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(BBC)   Hints of the Higgs boson seen tomorrow at the LHC   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 108
    More: Cool, LHC, statistical significance, particle beams  
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15653 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jul 2011 at 9:16 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-07-25 03:44:00 PM
They won't find anything close.

Nothing but a giant waste of money.
 
2011-07-25 04:52:45 PM

rogue49: Not a pro, amateur...who loves dimensional physics, relativity and quantum mechanics.
I've got some ideas myself, but don't feel like taking the time or effort here.
But thanks for posting at Fark.

/geez...why do people think you have to get paid to do science? Damn, its all about those little piece of paper giving the warm & fuzzies.


Ah, so you're a crackpot who makes up terms like "dimensional physics."

You don't have to get paid to do science. But if it is just a hobby for you, chances are that the "science" you do is garbage.
 
2011-07-25 05:18:56 PM

PerilousApricot: minitrue noram: at that level, pfft, i'm seriously doubtful the Higgs turns out to be a particle. i'll of course argue that there is an event there, that is has follows similar rules of forces of attraction. but really, i suspect we're looking at massless interactions of energy which, per their own peculiar rules, are the root "urge" that makes up gravitation.

[dense.lecture.on.theoretical.physics.jpg]

The higgs is related to gravitation because mass is related to gravity, but the idea is that higgs is (in a way) for why things have mass. Also, the higgs only makes sense if it's a particle, it's nonsensical to talk about it otherwise


Didn't some guy with funny hair come up with an equation relating mass to energy a while back?

And I vaguely recall something about wave/particle duality. Of course, I could be wrong.
 
2011-07-25 05:24:38 PM
Particle physics should be outlawed. Every particle they find can be split in half into infinity. Use the brain matter on something usefull.
 
2011-07-25 05:47:57 PM

oldebayer: PerilousApricot: minitrue noram: at that level, pfft, i'm seriously doubtful the Higgs turns out to be a particle. i'll of course argue that there is an event there, that is has follows similar rules of forces of attraction. but really, i suspect we're looking at massless interactions of energy which, per their own peculiar rules, are the root "urge" that makes up gravitation.

[dense.lecture.on.theoretical.physics.jpg]

The higgs is related to gravitation because mass is related to gravity, but the idea is that higgs is (in a way) for why things have mass. Also, the higgs only makes sense if it's a particle, it's nonsensical to talk about it otherwise

Didn't some guy with funny hair come up with an equation relating mass to energy a while back?

And I vaguely recall something about wave/particle duality. Of course, I could be wrong.


Yeah, there's a relationship between mass and energy, but it doesn't always apply. Photons always have zero mass, even though they can have a ton of energy in them. The (invariant) mass of particles is .. invariant, and the higgs mechanism is part of the explanation for why certain particles have the mass that we see.
 
2011-07-25 05:58:59 PM
knowyourmeme.com

Farking Bosons, How Do They Work?
 
2011-07-25 06:44:51 PM

PerilousApricot: Yeah, there's a relationship between mass and energy, but it doesn't always apply. Photons always have zero mass, even though they can have a ton of energy in them.


That isn't because of the higgs boson or because that relationship doesn't apply. E=mc2 uses the old notion of 'relativistic mass' - the m in that equation is not the same as (rest) mass, and a photon DOES have nonzero 'relativistic mass' equal to E/c2.

The equivalent equation using the modern understanding of mass would be E2=m2c4+p2c2
 
2011-07-25 06:56:10 PM

Sum Dum Gai: PerilousApricot: Yeah, there's a relationship between mass and energy, but it doesn't always apply. Photons always have zero mass, even though they can have a ton of energy in them.

That isn't because of the higgs boson or because that relationship doesn't apply. E=mc2 uses the old notion of 'relativistic mass' - the m in that equation is not the same as (rest) mass, and a photon DOES have nonzero 'relativistic mass' equal to E/c2.

The equivalent equation using the modern understanding of mass would be E2=m2c4+p2c2


Right, but photons aren't massive, just like W and Z bosons aren't (weren't?) supposed to be massive when the gauge theory first came out (which lead to people sticking spontaneous symmetry breaking and the higgs mechanism to give a reason for them to have masses).

The responses have gotten dropped between here and there, but basically further up someone said:

at that level, pfft, i'm seriously doubtful the Higgs turns out to be a particle. i'll of course argue that there is an event there, that is has follows similar rules of forces of attraction. but really, i suspect we're looking at massless interactions of energy which, per their own peculiar rules, are the root "urge" that makes up gravitation.

and I was trying to explain that explaining why things have mass and their interactions through gravity is kinda conflating two different concepts together (even though they're intertwined)
 
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