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(Canoe)   If you're innocent and in prison, check to see if your buddy actually committed your crime. Elmo Blatch surrenders   (cnews.canoe.ca) divider line 45
    More: PSA  
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7340 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Sep 2003 at 12:29 AM (11 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



45 Comments   (+0 »)
   

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2003-09-07 12:31:36 AM  
Shawshanked

/Tim Robbins
 
2003-09-07 12:32:12 AM  
Kimberly Shay Ruffner?

Someone's getting raped.
 
2003-09-07 12:34:42 AM  
Wait! I own this movie!
 
2003-09-07 12:35:57 AM  
 
2003-09-07 12:36:13 AM  
" width="320" height="240">
 
2003-09-07 12:36:45 AM  
 
2003-09-07 12:36:52 AM  
 
2003-09-07 12:38:53 AM  

"I wonder what he's thinking now," said Bloodsworth, adding he now considers (Kimberly Shay) Ruffner a coward. "They got him. All his punishment's coming."


Well, life ain't easy for a boy named Kimberly.


 
2003-09-07 12:43:39 AM  
Zihuatanejo
 
2003-09-07 12:44:04 AM  
nice movie reference...


How often to you really look at a man's shoes??
 
2003-09-07 12:45:33 AM  
How often to you really look at a man's shoes??

Never. Unless you've got teh ghei.

/see a doctor and get rid of it
 
2003-09-07 12:48:23 AM  
Did you ever notice that prosecutors never admit making mistakes? Ever.
/Andy Rooney
 
2003-09-07 12:50:31 AM  
"Prosecutors are certain this time they have the right man, said O'Connor, whose office wrongly convicted Bloodsworth twice."

Yes, folks. TWICE. Think about the horror (THE HORROR) that must've been. Nine years in that pee-pee soaked heck-hole.

I wonder how many folks were put to death or sentenced to life wrongly before DNA evidence came to light.
 
2003-09-07 12:51:38 AM  
"Thank god for DNA"

ok...
 
2003-09-07 12:53:52 AM  
At the risk of turning this into an anti/pro death penalty flamewar, I'd just like to say that, IMHO, the problem of wrongful convictions prevents me from EVER supporting the death penalty.

If it's better to let 10 guilty men go free then to send 1 innocent man to prison, I'd suggest that it's better to let 1000 guilty men go free than to put 1 innocent man to death.
 
2003-09-07 01:00:37 AM  
Feetsza
"If it's better to let 10 guilty men go free then to send 1 innocent man to prison, I'd suggest that it's better to let 1000 guilty men go free than to put 1 innocent man to death. "


That may be so, but I sure hope you don't live in the neighborhood where 1000 free guilty men are roaming around.


I know what your saying and agree with the spirit of that; I still think that was always a poor way of someone making a point against the death penalty.

 
2003-09-07 01:01:11 AM  
Excellent reference, my hat's off.

"I hope."

Later.

RJS
 
2003-09-07 01:02:38 AM  
Why the fark did i think i would be the only one to think of the shawshank implications? stupid alcohol...

wait no, im sorry, i didnt mean it!
 
2003-09-07 01:07:46 AM  
Bad Directions :

Nice Side Show Bob reference.
 
2003-09-07 01:08:49 AM  
That may be so, but I sure hope you don't live in the neighborhood where 1000 free guilty men are roaming around.

[Looks out window] Hmm, well, I don't think all 1000 of them are around here, but maybe a few dozen. :)

Of course, I wouldn't want anything bad to happen as a result of these theoretical guilty men running around, but a wrongful execution is probably one of the most horrible things I can think that could happen to someone.
 
2003-09-07 01:11:32 AM  
On a side note, I'd sure like the (somewhat recent) custom of saying "nice reference" to go away.

Yay, you got the joke, bully for you. Keep it to yourself next time. No one cares.
 
2003-09-07 01:18:40 AM  
Yeah, I got here all excited thinking I could make a Shawshank reference first.

Way to ruin my night.
 
2003-09-07 01:20:56 AM  


"shiat, you a Rembrandt!"
 
2003-09-07 01:35:49 AM  
The idea of freeing 1,000 dangerous felons to avoid the death of one innocent is so loathsomely detestable that I can't help but think it was a naked attempt to bait a flamewar. Like this kind of thread needs any help in that department.
 
