful law practice than any other sites successful business, if you are not afraid of a little work, you treat your clients with respect AND return ALL of your calls before you go home each night.


I agree, and have friends who did the same thing and are doing pretty well now after a few years.

The problem is that starting your own firm is a lot of work and stress. Too many new graduates think that the JD is automatically gonna get them a corner office with a minibar and a big enough salary for a powder blue Mercedes.

When my firm made our job posting we asked people to send their salary requirements. We had brand new graduates, some who hadn't even taken the July bar yet, asking for $80k a year.
 
2011-08-11 07:52:08 PM
95% of the world hates your blog, Murdoch
 
2011-08-11 07:52:53 PM

Free Range Deranged: The engineer with security clearance is making big money in the defense industry, being paid with your taxes and the debt his own kids will have to pay back. They aren't paying him, his kids are just loaning him the money.


Actually, my taxes (income, sales, property, etc) work out to about 50% of my gross, so basically 100% of my tax dollars go to my salary. It's also not big money, it's adequate money. I'm not in it for the money, I do it because I like it and I'm good at it.

My first job out of school didn't pay that much but I figured that if I spent 5 months looking for a job that paid $10k more, I'd lose a lot more cash.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2011-08-11 07:53:12 PM

LanguageLikeBonsais: You might be the first one on the internet to use it correctly.


Thanks! I've always been fond of the old-school logical fallacies. A good, honest no true Scotsman is my favorite, but I'm always on the lookout for questions being begged.
 
2011-08-11 07:53:14 PM

ddam: Change the law so student loans can be discharged at bankruptcy


That was the law before 2005. Toilet schools like Cooley still existed then.
 
2011-08-11 07:55:28 PM
I think we're missing the point here. The obvious key to success in the legal world is to accept Satan's offer and sire the Antichrist with your half-sister.
 
2011-08-11 07:57:28 PM

BigNumber12: I think we're missing the point here. The obvious key to success in the legal world is to accept Satan's offer and sire the Antichrist with your half-sister.


Vanity, gets them every time.
 
2011-08-11 07:58:08 PM

chu2dogg: Anybody who seriously makes the argument in 2011 that "the pay is too low for people to work in DIRTY JOBS" should have their penis ground up in a garbage disposal and be forced to eat it afterwards.



It has nothing to do with the current pay of those jobs (which are okay), there's no incentive or motivation to go for these jobs when everyone says you can "go to lawyer school and nab a 100K desk job"

Trades have fallen by the wayside in pursuit of the easiest/laziest "American Dream".
 
2011-08-11 07:58:42 PM

BigNumber12: I think we're missing the point here. The obvious key to success in the legal world is to accept Satan's offer and sire the Antichrist with your half-sister.


Damn it - I don't have a half sister. Now who do I fark?
 
2011-08-11 08:01:00 PM
The Entitlement Generation has not a clue how the real world works.
 
2011-08-11 08:01:00 PM

Teiritzamna: Now who do I fark?


Submitter's mom.
 
2011-08-11 08:01:49 PM

MorrisBird: Teiritzamna: Now who do I fark?

Submitter's mom.


Crap . . . I hate long lines.
 
2011-08-11 08:02:00 PM

Vega.: I'm getting a kick out of these replies since I'm a law school grad who hasn't had a real job since graduating and passing the bar, about a year now.

/Had a 4.5 month temporary job that the law school paid my employer to pay me so they could bump their employment numbers up, but that's it.
//130k in debt
///Anybody hiring in Oregon?




img.docstoccdn.com
 
2011-08-11 08:02:17 PM

scottydoesntknow: chu2dogg: Anybody who seriously makes the argument in 2011 that "the pay is too low for people to work in DIRTY JOBS" should have their penis ground up in a garbage disposal and be forced to eat it afterwards.


It has nothing to do with the current pay of those jobs (which are okay), there's no incentive or motivation to go for these jobs when everyone says you can "go to lawyer school and nab a 100K desk job"

Trades have fallen by the wayside in pursuit of the easiest/laziest "American Dream".


I tell people who want to get into Engineering for the money to take up a trade instead, since they'll make more money faster.
 
2011-08-11 08:06:28 PM
Any of you lawyers want some work? I have a job for you.

Sue this guy (new window) for me. Malpractice. I've tried a bunch of bigger law firms and none of them want to take the risk (crooked bastards). But if you are bored or out-of-work, what do you have to lose????

Brief case details here (new window).