2003-09-07 01:43:34 AM  
Yeah, I got here all excited thinking I could make a Shawshank reference first.

The reference is already made in the headline! Heh.
 
Seb
2003-09-07 01:45:39 AM  
Before this gets deeper into a death penalty flamewar, I'd like to comment on:

An anonymous caller told police that Bloodsworth looked just like a police sketch of the man last seen with the girl.
Five witnesses picked him out of a lineup.


Was that their "strong case"? There must be some other coincidental evidence the article isn't mentioning, but imagine if all it took to convict someone was being picked out of a lineup.
 
2003-09-07 01:49:13 AM  
ummm, hey, it should occur to you folks that there is no need to release the death row inmates to prevent errorful execution, one merely would have to commute down to a life sentence

i believe that a murderur deserves as harsh a penalty as possible to deter the maximum people, however, since clearly we arent doing a good job of being sure these folks are murdurers, i think that life in prison should be the maximum available penalty, save for confessions or seriously obvious evidence similar to a confession

life in prison can be harsher than death if done in a certain manner, it is also cheaper, and with certain labor, can even be profitable, and we avoid this possibility of killing the innocent
 
2003-09-07 01:50:11 AM  
The idea of freeing 1,000 dangerous felons to avoid the death of one innocent is so loathsomely detestable that I can't help but think it was a naked attempt to bait a flamewar. Like this kind of thread needs any help in that department

Honestly, I wasn't trying to start a flamewar.

I do find the spectre of putting an innocent man to death "loathsomely detestable" though, without a doubt. The possibility of that is enough to guarantee that I'll never be in favour of the death penalty.
 
2003-09-07 01:59:35 AM  
Strong case against him my ass. How the hel was this guy convicted twice when he was innocent? What proof beyond a reasonable doubt could they possibly have had? Witnesses identifying him as the guy? Obviously a witness saying that someone is the guy is completely worthless.

You know how they have a lineup of people and have the witness pick the guy? Well you know what they should have to do? Instead of having six people who look completely different, they should have to have six people who look similar to the accused. THEN if the witness can't pick out the right guy you're pretty sure they're not just picking the guy because he only bears a passing resemblance to the guy they're looking for.
 
2003-09-07 02:08:50 AM  
2003-09-07 01:45:39 AM Seb
An anonymous caller told police that Bloodsworth looked just like a police sketch of the man last seen with the girl. Five witnesses picked him out of a lineup.

Was that their "strong case"? There must be some other coincidental evidence the article isn't mentioning, but imagine if all it took to convict someone was being picked out of a lineup.


Unfortunately, that IS all it takes sometimes. There are a LOT of jurors out there that still think that a guy MUST be guilty if a witness ID'd him in a lineup, and the police arrested him. After all, the police don't arrest innocent poeple, right?
 
2003-09-07 02:13:01 AM  
I'm pretty sure it's Standard Operating Procedure during lineups to present a group of people that do indeed resemble the suspect, including providing them with similar outfits.

If this isn't true, Law and Order has a lot to answer for.
 
2003-09-07 02:26:09 AM  
"Get busy livin' or get busy dying... thats goddamn right"

-Morgan Freeman as Red
 
2003-09-07 02:27:45 AM  
...oh and the music to that movie is INSANE.

DVD people
 
2003-09-07 02:31:41 AM  
People, people, people!

I think you're missing the important point here . . .



. . . that "Forrest Gump" robbed this movie of an Oscar!



Anyway, I still haven't read the linked article yet. But I want to remind everyone that director Frank Darabont recorded a commentary for the film earlier this year and get your wallets ready for a special edition DVD release next year (maybe as late as next September, actually) for the 10th Anniversary Special Edition DVD. They might even throw in the deleted scenes they shot - including the one where Red gets a chubby looking at hippy nipples when he gets out. Not kidding, read the screenplay.

If I ever acquire millions and millions of dollars someday, there are two things I'm going to do. First of all, I'm going to somehow finance a way for the films "The Shawshank Redemption" and "Back to the Future" to become physically personified in living tissue with the purpose of duking it out in a GREATEST MOVIE OF ALL TIME CAGE MATCH BATTLE ROYALE.