Difficulty: Statute of limitations crap in Indiana requires a filing by Oct. 2, two years from the date the incident began.
 
2011-08-11 08:14:49 PM

scottydoesntknow: chu2dogg: Anybody who seriously makes the argument in 2011 that "the pay is too low for people to work in DIRTY JOBS" should have their penis ground up in a garbage disposal and be forced to eat it afterwards.


It has nothing to do with the current pay of those jobs (which are okay), there's no incentive or motivation to go for these jobs when everyone says you can "go to lawyer school and nab a 100K desk job"

Trades have fallen by the wayside in pursuit of the easiest/laziest "American Dream".


You sir can step right up to the penis grinding station.

The U.S. actually has some of the lowest rates of higher education in the industrial world. Plenty of countries do just fine finding skilled mechanics that might have a 4 year degree.

The real problem is that apprenticeships are almost unheard of nowadays. Which is only a symptom of the much larger problem: employers at large aren't willing to invest in their work force. They say: "go to a 2 year trade school". So you do, then they say "go get 2 years of experience", so you dick around in temp work and contacting jobs for a couple years before landing a full time job with benefits. Then they say "go learn x, y, z" which you attend night school to keep up with the promotions while they bill your services out at $150 an hour while paying 10.50 and have quarterly reviews on your 15 cent an hour raise.

These are all things employers used to invest in and teach their employees to instill pride and loyalty.

This is also part of the whole education bubble. Routine office support jobs that decades ago would have only required a high school education now all require a college degree. In anything.

The reason is simple: because they can.

We have a labor surplus because we've swallowed a huge section of immigrant labor depressing unskilled wages. We've outsourced almost all of our technical jobs overseas so that a good third of population is unemployed, underemployed, or employed but calculating school, or career shift or something else that is higher earning.

By a comparison a friend of mine, the foreign equivalent of a high school drop out, emigrated to Australia.. He recently got his first job.... at McDonalds. 17 bucks an hour.

That's what you get when you don't have a labor surplus.

That's really all there is too it.

/also "lazy"??? U.S also works the most amount of hours per week. Let me know when we get to take the month of August off.
 
2011-08-11 08:21:21 PM
A master's degree in statistics is where the money is right now I've completed 2 of the 3 semesters and my internship pays $1300 a week. I find out tomorrow if I get an offer for full time which pays 70k. Everyone in my program has tuition waived for being a TA. Don't think I'm at a top school either, UTK if you are interested check out the business analytics department, soms.utk.edu

/ not paid to be a spokesperson
 
2011-08-11 08:21:39 PM

chu2dogg: /also "lazy"??? U.S also works the most amount of hours per week. Let me know when we get to take the month of August off.


We're actually one of the few countries with no limits on how many hours people can work. And there are people who think working 60 to 70 hours a week is just fine. As for the education thing, keep in mind in America a lot of people don't get the idea of learning for the sake of learning. Or why it's a good thing to have people doing that.
 
2011-08-11 08:23:25 PM

Transubstantive: Top tier law school grad here. Graduated in top 15% of my class, still finding it difficult to get any job that doesn't pay 40-50k. Sorry, but I have 250k in debt so 50k doesn't really help much.

/2 months out, 4 more months til loan repayment begins!
//don't be a lawyer


I would think a top tier school would weed out the stupid ones but what do I know, I am just now starting to work on my Bachelors degree...
 
2011-08-11 08:25:23 PM
Here's the math in my office (state employees): Starting salary is $48k. Average debt from local (2nd tier) law school is $150k, disregarding any undergrad loans (if you are lucky) and bar loans (diploma privilege). Income growth is negative, when adjusted for inflation, thank you Scooter Walker.

Bottom line? Recent grads qualify for deferment (don't have to make payments, but interest accrues) but not forebearance. If they stay with our office, they will never have to make a student loan payment, but will also never get a car loan or mortgage, as interest accumulates at $9k a year to start with.

Thank goodness Walker made State employees pay their fair share.
 
2011-08-11 08:25:42 PM
In most countries law is an undergrad degree. Also students aren't put in much, if any debt, to get the degree. The US could take the hint. Not that it will.
 
2011-08-11 08:29:11 PM

WhyteRaven74: chu2dogg: /also "lazy"??? U.S also works the most amount of hours per week. Let me know when we get to take the month of August off.