And two, I'm going to greenlight the sequel to the former - tentatively titled, "Shawshank 2: Andy's Boat." Or possibly, "The Shawshank Second SlapFest: 'Red, Now You're Killing ME!'"

/geek
 
2003-09-07 03:04:42 AM  
"Thank God for DNA," said Sandra O'Connor...

Until I caught up with the rest of the sentence, I thought they were quoting the Supreme Court Justice.
 
2003-09-07 04:20:23 AM  
huge props on the reference but... for christ' sake, read the farking book...
 
2003-09-07 11:10:39 AM  
I don't mean to attack, TruthMustBeTold, so don't take any offense...but it irks the HELL out of me when people call it a book.

The Shawshank Redemption wasn't based on a book. It was based on a novella. A novella by Stephen King, no less. "Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption". It's hilarious to see the look on peoples' faces when they walk into Hollywood Video (my place of work) and rent Shawshank Redemption...and I tell them that it's based on a Stephen King work. They kinda look at the movie case like, "...whaaa? But, but, but...there's no blood or gore or ghosts!"

The above reaction is exactly why people need to read all of Different Seasons, by Stephen King. It includes RHatSR, as well as Apt Pupil, another great novella. King actually wrote Different Seasons to show that he could write in a genre that wasn't horror.

All of that being said, I'm sorry, but the novella that Shawshank Redemption came from doesn't hold a candle to the movie, which is safely embedded in the top spot on my Favorite Movies of All Time list.
 
2003-09-07 11:36:11 AM  
I work for the innocence network at the University of Houston Law Center. And I can tell you that the majority of overturned criminal convictions hinge on DNA evidence that was either untested or f'ed up by the crime lame during a test prior to the original trial. The stunning fact of the matter is, though, that in 80% of those wrongful convictions, witnesses testified that the accused was unequivocally the perpetrator.

the lesson? Witness testimony is given way too much weight in our criminal justice system. When people are surprised, and see something unexpected or shocking, our memories of certain details just aren't sharp enough to make such dire recollections later on. Fortunately, in the last 10 years, crime scene investigators have gotten much better about sweeping for genetic material.

Yes, it's a very Gattaca world we're approaching. Damn that movie started off with promise before crashing and burning.
 
2003-09-07 12:59:55 PM  
This is another argument against the death penalty. The guilty guy couldn't confess even if he was already serving a life term without facing the death penalty. There is just too much to gain from having a fall guy under the death penalty.
I'm not intrinsically opposed to the death penalty, merely convinced that the state can't be trusted to handle the business competently. Maybe at least some sort of system could be introduced by which prosecutors would face some sort of liability in the event of wrongful capital convictions. If the prostitutors and cops knew they were gonna lose some major bucks personally in the event of this caliber of screw-up, they might be a bit more judicious about how they handle these things. Not gonna happen though. The inmates are firmly in charge of the asylum.
 
2003-09-07 02:07:51 PM  
[img]http://www.anthropomorphism.net/Shawshank-Animated.jpg[/img]
www.anthropomorphism.net
 
2003-09-07 02:13:46 PM  
[img]http://www.anthropomorphism.net/Shawshank-Animated.jpg[/img]
 
2003-09-07 04:40:17 PM  
That's funny... I just watched that movie the other night. I probably wouldn't have gotten the reference otherwise...

Here's what you were trying to do, RyanE...
 
2003-09-07 04:49:50 PM  
seb and sswift:

If you want a good book on the subject, read "Witness for the Defense" by Dr. Elizabeth Loftus.

(Then read "Mindhunter" by John Douglas for the other side of things. The man's a bit full of himself, but other than that the book is good.)

Sadly, being sure of oneself is often confused with being correct. And while an eyewitness identification (even from a lineup) is one of the weakest pieces of evidence against someone, there is often nothing more convincing to a jury than someone pointing in court and giving an unequivocal "That was him!".
 
2003-09-08 10:52:03 AM  
Thanks, Juan. You rock.
 
2003-09-08 07:53:02 PM  
I'm actually going to Mansfield Ohio tomorrow to see the prison where it was filmed. While there, I'm going to watch it for the 175th time on my laptop in the parking lot.
Yeah, I'm obsessed.

Ryan
 
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