We're actually one of the few countries with no limits on how many hours people can work. And there are people who think working 60 to 70 hours a week is just fine. As for the education thing, keep in mind in America a lot of people don't get the idea of learning for the sake of learning. Or why it's a good thing to have people doing that.


Yeah but if you are bringing in 100K in undissolved debt it probably is a good idea to make sure up front there is a return on your investment. All those countries that do pride learning for the sake of learning have tax-payer supported and regulated educational institutions. So it's probably more likely somebody can get a degree in psychology, then kind of drift off and figure they should really a plumber and work with their hands. While the psych student here has 50k in debt and are searching frantically for relevent work in their career field.

Meanwhile they all still bilk dumbass Americans 20 grand for a farking semester! It's like anywhere you go in the world everybody knows and takes advantage of the stupidity of the average American with their money.
 
2011-08-11 08:30:14 PM
I just don't get how it's 100% completely unethical to do anything that has a hint of making a misrepresentation to a potential client, but if you're a Dean of a Law School it's standard procedure to misrepresent the shiat out of what recent graduates are making

/$50 k would be a wet dream for most
 
2011-08-11 08:36:06 PM

BallZach: Any of you lawyers want some work? I have a job for you.

Sue this guy (new window) for me. Malpractice. I've tried a bunch of bigger law firms and none of them want to take the risk (crooked bastards). But if you are bored or out-of-work, what do you have to lose????

Brief case details here (new window).

Difficulty: Statute of limitations crap in Indiana requires a filing by Oct. 2, two years from the date the incident began.


Tl;DR. There are plenty of ambulance chasers advertising on late night t.v. that would be happy to file a medical malpractice suit for you in exchange for 40% of your recovery. You'll have to cough up a few thousand upfront for costs, of course, but if you're angry enough to write War & Peace 2: Kneecap Boogaloo, I'm sure a few grand is worth it to you for you to have your "day in court" (i.e. maybe you'll get to depose some PA or something) before you settle for nuisance value. But who knows, maybe you've got a goldmine there and you'll score a few million in damages and your name will become a household word like "Miranda" and "Gideon" and "Roe."
 
2011-08-11 08:39:42 PM

Phlem Pickens: The Entitlement Generation has not a clue how the real world works.


Their future has been borrowed and spent. Their real world is grinding poverty and debt. They were born with it, like original sin.
 
2011-08-11 08:41:21 PM
I just did the math on $150,000 at 5% for 30 years. Monthly payment is $805.

/Student loans dischargeable in death
//Fake yer own death for profit!
 
2011-08-11 08:43:12 PM
I'm currently heading into my 3L year at my local state law school.

My grand total for three years in law school: about $500 for books.

And I still feel like I got kinda ripped off. Although to be fair, I'm really doing it more as a hobby, and spending less than a thousand bucks indulging your hobby over 3 years is actually pretty cheap.

If anyone's interested you can read the entire complaint here. (new window)

It's pretty damning.

At this point, I've been telling people you should only go to Law School under a few very select conditions:
1. You or your family is wealthy and can finance you without it hurting;
2. You get a full scholarship covering 100% of tuition;
3. You get into one of the Top 10; or
4. You love the law. Love with a capital "L". Like the way a fat kid loves cupcakes.
 
2011-08-11 08:44:42 PM

Phlem Pickens: The Entitlement Generation has not a clue how the real world works.


Baby Boomers?

Yeah.. I probably agree.

/kind of weird they still haven't figured it out in their 50's and 60's
//most of us figured it out in a year or two tops.
 
2011-08-11 08:45:19 PM
fark all these entitled assholes. I didn't go to law school. Know what I did? I majored in Psychology. Did a good job, too. My senior year of undergrad I managed to take 6 classes, work 2 jobs, and get research published that I presented at an APA conference (now in a text book). I got a job after graduation for $18,500 running group homes for psychotic adults. When I figured I couldn't make ends meet let alone move outof my parents' house and pay for grad school (my original goal) I fell back on my minor in comp sci and went into tech. I hustled. I worked. I didn't look for a farking hand out.

A friend of mine graduated from law school and when he couldn't get a job he said "fark it, I'm putting up my shingle" and he started his own practice. He worked and starved for 5 years and now he's in very high demand and making a great living.

If I was a partner in a firm I would blacklist every one ofthese farkers and make sure they didn't get hired anywhere. I want people who work for what they get, not exist under the idea that going through the motions entitles you to what very few people get to enjoy in this world: financial freedom and guaranteed employment.

Sorry. Touchy subject.
 
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